Study co-authors Adam Frank and Woodruff Sullivan looked at recent discoveries of potentially habitable exoplanets and considered the odds of whether sophisticated civilizations existed on them in the past or present.In 1961, astronomer Frank Drake — founder of the SETI Institute SETI stands for Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence — devised what is now known as the Drake equation to estimate the number of planets that may be home to civilizations with the ability to communicate beyond their world.While the Drake equation calculates the number of advanced alien civilizations that could exist in the Milky Way galaxy, Frank and Sullivan s equation expands the question to calculate the number of advanced civilizations that have existed in our galaxy throughout the whole history of the universe.After that, it s just a matter of counting up the tally of stars in the visible universe, and saying that — with all the suitable real estate that s out there, if we re the only place with intelligent life, then we ve really won the mother of all lotteries.Shostak cautions against being overly optimistic or pessimistic about the SETI Institute s searches for intelligent signals from possible neighbors in outer space.It s a bit like an ant coming out of its hive, seeing the enormous amount of real estate stretching in all directions and deciding that, if its home is the only ant hill, then its existence is a near-miracle.
Making first contact with intelligent alien life is probably on the top of any astronomer s wish list.What we often forget though is that not every alien civilisation is going to want to play nice, and so in our efforts to reach out, the messaging has to be flawless.In 1974, scientists sent a three minute message towards M13, a cluster of stars some 24,000 light years away.It s too late to conceal ourselves in the universe, so we should decide how we want to represent ourselves, At present, one of the major concerns around how we re doing that is focused around our love of entertainment.Instead it will focus on redefining how we package the information we send out.The new formula should give considerable hope to those who wonder if humanity is indeed the only civilisation in the universe because it not only suggests that there are advanced alien races out there but that the likliehood is that many have already been and gone long before we evolved.
Planet 9: Alien or chimera?They then ran a computer simulation demonstrating that as the Sun and its planetary system developed as part of a relatively compact cluster of stars, exoplanet kidnap was certainly possible.When the sun later departed from the stellar cluster in which it was born, Planet 9 was stuck in an orbit around the sun."This led Batygin and Brown to propose that while the planet formed from the disk of matter surrounding the Sun, it possibly "got knocked out of alignment, possibly by a major object like Jupiter, and sent on a new orbital trajectory".Mustill said: "It is almost ironic that while astronomers often find exoplanets hundreds of light years away in other solar systems, there's probably one hiding in our own backyard."Mustill and his colleagues' findings are published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
But the closer you look at his words and actions, the more you ll start to see: He s an alien who came from another galaxy to help save humanity.Why is Musk so hell-bent on getting rockets to leave our atmosphere?Because eventually, he needs to get home.I mean, if your own race had long been at odds with the extraterrestrials that reside on Mars, you d want to blow them up, too.What s more, he proposed this way before we even knew how much trouble we were in.But no one paid attention to this concept until he proposed it and gave us a few hints about how to do it right.
On Wednesday, Elon Musk suggested that Earth is simply a simulation from an alien race s video game.Yet Musk is pouring billions into his secret master plan to get transportation off fossil fuels, reduce global emissions, and therefore prevent a catastrophic warming of the planet.But wouldn't recommend transporting astronauts beyond Earth-moon region.But no one paid attention to this concept until he proposed it and gave us a few hints about how to do it right.Consider last night s exchange with Joshua Topolsky at the Code conference:Well @joshuatopolsky just asked @elonmusk if he thinks we are living in a-- and musk finished the sentence for him--"simulation"How could he have possibly guessed that Topolsky was going to ask that?https://t.co/7Cc6rnsvSnHave recently come to appreciate the awesome, absurdist humor of Waiting for Godot.
Many are pointing to the company's firm privacy policies – where it keeps as much information about you on your phone and nowhere else – to explain why both Siri and the AI API will do their work on your device rather than in the cloud.But it's only a partial kimono opening – a flash of leg perhaps.And it is not opening it up to text, just voice.Apple soon put a stop to that.Will this forced, partial opening up of its AI offerings help the company keep up with Amazon and Google?But then there is the privacy argument to fall back on, so Apple almost certainly won't feel the need to ask itself that question.
