Image: Royal Navy / Sean CleeThe UK’s Royal Navy is partnering with Palmer Luckey’s defense technology firm Anduril Industries as part of a larger initiative to modernize the force, according to Naval Technology.Announced earlier this year, the Royal Navy is investing £75 million (about $95 million) in an effort to introduce a pair of autonomous mine-hunting vessels, and to set up a military-industrial accelerator called NavyX.According to Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson, the initiative is designed to “allow the Royal Navy to rapidly harness dynamic, cutting-edge equipment at speed,” and to “ensure they can outpace adversaries both on the water and the sea floor.” The Ministry of Defence says that by fielding autonomous vehicles, they can put fewer sailors in danger.The initiative also includes the Royal Marines, and the partnership with Anduril Industries is designed to help with that modernization effort.According to Royal Navy chief technology officer Colonel Dan Cheeseman, the company is part of the accelerator program, and has partnered “with 3 Commando Brigade and they are now part of a busy exercise and deployment schedule.
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The UK’s largest mobile operators are reported getting tired of Government indecision, drafting a letter to Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill requesting clarification on the situation.The 5G world is fast approaching, but with the Government getting comfortable on the fence, no-one will want to make any investment decisions, a wrong-turn could prove to be very expensive.“We have robust procedures in place to manage risks to national security and are committed to the highest possible security standards.“The Telecoms Supply Chain Review will be announced in due course.We have been clear throughout the process that all network operators will need to comply with the Government’s decision.”What is worth noting is the BBC coverage perhaps reflects a sense of urgency which is not felt by the telcos.
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The United Kingdom may not have made a final decision as to whether to allow Huawei to play a restricted role in building this country’s 5G networks.In April it was reported in a British newspaper that the UK’s National Security Council (NSC) had agreed to allow Huawei limited access to help build parts of the network such as antennas and other “non-core” infrastructure.The leaking of the NSC decision to a British newspaper triggered an internal inquiry, and resulted in the sacking of UK’s then defence secretary Gavin Williamson, after the investigation pointed to him as being the guilty party for the leak.There has been intense lobbying efforts by the United States to pressure its allies to ban Huawei and other Chinese suppliers from participating in the build-out of 5G networks.And although the British NSC had decided to allow Huawei to build non-core aspects on the 5G network, a final decision was expected to be taken by the British cabinet of senior ministers in the past few weeks.It is reported however that due to the decision of Prime Minister Theresa May to step down on 7 June, this decision has been stalled, sources told Reuters.
US President Donald Trump’s national security adviser has said it is not clear the UK has reached a final decision on its policy towards Huawei.“I’m not sure that this decision has reached the prime ministerial level in final form.I mean we are still talking… people are talking back and forth,” John Bolton told reporters in London, Reuters reported.Read more: Pompeo ramps up rhetoric against Huawei over links to stateDetails leaked from a national security meeting last month revealed the UK is planning to ban Huawei from core parts of its 5G networks amid fears the tech firm’s equipment could be used for spying by Chinese authorities.But the government has not confirmed the leak, which led to the sacking of defence secretary Gavin Williamson, and has insisted it is yet to reach a final verdict on the issue.
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Huawei is planning to build a 400-person chip research and development factory in the centre of the UK's silicon chip industry, just outside of Cambridge.The Chinese telcoms group wants to develop the chips used in broadband networks at a base in Sawston, seven miles outside of Cambridge and just 15 minutes from Arm Holdings' headquarters, according to the Financial Times.Read more: The tangled Huawei web isn’t just about Gavin Williamson Chief executive of Huawei Technologies R UK, Henk Koopmans, said he purchased the 550-acre site for £37.5m last year.The facility, where former stationary business Spicers used to reside, is due to be operational by 2021 and would create around 400 jobs for the area.Huawei plans to build several tall buildings on the land and has said it could fund a new medical centre, bus stop or whatever the local residents wanted on an unused part of the site.The firm has also said it could eventually develop artificial intelligence there.
