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Instagram is a Facebook-owned product and as such its privacy practices need to be put under the microscope.
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Maëlle Gavet says that seeing kindness as a weakness in business is a harmful mentality, and will hold companies back from meaningful improvement.
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Stop trying to duct-tape a ring light to your laptop, and get yourself a dedicated videophone.
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Researchers at New York University are using a browser plug-in to gather info on how political advertisements are being targeted on Facebook. The social network has insisted they stop.
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Facebook sent the NYU Ad Observatory a letter demanding they stop studying Facebook's political ad-targeting practices. Researchers won't comply.
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Plus: An Among Us spam attack, China's favorite vulnerabilities, and more of the week's top security news.
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Social networking and online casinos are two of the greatest web phenomena today.Facebook and Facebook have got the entire digital universe by hurricane, allowing folks from any place of the planet connect with slotxo other around common interests.And now, on the web casino operators are obtaining methods to integrate social network press apps into their sites.ShoutBox is a cultural networking application presented by Bwin, and it has become very effective, letting online people to conversation amongst themselves while enjoying casino activities online.Online gaming specialists believe that this sort of cultural networking can become an intrinsic area of the online casino of the future.Online wagering web sites which have perhaps not mounted their very own social networking apps use current social networking web sites to keep recent players interested and to create new kinds on board.Facebook records and Facebook Lover pages are methods where casino operators grow their achieve, by using advertising campaigns and addressing questions quickly.You can find also activities on Facebook, such as for instance Zynga Poker, that web casinos use to drum up curiosity about their sites.
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A Tory MP has said she “very much” hopes businesses offering to feed hungry children for free “will not be seeking any further government support”, as the row over free school meals continues. In a now-deleted Facebook post Selaine Saxby, who represents North Devon, wrote: “I am delighted our local businesses have bounced back so much after lockdown they are able to give away food for free, and very much hope they will not be seeking any further government support.”Saxby is one of more than 300 Tories who voted against extending free school meals to the UK’s poorest children through the half term and Christmas holidays on Wednesday. Another Tory MP in a show of utter contempt for her constituents @SelaineSaxby actually having a go at businesses going out of their way to feed hungry kids Lower than low this https://t.co/qVtcjixy2Y— Liam Thorp (@LiamThorpECHO) October 24, 2020After facing intense criticism online for her comment Saxby insisted her words had been taken “out of context”, but did not explain the context they should have been read in. She added: “The portrayal of my recent comments on social media, out of context, does not accurately convey my views – I of course deeply regret any offence which may have been caused.”Statement follows below: pic.twitter.com/7RPKTV9GPG— Selaine Saxby MP (@SelaineSaxby) October 24, 2020Leaders in North Devon – where the hospitality industry has been particularly hard-hit by the pandemic – have responded furiously to Saxby’s comments, with the North Devon Liberal Democrats’s spokesperson telling Devon Live: “I am stunned at what I have read from Saxby.