Technological advancements over the years have made airline travel safer and more convenient than ever.Unfortunately, things like mechanical failures and intentional acts of terrorism are still a very real concern in this day and age.For loved ones that have lost friends or family members as a result of a downed aircraft, the realization that nothing can change what happened can be overwhelming.Factor in the possibility of not knowing what caused a crash or even where a jet went down and you ve got the worst possible scenarioAireon LLC and FlightAware, two US-based firms in the airline industry, hope to ensure the location of wreckage from flights like Malaysia Airlines MH370 don't remain a mystery.As Reuters reports, traditional methods involve planes sending tracking signals to ground-based stations.
In an unprecedented move, Malaysia Airlines will soon become the first in the commercial aviation industry to track its fleet of planes via satellite.The airline signed a deal with Aireon, SITAONAIR and FlightAware to use a network of satellites that will help it monitor its planes across even the most remote areas of the world, including the polar ice caps.The announcement comes even as the airline continues to undergo investigations over the tragic 2014 incident, which saw one of its fleet MH370, with 239 people aboard, go missing, in what is considered to be one of the most mysterious incidents in aviation history.Satellite tracking confirmed that the aircraft crashed into the Indian Ocean, southwest of Australia.However, a massive underwater search to locate the plane failed and was called off in January.Malaysia is expected to announce the final report on the MH370 probe by the end of the year.
It comes three years after its MH370 flight bound for Beijing disappeared with 239 people on board.Using a soon-to-be-launched satellite network, the airline will be able to monitor its planes in areas where there is currently no surveillance.They include polar regions and remote areas of oceans not covered by existing systems.The airline reached a deal for the service provided by US-based Aireon, FlightAware and SITAONAIR.The new system can also provide more regular updates on a plane's location, especially when travelling over oceans and other remote areas, said SITAONAIR's portfolio director Paul Gibson."With access to up-to-the-minute reporting, Malaysia Airlines will know the location, heading, speed and altitude of all aircraft in its fleet, at all times, and be alerted to any exceptions."
Whatever shape the test flights make on flight trackers, it's good to know Boeing is testing those engines.While the vast majority of airplane flights go from A to B in pretty much a straight line, a recent one by Boeing did anything but.The pilot of the Boeing 787 aircraft spent a whole 18 hours drawing an outline of the plane — better known as the Dreamliner — that covered more than 20 states from Michigan in the north to Texas in the south.Let’s clear be clear about this — he wasn’t in the cockpit with a huge piece of paper and a pack of crayons; he was flying the plane in the shape of a plane.The image could be seen gradually forming on online flight tracker services like Flightradar24 and FlightAware.Rather than a costly publicity stunt aimed at highlighting the ability of the Dreamliner to fly for almost a day without needing to refuel, the exercise was in fact a necessary endurance test for a Rolls-Royce aircraft engine that’s currently undergoing certification.
For many Europeans, a “festive flight” might mean a short trip up to Lapland with the family to meet Santa Claus.But for a German pilot in the cockpit of an Airbus A380 over Germany this week, it meant flying a route in the shape of a giant Christmas tree.Taking around five-and-a-half hours to complete, the outline of the tree — complete with festive baubles — appeared on online flight tracker services like Flightradar24 and FlightAware.No, the plane’s captain wasn’t a rogue pilot who’d downed one too many Christmas sherries before taking the controls, nor were there any passengers in the back wondering what on earth was going on.The carefully planned flight was actually testing a new A380, a double-decker aircraft that’s currently the largest passenger plane in the world.It’s just that Airbus fancied having a bit of fun with the route.
Lamar Advertising has partnered with Wieden + Kennedy, Clear Channel and other OOH companies in a digital billboard campaign for Delta and Equinox.The out-of-home companies have contributed in a media buy that uses Delta’s real-time flight data to trigger content on a billboard — considered the first effort of its kind — for a campaign the brands have called SweatLag.In this campaign, Equinox and Delta have launched a cross-promotional effort to reward passengers on select flights with a free, one-day voucher to use upon arrival.The campaign began on June 28, with 10 digital billboards in proximity to Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) displaying messages specifically for those who have just arrived from their Delta flights from five international and three domestic cities.Using technology from FlightAware, the billboard space will populate with flight numbers and cities of origination with encouraging messages to help customers head to Equinox for a gym session to help them “sweat off” their jetlag.Billboard content has been set to change shortly after those selected flights land.
