This fall, personal-genetics company 23andMe launched a new direct-to-consumer test that complies with the FDA's rules on personal-genetics testing.The new test gives information on everything from how much DNA you share with our Neanderthal ancestors to how much caffeine you likely consume.It also lets you know if you're carrying certain genetic variations related to diseases that you could pass on to your kids.I've been interested in what 23andMe is doing ever since I heard they were planning to develop drugs based on genetic information.But I was also curious to see what kind of diseases I might be at risk of passing down to my kids and whether the health concerns that run in my family could be spotted in my spit.Here's what it was like: View As:
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I have to admit: I've become a genetics geek.Ever since I sent my first saliva sample to be analyzed by consumer-genetics company 23andMe, I've become obsessed with what I can find out from a sample of my DNA.After trying out 23andMe's $199 test, I wanted to see how one of its competitors' tests stacked up.For $99, AncestryDNA will sequence your genes to help trace your geographic roots.It doesn't provide health and wellness information, although Ancestry launched a program aimed at tracking family-health history called AncestryHealth.The company also recently teamed up with Alphabet's biotechnology company, Calico, to study the genetics of the human lifespan.Here's what it was like to use AncestryDNA: View As:
Scientists track British genetic adaptation over 2,000 yearsNew research by geneticists working with data from the UK10K Project to study the genomes of 10,000 Britons has for the first time detailed exactly how the genetic traits of the people of the British Isles have evolved over the past 2,000 years Nature .Lockheed Martin plans Mars orbital lab for 2028Later today, Lockheed Martin is set to unveil details about its planned Mars Base Camp: a laboratory that will house six astronauts in orbit about Mars, which the company hopes to have in place by 2028 Popular Science .The system uses cameras, acoustic and radio frequency sensors to monitor stadia and business premises that could be at risk of unwanted drone activity.The camera connector just fits on the right-hand side of the Zero's board in what Raspberry Pi founder Eben Upton calls "dumb luck."Produced by Bruno Wu and producer Larry Kasanoff's Threshold Global Studios, Kasanoff says that it's an ensemble piece with a Chinese cast; the first part of a trilogy that's "not at all what you think; it will be a cool surprise."Book now for WIRED MoneyWIRED Money showcases the innovative thinkers who are re-imagining the financial sector.
Theranos' business model is built on the idea that it can offer more than 100 simple blood tests directly to patients at a much lower cost than traditional blood labs, ideally using its own technology to test that blood with only a finger-prick.But it has faced accusations about the validity of its technology since last year, and in January the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services found problems with its Northern California lab in January, saying some of its practices "pose immediate jeopardy to patient health and safety.Its founder Elizabeth Holmes said in a TV interview recently that, "we stopped testing and have taken the approach of saying, 'Let s rebuild this entire lab from scratch so that we can ensure it never happens again.Take a consumer genetics test, for example: Rather than making an appointment at the doctor, sitting for an array of expensive genetic tests, waiting days for the results and then having to trek back to the office to discuss them at your physician's convenience, the company offered a simple, straightforward alternative: Spit in a tube, mail it in, and get results online in a visual, simple-to-understand format.Theranos has been doing something similar, but with blood instead of spit."We've taken comprehensive corrective measures to address the issues CMS raised in their observations.Many "disruptive" Silicon Valley health companies have run into this regulatory problem as well.But because Theranos focuses on blood tests, which provide information that the average person could act on, like diagnosing a sexually transmitted disease or monitoring an existing diagnosis, Theranos faces an additional scrutiny.For example, a patient who had gotten a blood test through Theranos went to the emergency room in 2014 after a blood-test result that showed abnormally high results, The Journal reported."Holmes then went on to explain, in veiled terms, a bit about how the company runs its tests in an attempt to dispel some claims about dilution methods.
Instead of just issuing a report, the Academies wanted to make the source data available to the public in a searchable format.The committee that issued the report reviewed a collection of 900 existing reports covering GMO safety and health.The breadth and variety of data included in the report shows that a holistic understanding of GMOs requires a many-angled approach.All in all, the report concludes that there is no substantiated evidence that GMO organisms are less safe than non-modified crops.But that s not to say that the report ignores the potential dangers of unregulated GMO production.When it comes to GMOs, the slippery slope from genetics to eugenics is a real concern for scientists and concerned citizens alike.