“Not only has she tried to justify the fact that she has voted in a way that could see children go hungry, but she’s also attacked the hospitality industry in North Devon who have taken one of the biggest beatings during this pandemic, but still step forward to support children.” The North Devon MP’s Facebook post began to circulate just ours after fellow Tory MP Ben Bradley, suggested free school meal vouchers for the children in his constituency “effectively” went to crack dens and brothels.Bradley, who represents Mansfield, claimed on Friday evening that one of the kids in his constituency “lives in a crack den” while another “in a brothel” and that extending free school meals would not reach these children. When one Twitter user responded suggested a ”£20 cash direct to a crack den and brothel” could be “the way forward”, the MP said: “Thats what FSM vouchers in the summer effectively did.”The conversation has since been deleted from Twitter, but not before it was screenshotted and met with huge backlash on social media. Like Saxby, Bradley has also claimed his comments were taken out of context. Saxby and Bradley are amongst 112 MPs who signed letter to Labour leader Keir Starmer claiming that Angela Rayner’s “scum” comment had provoked “widespread abuse” towards Tories. We’ve written to @Keir_Starmer after @AngelaRayner’s comment resulted in widespread abuse towards our MPs, staff and families.Will Sir Keir take action against Labour MPs and party members who perpetrate abuse, and apologise for Rayner’s record of unparliamentary behaviour? pic.twitter.com/E0q7quLaAb— Amanda Milling (@amandamilling) October 23, 2020The letters calls for the opposition leader to “publicly apologise for Angela Rayner’s record of unparliamentary behaviour”, complaining that the deputy leader’s use of the word “scum” (for which she has since publicly apologised) had led to it trending on Twitter and sparking abusive phone calls. But critics of the government have accused the Tories of trying to shift the blame for public anger onto Labour, instead of addressing the widespread unpopularity of their vote against a motion to extend free school meals. Starves the nation's kids.Nation gets angry.Blames Labour. https://t.co/2fGcKd7bZx— Femi (@Femi_Sorry) October 24, 2020If I understand this correctly your saying widespread outrage across the country has nothing to do with Conservative MP’s wanting to let kids go hungry during the holidays & everything to do with one Conservative MP having been called a name in Parliament https://t.co/MwSBXdb6yQ— Peter Stefanovic (@PeterStefanovi2) October 24, 2020The reason Conservative MPs are on the receiving end of legitimate public anger is because people are reacting to how they voted & what they said, not because one MP used one word. This attempt to shift the blame is tawdry & desperate. You have no claim to the moral high ground. https://t.co/hIADt0HNNY— Alex von Tunzelmann (@alexvtunzelmann) October 24, 2020Related... Tory MP Suggests Free School Meals 'Effectively' Go To Crack Dens And Brothels Five Baffling Reasons Tories Have Given For Voting Against Free School Meals Angela Rayner Apologises For Calling Tory MP 'Scum' In Commons
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If you’re looking to bookmark a Facebook page link or any other website, it is really easy to learn how to make bookmarks for any browser, save bookmarks, and organize bookmarks.Not only can you maintain bookmarks in Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari, but there are also online bookmark managers that an bookmark Facebook page links and other web pages for future referencing.These online bookmark managers range from websites such as StumbleUpon, Twitter, and Pinterest, which display your bookmarked links to followers and friends, to private plugins and tools for various browsers that manage your bookmarks online, but maintain your privacy.Privacy online is paramount to some people, and it should be, especially when linking to social media that allows personal privacy settings, such as Facebook page links.No one wants their friends’ information to be proliferated for the entire online community.For this reason, many people choose not to use social bookmarking sites like Twitter, Pinterest, and StumbleUpon.Of course, there is always the option to save and organize bookmarks on each browser that you use, but for some people, that creates problems because they use more than one computer or there are glitches in the syncing of bookmarks from one browser to another.