Often a figure of ridicule for the pet tarantula kept on his desk when he was chief whip, his former life as a fireplace salesman, and gaffes like saying Russia should “go away and shut up”, he was generally considered unashamedly brazen even by usual political standards in his ambitions to climb the greasy pole.As one Conservative insider put it to me: “he is like the product of an attempt to cross-breed all of the worst young Tories”.This goes some way towards explaining the mood of sensationalism that has swept over Westminster in the wake of Williamson’s abrupt departure on Wednesday.The rest of the firestorm is down to a heady cocktail of details that exemplify the current political climate: a leak from a National Security Council meeting (which is far more serious than from a general cabinet meeting), an inquiry that against all odds actually purported to have found the culprit in less than a week, and the first sacking of a cabinet minister for leaking in three decades, which makes him the 38th person to leave Theresa May’s government in just one year.The former defence secretary is swearing on his children’s lives that it wasn’t him who leaked the information, while opposition MPs are calling for a criminal investigation.Because while Williamson continues to proclaim his innocence and his opponents bay for his blood, the issue over which the leak occurred in the first place has firmly become last week’s news.
Gavin Williamson has been dismissed as defence secretary following "compelling evidence" that indicated he was the one to leak information from a national security council meeting.The leak detailed the government's plan to grant Huawei limited access to help develop the UK's impending 5G network.A pretty controversial plan in a climate where the US has accused Huawei of being funded by Chinese State Security.Huawei has received some mixed press of late.Of course you have the whole Chinese State Security thing, but they also donated a bunch of phones to the RSPCA so that they could take better pictures of adoptable critters.They also made the absolutely brilliant P30 Pro.
The now former Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson was sacked by Prime Minister Theresa May after she wrote in a letter that she believes he is responsible for the Huawei leak - accusations he has denied.May had come under fire after a leak from a private security meeting revealed she had approved the use of the Chinese manufacturer’s hardware for non-core elements of the UK’s 5G infrastructure.HuffPost is part of Oath.Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
UK Prime Minister Theresa May sacked her government's Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson on Wednesday after a leak about dealings with Chinese company Huawei.Last week the Telegraph reported that May, in a confidential National Security Council meeting of defense chiefs and security agencies, had given the green light to the scandal-scarred Chinese telecommunications giant working on "noncore" parts of the infrastructure.In February, the UK's Government Communications Headquarters chief criticized Huawei, saying it poses security threats from the Chinese government.Speaking to Parliament on Thursday, the government said the matter is "closed" and would not refer it to the police.But Labour deputy leader Tom Watson pointed out that "the prime minister has sacked the secretary of state for Defence because she believes there is compelling evidence he has committed a crime" and questioned how the government could block a criminal investigation.During May's Brexit-haunted tenure as prime minister, members of her cabinet have repeatedly leaked details from meetings to the press.
Met Police chief says Cabinet Office would need to refer the matter for an investigation to take place.HuffPost is part of Oath.Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
Gavin Williamson’s sacking as Defence Secretary was not just a great piece of political theatre, but it also demonstrated the seriousness at which the government is treating the future role of Huawei in the UK’s telecoms infrastructure.Politicians and the mobile industry have been waiting months for a final decision on whether Huawei will be allowed to supply operators with 5G radio equipment, leading to uncertainty.But if you believe what you read – and Williamson’s departure suggests you can – the cabinet is divided on the issue, fearing that Huawei is a threat to national security.Shenzhen-based Huawei was founded in the 1980s by Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the Chinese military.It bills itself as the first global Chinese company, with its innovative and competitively-priced network gear seeing it carve out significant market share in Asia and Europe.Huawei is also the world's second largest smartphone manufacturer, with shipments increasing by 50 per cent in the most recent quarter
Barcelona striker was firing on all cylinders, while the former defence secretary was just getting fired.HuffPost is part of Oath.Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
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The UK’s defence secretary Gavin Williamson has been sacked with immediate effect after an investigation pointed to him as being the guilty party for leaking the 5G decision about Huawei Technologies.For his part Williamson has strenuously denied being involved in the leak from the UK’s National Security Council (NSC), but the Prime Minister Theresa May made clear in her letter to him that an investigation pointed to him as being the culprit, and that he had not fully co-operated with the probe.The Prime Minister has appointed international development minister Penny Mordaunt to succeed Williamson as defence secretary.Prisons minister Rory Stewart was been appointed to Mordaunt’s former role.Last month Daily Telegraph reported that the UK’s National Security Council (NSC) had agreed to allow Huawei limited access to help build parts of the network such as antennas and other “non-core” infrastructure.Ever since 2010 the NSC meets weekly at the heart of government.