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images Some of the world's wealthy elite choose to donate to charity.Billionaire tech investor Yuri Milner, however, is spending $100 million over 10 years on space exploration to fund the search for extraterrestrial life.His plan is to send a probe to travel to the next star system, Alpha Centauri, which is 25 trillion miles away."But I think that a few hundred years ago, people did not really think about 50 years as being long-term."And yet they were planning for it, and then they were slowly building it, and they were improving technology and so on and so forth.As for why he chose to spend his money on science rather than a more traditional philanthropic cause, Milner said he believes that 95% of all nonprofits should be aiming to "equalize the equation" in terms of socioeconomic issues.
den-belitsky via Getty ImagesSadly, it s not going to be anytime soon.We haven t heard from aliens yet, as space is a big place but that doesn t mean no one is out there, said student Evan Solomonides who authored a paper which he will be talking about at the Astronomical Society s meeting June 16 in San Diego.It s possible to hear any time at all, but it becomes likely we will have heard around 1,500 years from now.Either intelligent extraterrestrial life may be rare, or perhaps - echoing practically every dystopian sci-fi film we ve seen - that intelligent civilisations destroy themselves before reaching out to the stars.But the scientists are quite keen to explain the delay - humans have only been broadcasting TV and radio signals into space for around 80 years.He added: We are on the third planet around a tediously boring star surrounded by other completely normal stars about two-thirds of the way along one of several arms of a remarkably average spiral galaxy.
Improvements in astronomical observation technology have moved us from retail to wholesale planet discovery, writes University of Rochester professor of astrophysics Adam Frank in an op-ed piece for The New York Times.Frank s piece, titled, Yes, There Have Been Aliens, argues that, at some point before humans existed, there were probably aliens.Frank refers to an equation conceived in 1961 by a man named Frank Drake yes, their names are easy to confuse who was invited to host a conference on the possibilities of communication between solar systems.Drake decided to create an equation for the event, which attempted to calculate how many advanced civilizations existed off of Earth, since the quantity of advanced civilizations increases the chances of interstellar contact.For example, he writes, Instead of asking how many civilizations currently exist, we asked what the probability is that ours is the only technological civilization that has ever appeared.Specifically, unless the probability for evolving a civilization on a habitable-zone planet is less than one in 10 billion trillion, then we are not the first.
In a new study that will be presented at an American Astronomical Society meeting later this month, astronomers Even Solomonides and Yervant Terzian combine the Fermi Paradox with the Mediocrity Principle to show that we shouldn t expect to hear from aliens for another 1,500 years.Since the 1960s, SETI has been trying to find aliens by detecting their radio signals.Image: NRAO/AUI As physicist Enrico Fermi noted nearly a half-century ago, the Milky Way may be huge and full of stars—200 billion give or take a few—but there s been more than enough time for aliens to have made their presence known in one form or another.The mediocrity principle, devised by the 16th century mathematician Copernicus, suggests there s nothing unusual or special about Earth, humanity, and our place in the cosmos, and that if anything we re actually quite banal in large scheme of things.And then they d have to go about the daunting task of deciphering our signals.For an alien civilization to detect a radio signal thousands of light-years away, they d have to focus massive arrays of radio antennas for protracted periods of time from months or years at a time at a single spot in the sky.
NASA/ESAA telescope to new worlds?Researchers suggest the JWST could probe their atmospheres for signs of life after it launches in 2018.This is the latest salvo in a debate raging through the astronomy community.Astronomers are finally on the technological brink of being able to answer the question: Are we alone?To some extent we re all publicly funded scientists, or the majority of us are, so what the public wants us to find out is I think a legitimate motivation for trying something, even if it s difficult, says Joanna Barstow at the University of Oxford, who led the study on exoplanet detection with the JWST.asks Casey Dreier, the director of space policy at the Planetary Society in Pasadena, California.
In a new study that will be presented at an American Astronomical Society meeting later this month, astronomers Even Solomonides and Yervant Terzian combine the Fermi Paradox with the Mediocrity Principle to show that we shouldn t expect to hear from aliens for another 1,500 years.Since the 1960s, SETI has been trying to find aliens by detecting their radio signals.Image: NRAO/AUI As physicist Enrico Fermi noted nearly a half-century ago, the Milky Way may be huge and full of stars—200 billion give or take a few—but there s been more than enough time for aliens to have made their presence known in one form or another.And then they d have to go about the daunting task of deciphering our signals.Image: Long Pham/Concept Ships An interesting conclusion, to be sure, but this study—which has yet to be published in a peer reviewed journal—has some problems.For an alien civilisation to detect a radio signal thousands of light-years away, they d have to focus massive arrays of radio antennas for protracted periods of time from months or years at a time at a single spot in the sky.
The experts say that it could be 1,500 years before alien contact with Earth and will present their research at the American Astronomical Society s meeting in San Diego Thursday.Aliens, however, would likely find these transmissions indecipherable, according to Solomonides, who says they would need to decode the light waves into sounds, then parse 3,000 human languages to interpret the message.The astronomers suggest that Earth might encounter an alien civilization when around half of the Milky Way has been signaled in 1,500 years.David Kipping, assistant professor of astronomy at Columbia University, who was not involved in the research, told FoxNews.com that the search for alien life is much broader than radio and TV signals, encompassing, for example, the search for artifacts within and beyond our solar system.Nonetheless, the search for alien life continues to fascinate.In April, for example, celebrated physicist Stephen Hawking joined forces with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and investor Yuri Milner in an ambitious plan for seeking life in outer space.