Men who have lost the Y chromosome in a proportion of their blood cells are at higher risk of certain diseases. About 20 percent of men over 80 suffer from the loss of the Y chromosome in a proportion of blood cells, according to a press release. Women do not have a Y chromosome. The researchers hope that in future it should be possible to do a test to detect Y chromosome has been lost for identifying men at higher risk. The study was conducted on over 3200 men aged 37-96 years, and the results published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Get the news you're going to talk about in your Facebook feed - like Metro Sweden
JGI/Tom Grill via Getty ImagesMen who lack the Y chromosome in their blood cells are at greater risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer s disease, cancer and more.The researchers, who have published their findings in the American Journal of Human Genetics, believe that because women do not have a Y chromosome to lose they re less vulnerable to a range of different diseases.Biophoto Associates - via Getty ImagesIt s believed that the Y chromosome is crucial for a male human s immune system to operate fully and without it the body struggles to fight back against cancerous cells or the amyloid plaques which then lead to Alzheimer s disease.If it transpires that they are, preventative measures can be put in place whether that s a lifestyle change or a course of targeted medication to help better protect the body against these new threats.TanyaSv via Getty ImagesProf Lars Forsberg of Uppsala University explains: If we could predict which men have an increased risk of cancer, we could watch them closely for the development of disease and also use appropriate preventive treatments.In short, the widespread use of LOY testing could radically decrease male mortality rates, and even perhaps eliminate the difference in life expectancy between the sexes,
Mike Lynch, the scientific entrepreneur that sold his big data company Autonomy to HP for £7.4 billion, has criticised the way in which Google DeepMind has gone about working with the NHS.DeepMind — an AI research lab acquired by Google in January 2014 for around £400 million — announced in February that it was working with an NHS Trust in North London on a kidney monitoring app that can help clinicians diagnose patients.Through the partnership, DeepMind was quietly given access to full patient records for 1.6 million people, which included information about whether a person has contracted HIV, or whether they have had an abortion.DeepMind, which insists it followed all the necessary procedures, has also been criticised for failing to approach the UK's medicines and healthcare devices regulator, MHRA, beforehand and the deal is being investigated by the Information Commissioner's Office ICO ."It could have been done a little bit more carefully," he added.Lynch was speaking at the London offices of Invoke Capital, the fund he set up after selling Autonomy.Through that fund he has invested in a machine learning healthcare startup called Sophia Genetics.Lynch said healthcare can be significantly improved if hospitals embrace what he calls "data-driven medicine," which happens to be the same area that Sophia Genetics operates in."The true real use of data is not there as it should be," he continued."Sophia Genetics — a company with a platform that aims to speed up diagnosis and improve treatments for people with illnesses like cancer — is also working with several hospitals in the UK.The company's CEO, Jurgi Camblong, told Business Insider that it is compliant with all the necessary regulatory bodies' requirements across Europe.NOW WATCH: This smart earpiece translates languages as they are spokenLoading video...
Faception has already signed a contract with the US Homeland Security, yet experts remain cautious about the techAn Israeli startup claims to have developed new facial imaging technology which can identify anyone, be it poker players, geniuses, extroverts, terrorists or paedophiles, just by looking at a subject's face.Tel Aviv-based Faception has reportedly already signed a contract with US Homeland Security which will involve using the firm's facial recognition software to help identify terrorists.Faception has, so far, developed 15 classifiers which the firm claims can determine personality traits with 80% accuracy.The company's chief executive, Shai Gilboa, said: "We understand the human much better than other humans understand each other.The Israeli firm claims to back up its results and technology by using "social and life science research", citing a study conducted by Edinburgh University that examined the association between personality traits and genetics by studying identical and non-identical twins.Two of the firm's predictions turned out to be accurate, when they went on to be listed among the three finalists in the event.
With a single shot to the brain, researchers can rid rodents of all symptoms of the disease for months.Nevertheless, because FGF1 is naturally present in human brains, as well as those of rodents, researchers are hopeful that the lucky shot may translate into a useful treatment.The authors, led by researchers at the University of Washington, gave FGF1 a crack in animal brain experiments after other studies had seen encouraging results with FGF1 s cousins.Broken insulin production in the pancreas is the root of type 1 diabetes, and type 2 is spurred by an imbalance in insulin relative to the amount of sugar in the blood generally caused by poor diet, lack of exercise, and genetics .It s still unclear how exactly FGF1 spurs those changes.The authors speculate that working insulin signals may be a critical link between FGF1 s brain activity and the novel un-sweetening system in the liver and muscles.