Southwest Airlines flight 718 landed in Kansas City with a cracked front windshield on Wednesday, Fox affiliate Fox4 first reported.Southwest told Business Insider that the outer pane of the cockpit's left-side window cracked during the flight's descent."Aircraft windows are designed with multiple, redundant layers, and the cockpit window remained completely intact.The flight landed safely, and no emergency was declared," the airline said.The aircraft, a Boeing 737, landed at Kansas City International Airport around 6:30 pm, according to the flight-tracking site FlightAware.The flight had departed from Washington D.C.'s Reagan National Airport.
A pilot based in Adelaide, Australia, took an artistically inspired flight path on Tuesday morning.Australia’s ABC News reported that between 8:53am and 11:57am a flight training pilot in a Diamond Star plane followed a course that drew two penises then spelled out “I’M BORED” – all of which could only be detected by a flight tracker.The flight tracking company FlightAware shared an image of the tracked flight with Gizmodo.“It is fairly common for pilots to get creative and trace words or other images in the sky while they fly,” a FlightAware spokesperson told Gizmodo when we asked if crude images drawn out by pilots is rare.The spokesperson did not directly comment about the suggestive nature of the image they originally provided and instead referenced proposals, birthday messages, and a Texas Longhorn that appeared in their system after a heated University of Texas football game.Australia Civil Aviation Safety Authority spokesperson Peter Gibson told ABC that flight-path drawings are “uncommon but not unheard of.”
A pilot based in Adelaide, Australia, took an artistically inspired flight path on Tuesday morning.Australia’s ABC News reported that between 8:53am and 11:57am a flight training pilot in a Diamond Star plane followed a course that drew two penises then spelled out “I’M BORED” – all of which could only be detected by a flight tracker.The flight tracking company FlightAware shared an image of the tracked flight with Gizmodo.“It is fairly common for pilots to get creative and trace words or other images in the sky while they fly,” a FlightAware spokesperson told Gizmodo when we asked if crude images drawn out by pilots is rare.The spokesperson did not directly comment about the suggestive nature of the image they originally provided and instead referenced proposals, birthday messages, and a Texas Longhorn that appeared in their system after a heated University of Texas football game.Australia Civil Aviation Safety Authority spokesperson Peter Gibson told ABC that flight-path drawings are “uncommon but not unheard of.”
Hundreds of Southwest, Delta and United Airlines' flights were delayed Monday due to a computer issue.AeroData, a vendor that lets carriers track plane weight and balance, suffered a temporary outage, the FAA said.Some passengers took the delays as a bad April Fools' joke, and weren't laughing about it.For the second time in as many weeks, a computer outage on Monday delayed multiple airlines' flights across the US, leaving passengers furious.The Federal Aviation Administration and Southwest blamed the delays on a technical issue with the vendor AeroData, which some airlines use to plan weight and balance of flights.By 8 a.m., the computer issues had been resolved, Delta Air Lines, said, but not before more than 1,400 flights had been delayed and another 136 canceled, according to data from FlightAware.
United Airlines is getting in on the Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker hype, bringing a bunch of Episode 9 theming to its on-board experience.One of its Boeing 737-800 planes will get wrapped in a Star Wars poster, with a different colored lightsaber on each side of the aircraft.Headrests will have emblems of the Resistance or the First Order.The United Star Wars plane will be tracked on the app FlightAware as an X-Wing symbol rather than a standard plane, too.The airline will also provide Rise of Skywalker amenity kits to passengers, the on-board music will be Star Wars (no word on whether it's the Imperial March) and the in-flight safety demonstration video will feature Star Wars characters.Let's hope we get Poe Dameron telling us exactly how to fly this X-Wing, or Luke Skywalker calling it a piece of junk.
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Southwest Airlines has delayed and canceled flights for the third day in a row as it continues dealing with the fallout from technical issues.
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