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It looks like the source of last week’s leak of the Government’s plans for the Huawei issue was the Defence Secretary himself.The leak, which was published by The Telegraph, revealed that the UK government is planning to go against US advice and allow some Huawei kit in non-core parts of the country’s 5G network.The US reckons any Huawei gear constitutes a potential security risk and has indicated it will cause diplomatic problems if any of its allies don’t do what they’re told on this matter.This was one of the main reasons why the leak was such a problem for the government, which immediately launched an investigation into the source of it.That investigation apparently concluded it came from the UK’s most senior security professional: Gavin Williamson, the Secretary of Defence.Prime Minister Theresa May consequently had no choice but sack him.
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“It is therefore with great sadness that I have concluded that I can no longer have full confidence in you as Secretary of State for Defence and a Minister in my Cabinet and asked you to leave Her Majesty’s Government.”Prime Minister Theresa May has sacked Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson for leaking details of a National Security Council meeting to the Daily Telegraph.The paper had reported that the government would be letting Chinese network hardware provider Huawei continue to sell components into the UK market.The report triggered a diplomatic crisis with the United States, which threatened to cut off intelligence sharing if Huawei was allowed to continue to operate in the UK.Gavin Williamson Sacked: The PM’s Letter in FullA letter from the PM to Williamson today read: “It is vital for the operation of good government and for the UK’s national interest in some of the most sensitive and important areas that the members of the NSC – from our Armed Forces, our Security and Intelligence Agencies, and the most senior level of Government – are able to have frank and detailed discussions in full confidence that the advise and analyis provided is not discussed or disclosed beyond that trusted environment.”
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Defence secretary Gavin Williamson has been removed from his role following an inquiry into allegations that he leaked information from a high-level National Security Council (NSC) meeting related to working with Huawei to build out the UK's 5G network.The inquiry came after reports surfaced over a plan to allow Huawei limited access to help build the UK's new 5G network despite growing security concerns surrounding the Chinese hardware maker.Williamson, who has served as defence secretary since 2017, continues to deny that he or his team leaked any information from the NSC.5G: How will businesses benefit?Downing Street has responded to the allegations by saying that the PM had “lost confidence in his ability to serve” and the role will now be filled by the former minister for international development Penny Mordaunt who will be the first woman to take on the position.During a meeting with Williamson this week, British Prime Minister Theresa May informed him that she had received intel that provided “compelling evidence” that he was responsible for the unauthorized disclosure.
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Defence secretary Gavin Williamson has been fired from the cabinet after an investigation into the leak of details of a National Security Council (NSC) meeting discussing Chinese tech firm Huawei.Prime Minister Theresa May wrote in a letter released today that "no other credible version of events to explain this leak has been identified".Williamson responded with a letter of his own denying he was the source of the leak."I am so sorry that you feel recent leaks from the National Security Council originated in my department.I emphatically believe this was not the case.I strenuously deny that I was in any way involved in this leak and I am confident that a thorough and formal inquiry would have vindicated my position."
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Denies wrongdoing, replaced by one-time junior MoD minister Penny MordauntUpdated Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson has been sacked from the British government after apparently leaking the news that Blighty isn’t completely banning Huawei from its 5G networks.Williamson is accused of being the source for a Daily Telegraph front-page story stating that the National Security Council, made up of senior Cabinet ministers, had decided to allow Huawei to supply equipment for the edge – but not the core – of the UK’s future 5G networks.The actual leak of the decision, on the same day that the decision was made, was of little interest to anyone outside the Westminster political bubble.Though Prime Minister Theresa May had made noises about a leak inquiry, nobody believed that her dead-duck premiership would actually follow it through, or have the teeth to score any sackings.A 10 Downing Street press statement about today's sacking said:
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The former international development secretary will be the first woman to lead the Ministry of Defence.HuffPost is part of Oath.Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
UK Prime Minister Theresa May sacked her government's Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson on Wednesday after information was leaked about the country's plans for using equipment made by Chinese company Huawei from a meeting of the National Security Council.Last week the Telegraph reported that May, in a confidential meeting of defense chiefs and security agencies, had given the green light to the scandal-scarred Chinese telecommunications giant working on "noncore" parts of the infrastructure.The decision to use Huawei equipment to build the UK's 5G infrastructure is far from straightforward.In February, the GCHQ's chief criticized Huawei over security threats it poses from the Chinese government.The US has continually warned its allies about security concerns with Huawei and Huawei was banned for 5G by the Australian government last August.The concerns stem around the Chinese government's interference with 5G infrastructure built by Huawei.
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