This crowdfunding campaign was set up in May by Yale astronomer Tabby Boyajian, and it managed to meet its $100,000 goal in just 30 days.The next step is to figure out the logistics, but Boyajian, who s been leading the research into KIC 8462852, says observations could start as early as later this summer.These huge dips in luminosity are way too large to be a passing planet, hence the suspicion the anomaly is being caused by swarms of comets, a distorted star, some unknown astronomical phenomenon—or an advanced alien civilisation in the process of building a gigantic solar array around the star.Boyajian will now be able to secure year-long access to the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network.Artist s impression of a Dyson sphere Credit: Slawek Wojtowicz Last year, speculation mounted over whether or not KIC 8462852 might be an alien megastructure, perhaps a Dyson sphere.If a partial Dyson sphere is there, we should still be able to detect it in the form of irregular, but discernable, radiation signatures.
KIC 8462852's huge dips in brightness could be caused by swarms of comets, possibly the remnants of a shattered planet.The next step is to figure out the logistics, but Boyajian, who s been leading the research into KIC 8462852, says observations could start as early as later this summer.These huge dips in luminosity are way too large to be a passing planet, hence the suspicion the anomaly is being caused by swarms of comets, a distorted star, some unknown astronomical phenomenon—or an advanced alien civilization in the process of building a gigantic solar array around the star.Boyajian will now be able to secure year-long access to the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network.Artist s impression of a Dyson sphere Credit: Slawek Wojtowicz Last year, speculation mounted over whether or not KIC 8462852 might be an alien megastructure, perhaps a Dyson sphere.If a partial Dyson sphere is there, we should still be able to detect it in the form of irregular, but discernable, radiation signatures.
Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare is emphasizing a futuristic space setting and high-tech weaponry, but if you were looking forward to blasting some extraterrestrials, you re in for some disappointment: The game won t feature aliens.You have to stretch and squash and work with the facts to get what you really want from the experience.One of those creative licenses is the inclusion of sound in the vacuum of space.But Horton adds that with a suit designed to simulate sounds through photons, soldiers can still be aware of their surroundings in a way that is actually very plausible.New seeker grenades, which lock onto targets after they re thrown, were also created specifically to combat the zero-gravity nature of space.We re been very impressed with what we ve seen of Infinite Warfare so far, likening some of its campaign moments to that of the original 2003 game.
Independence Day director Roland Emmerich had the idea for the original ID4 film when fielding a question about his belief in the existence of alien life in 1994.Back then he was promoting Stargate, and the idea that alien invasion films generally focused on a race of alien beings that traveled long distances to Earth only to remain mysterious and hidden once they arrive.I think that's probably why we are so fascinated with the idea of intelligent life beyond Earth ."Emmerich quite liked that possibility - far more than what he fears the reality of the situation would likely be.Independence Day Resurgence hits theaters across the United States today and tonight, 20 years after the original.Woods and James Vanderbilt.
Such stories usually bring to mind little green men with an affinity for putting probes where no one wants a probe.They met a fascinating cast of characters, many of whom warned them that the government was watching.Kenneth Langley calls himself Agent 0051 and spends his free time gathering evidence of alien existence.Forty-one years ago, the story goes, aliens abducted Walton from a national forest in Arizona and left him at a gas station in New Mexico five days later.It portrays them as people seeking answers to questions that fascinate, or trouble, them.Phenomena will be exhibited at Rencontres d Arles from July 4 through September 25.
Credit iStock/Tobias KTyson has speculated that intelligent alien life may have created a giant zoo, a place humanity knows as 'Earth'Planet Earth could be an elaborate zoo created by a hyper-intelligent alien civilisation, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has claimed."In the same way as when you re walking down a street and there s a worm there.What would that sentence mean to a chimp?I want the solar system to be our backyard, but the motivation should not be to stop everyone dying from a cosmic event.Earlier this month Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk said there was only a one in a billion chance that we weren t living in a simulation.Now, forty years later, we have photo-realistic, 3D simulations with millions of people playing simultaneously and it's getting better every year.
Tin foil hats at the ready: alien-hunters reckon they've spotted an alien base lying at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean.The finding was made on Google Earth by Argentinian Marcelo Igazusta, an extra-terrestrial enthusiast, who believes it shows an underwater pyramid structure measuring between 8.5 and 11 miles across.The sighting was picked up by ET blog UFO Sightings Daily, which claimed the image could alternatively show a UFO parked beneath the waves off the coast of West Mexico.Blog editor Scott Waring called the find "a monumental discovery", likening the structure to the ancient pyramids built by the Myan and Aztec peoples thousands of years ago.Yet Waring, who also claims to have spotted monkeys on Mars, buildings on Mercury and a Kraken roaming the South Atlantic, doesn't believe these could have been built by human hands."Humans could never have built such a construction," he said.
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