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It is hard for me to start writing this piece because I have started writing it in my head a hundred times. I have tried to format it into a tweet, then a series of tweets; a long Instagram caption, a Facebook status.This now happens with nearly every thought I have. It pops into my head and, as it does, I try to come up with a way of expressing it on a social media platform. It is frustrating because that didn’t used to be the case. Well, it was the case for a long time, then it wasn’t, and now it is again.Like a lot of millennials hovering around 30, I grew up online and spent my early and mid twenties glued to my laptop and phone screen. a new app or website would launch and within months I would be hooked. I never really questioned it, and the constant technological innovations were too exciting to care anyway.With every bit of myself I throw into the online ether, I dissociate a little bit more from what is happening to us.First we tweeted by text, then Twitter got on our phones; suddenly there was Instagram, and filters, and Snapchat, and stories you could post, and gifs were everywhere, and Vine compilations were brilliant – and so on. Then something changed, around a year ago; maybe it was that we had hit a tech plateau, where new apps stopped being novel and bold.Maybe I just aged; I had spent years live-tweeting my every thought, accidentally becoming semi-prominent in the process, and the constant exposure had started to feel draining. I also noticed that a lot of my friends were slowly separating themselves from their online personas. One by one, they started to tweet only sporadically, set their Instagrams to private, and generally became more guarded online.I can’t pretend I’d gone off grid by the time the pandemic hit; I was still posting frequently, but had been making efforts to scroll less, read more books, and generally not look at my phone when I didn’t need to. It was a process I was working on. I knew letting go of such a deeply ingrained habit would take time, but I felt I was on the right path.That all came crashing down the moment lockdown started, of course. Suddenly, there was nothing to do but scroll, and no-one to share my thoughts with unless I tweeted them. I even kept up an Instagram presence.Looking back, it is impressive I managed to post so many pictures given how starved my life had become of things worth picturing. I soldiered on regardless; selfies, sunsets, buildings encountered on walks, close-ups of the plants I kept compulsively ordering online.Related... Your Self-Care Toolkit For Dealing With The Tough Months Ahead Instagram Was Affecting My Mental Health, So I Quit. Here's What I Didn't See Coming What saddens me is not that I became so hooked to social media again in lockdown – there was nothing else for me to do – but that I am yet to reverse the habit. Even at the height of the summer, when us Londoners were lucky enough to have most of our lives back, I remained glued to my screen.I used to find it rude when friends scrolled through Twitter while we had drinks, but suddenly I started doing it. On several occasions, I stopped walking in the street to take selfies because the light looked nice on my face, aware and mortified that passersby were clearly judging me.Some nights, I would go to bed, think of a quip and make myself leave my bed to tweet it because I knew I wouldn’t be able to fall asleep otherwise.I post pictures knowing that I will look at them again in a few months, and suddenly I am no longer stuck in the tedium of our current lives.Once again, social media is taking up a huge amount of space in my brain. I check my notifications on each app constantly and always in the same order, like a ritual, and I am frustrated if I have done something interesting on a Sunday afternoon but forgotten to post anything about it. I’d long wondered what it must be like to be a needy, angsty 13-year-old in the era of constant connectivity and now I know; at 28, I have become one.Still, I wonder if there is some deeper coping mechanism at work here. As middle-aged columnists used to claim, documenting our every move meant that we were not living our lives to the fullest. By obsessing over, say, the pictures we took on a night out, we forgot to actually enjoy said night out. I am not sure their worries were entirely founded – I’m fairly certain I did manage to have fun when I meant to – but perhaps they had a point.Every time I tweet a fleeting thought and post a picture from my daily walk, I break the fourth wall. I invite an audience into my head and welcome them into my life, and suddenly I am not alone anymore, nor am I living in the present.I post pictures knowing that I will look at them again in a few months, and suddenly I am no longer stuck in the tedium of our current lives. I’ve established a link to my future self, who will presumably want to remember what happened in the year of the plague, and scroll down her own Instagram for memories.With every bit of myself I throw into the online ether, I dissociate a little bit more from what is happening to us. Suddenly, my life becomes a performance; a show about a woman trying to keep going through life when everything is uncertain and she feels quite sad and small.Perhaps voluntary alienation isn’t the best way to go about all this and perhaps I should be feeling everything I need to be feeling so I emerge in one piece.But perhaps that prospect is too daunting to consider, and instead I will keep my face close to my screen, where everything is a little bit less real, until it is safe to go out and live fully again.Marie Le Conte is a freelance journalist.More in Opinion... Opinion: Marcus Rashford’s Campaign Isn’t An Inspiration – It’s A Tragedy Opinion: Angela Rayner Was Right To Give Scummy Behaviour The Name It Deserves Opinion: The Tier System Is Doomed To Fail – But There Is A Way Out Opinion: Boris Johnson Knew Test And Trace Wasn't World Beating – And Ignored it
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