Health data collected by wearable devices is a "big distraction" to doctors and clinicians, according to big data billionaire Mike Lynch, who says he has been working with the UK government on the issue of wearable health.Lynch, the scientific entrepreneur behind Autonomy, a big data company that was sold to HP for £7.4 billion in 2011, questioned what GPs are supposed to do when patients present them with data they have collected on their own wearable devices.Devices like the Apple Watch and the Fitbit can now track a person's heart rate and sleeping patterns while more niche wearables can monitor vital organ signs and perspiration levels."What the hell is a GP supposed to do with that data ?"Wearable devices will often give false alarms and the infrastructure isn't there for healthcare professionals to deal with the data they produce, Lynch added.Clinicians are being presented with increasing amounts of data, said Lynch, adding that the problem is "only going to get worse with this consumer empowerment."It s Silicon Valley VC money going into this kind of crazy over-instrumentation."Although Lynch is skeptical about using wearable data in healthcare, he is in favour of improving the way in which healthcare professionals utilise data in general.As a result, he's invested $13.75 million in a healthcare startup called Sophia Genetics, which has built a platform that analyses genomic data to help clinicians diagnose and treat diseases like cancer.Business Insider met with Lynch and Sophia Genetics cofounder and CEO Jurgi Camblong this week to find out where they see healthcare going in the future.A more indepth article from this encounter will be posted on Business Insider in due course.
When Alphabet Inc. Chairman Eric Schmidt looks to the near future, he sees breakthroughs in health and technology that will change the world.For example, Schmidt said he s looking forward to advances in genetics, thanks to technology that will improve gene sequencing, and more personalized and efficient health care as the medical world becomes increasingly digitized.The government should play a role in accelerating these developments as they ve done in the past, he said, pointing to initial public investment in Silicon Valley that allowed it to become the high-growth area it is today.Government spends an enormous amount of money on the wrong things, he said.I would just like to have a little bit of it on these things which are moonshots, enormous-scale things that can benefit the country.The company is still run by the two founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, who are demanding and have only become more so since the reorganization, he said.Under the Alphabet organization, the chief executive officers -- who are called characters and have a lot of independence -- are under pressure to prove they can build businesses and have incentives to deliver value, Schmidt said.Schmidt also pointed to Tel Aviv as a contender to become a hotbed of technological innovation.
And who gets to define the borderlands and boundaries of what we define as normal?What are the axes upon which we want to divide ourselves?Mukherjee and Crow engaged in a rapid back-and-forth that crossed centuries and academic disciplines and covered Mukherjee s family history of mental illness, the eugenics movement, the Nazis, the genetic engineering of wheat, science education, the maker movement as applied to genetics, the human fantasy of perfection and the personal histories of Gregor Mendel and Charles Darwin.We need to consider how wrong we ve been in the past.One of the purposes is emancipation from disease, replied Mukherjee, before rattling off the transformative impact of the language of genes on our health, from vaccine development to the treatment of breast cancer.Mukherjee said he didn t think the U.S. ever would have state-sanctioned eugenics.
Some of the public and private sector officials Jytyn sectoral areas of agreement was reached on a negotiated outcome under competitive agreement within the time limit, Jyty said in a statement. STTK of hon Jytyn highest decision-making body of the League accepted all achieved by the deadline negotiation results on Tuesday. Time will restrict myself far remained Jytyn to reach agreement on the private social services sector collective agreement, the collective agreement for the private education sector, vocational adult education centers in the collective agreement, the advice sector framework agreement, the collective agreement of the Finnish game center, FABA cooperative and Viking Genetics Finland Oy's collective agreement, Seure Personnel Services Ltd for the rent of the collective agreements and collective energy industry officials. The employer demanded an extension of the long working hours, whole days and cuts wanted by reducing annual leave. we represent areas KVTES: circuit in the local government sector that weekly working time is extended in all forms of working hours by 30 minutes. Other pain points in negotiations were kriisilauseke survival, ie, associated with local agreements working time banking issue, the trust status of men and access to information, as well as the competitiveness of the agreement in the first place belonged to public holiday pay for cutting 30 per cent of the deadline for the years 2017-2019.
There is no cure for MS, though treatments exists to manage symptoms and help speed recovery from attacks called remissions .Eventually, most people with this form of the disease will move on to a secondary progressive phase of MS in which symptoms begin a steady march and become increasingly severe.M signifies individuals with the mutation; black circles represent individuals with MS and age of disease onset; gray circles or squares denote individuals with the mutation whose health is unknown.In the two families studied, two-thirds of the patients with the mutation developed the progressive form of the disease.Some evidence even suggests that Vitamin D and smoking plays an important role.Lastly, this research could offer clues about the more common relapsing-remitting form of the disease, while also pointing to the possibility of using personalized medicine to treat MS. As Michelle Apperson from the University of California, Davis, pointed out, In the future, we may be able to look at a patient s genetic profile or other biomarkers and choose a medication that best fits that individual.
There is no cure for MS, though treatments exists to manage symptoms and help speed recovery from attacks called remissions .Eventually, most people with this form of the disease will move on to a secondary progressive phase of MS in which symptoms begin a steady march and become increasingly severe.M signifies individuals with the mutation; black circles represent individuals with MS and age of disease onset; gray circles or squares denote individuals with the mutation whose health is unknown.In the two families studied, two-thirds of the patients with the mutation developed the progressive form of the disease.Some evidence even suggests that Vitamin D and smoking plays an important role.Lastly, this research could offer clues about the more common relapsing-remitting form of the disease, while also pointing to the possibility of using personalised medicine to treat MS. As Michelle Apperson from the University of California, Davis, pointed out, In the future, we may be able to look at a patient s genetic profile or other biomarkers and choose a medication that best fits that individual.
There is no cure for MS, though treatments exists to manage symptoms and help speed recovery from attacks called remissions .Eventually, most people with this form of the disease will move on to a secondary progressive phase of MS in which symptoms begin a steady march and become increasingly severe.M signifies individuals with the mutation; black circles represent individuals with MS and age of disease onset; gray circles or squares denote individuals with the mutation whose health is unknown.In the two families studied, two-thirds of the patients with the mutation developed the progressive form of the disease.Some evidence even suggests that Vitamin D and smoking plays an important role.Lastly, this research could offer clues about the more common relapsing-remitting form of the disease, while also pointing to the possibility of using personalised medicine to treat MS. As Michelle Apperson from the University of California, Davis, pointed out, In the future, we may be able to look at a patient s genetic profile or other biomarkers and choose a medication that best fits that individual.
The precise origin of our canine companions is mired in controversy.But a new study suggests that dogs emerged from not one but two different populations of ancient wolves.What s more, this dual domestication happened on opposite sides of the Eurasian continent.Dogs first appeared about 15,000 years ago, long before the advent of agriculture, and represent the earliest known domestic animal.They emerged from ancient wolves, but scientists aren t entirely sure if this seminal domestication event happened in Europe or Asia.Their genetic signatures, including those of the Newgrange dog, were then compared to the genomes of more than 2,500 previously studied modern dogs.
A universal cancer vaccine is potentially within reach after scientists successfully demonstrated how our own bodies can be taught to kill cancer cells.The new therapy involves injecting tiny particles of engineered genetic code into the body which then effectively teach our own immune system how to recognise specific cancer cells.The team have so far only tested the therapy on mice and a few select human subjects.Tests on the mice found a strong immune system response against even the most aggressive cancers while the tests on humans were simply designed to prove that the therapy could be tolerated by the body with minimal side effects.It s a method which actually uses your body s own defenses to defeat the disease, which in turn then means it s less intrusive than other conventional treatments like chemotherapy.What this therapy effectively does is hack into the immune system and simply reprogramme the T-cells, so instead of fighting something like flu it starts attacking cancer cells instead.
In September, 2014, the silverback gorilla, 15 years old at the time, traveled from Brownsville, Texas to the Cincinnati Zoo to meet the female Western Lowland Gorillas Chewie and Mara.As the Internet outrage machine spews and sputters, Harambe s death clearly means different things to different people.Lowland gorillas are critically endangered, numbering just 100,000 in the wild.When he had gotten old enough to leave his family, facilities director Jerry Stones lobbied for Harambe to lead a troop.When Martha got too heavily pregnant to continue that, Harambe brought the baby to her each day.The Species Survival Plan doesn t just take into account genetics; representatives from the zoos also consider personalities and age.
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