Your browser does not support HTML5 videoPlayPausePlayPauseMute0%00:00 / 00:00FullscreenSmallscreen Close Embed Feed Israel and the US created the Flame computer virus IBTimes TVThe cyberespionage team going by the aliases Gaza Cybergang, Gaza Hackers Team or Molerats is making its comeback after shutting down all activities in January, when one of its active operations dubbed Operation DustSky was first exposed by security researchers.According to security firm ClearSky, which first discovered the group's activities on Operation DustSky in January 2016, the hacker group has been active since 2012 and is also believed to have developed custom malware like DownExecute and others that they then used to launch malicious campaigns against specific targets.I.e., malicious email messages are sent to selected targets rather than random mass distribution, but are not tailored specifically to each and every target.However, the attacks against targets in the Middle East except Israel were renewed in less than 20 days.Clues left behind by the hacker group have led security researchers to estimate fairly certainly that Hamas may be behind the cyberattacksClearSky also mentioned that during its short period of inactivity, at least one suspected member of the Gaza Cybergang attempted to get in touch with the security firm, in efforts to ascertain how much and what kind of information it had against them.The group was also discovered to have sent phishing emails to over 150 specific targets, focusing on attacking via private emails rather than professional ones.
A group of Israeli and American citizens is suing Facebook to the sum of $1 billion for allegedly facilitating fatal Palestinian militant attacks on their relatives.The victims include four Israeli-U.S. dual nationals, and one visiting U.S. citizen who were killed in several attacks that took place in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and the occupied West Bank between 2014, and 2016, reports Reuters.The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York accuses Facebook of assisting the operations of Hamas militants.The suit claims Facebook knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas … facilitat ing this terrorist group s ability to communicate, recruit members, plan and carry out attacks, and strike fear in its enemies .Hamas has thus far accepted responsibility for only one of the attacks, but the plaintiffs lawyer claims to have expert assessments linking the Palestinian organization to the other killings.Hamas, which assumed administrative control of the Gaza Strip after winning the 2006 legislative elections, is designated a terrorist group by the U.S. Consequently, the private lawsuit was brought under the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1992, which prohibits American businesses from providing material support to terrorist groups and their assailants.
The social media giant helps terrorists communicate and recruit, plaintiffs sayFamilies of victims of five recent terrorist attacks in Israel are suing Facebook.The families of victims of five recent attacks in Israel are suing Facebook for more than US$1 billion, saying the social media site helps terrorists plan their violence.The lawsuit, filed in a New York court, accuses Facebook of helping Palestinian group Hamas recruit members, communicate, and plan attacks.The U.S. government designated Hamas a terrorist organization in 1995.Plaintiffs in the lawsuit are family members of five terrorist attacks in Israel in the past two years, the most recent being a March 8 stabbing attack in Tel Aviv that killed 29-year-old U.S. citizen Taylor Force.
Lawyers filed a $1 billion lawsuit against Facebook Inc., alleging it allowed the Palestinian militant Hamas group to use it as a medium to carry out attacks that killed four Americans and wounded one in Israel, the West Bank and Jerusalem.Facebook has knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas in the form of Facebook s online social network platform and communication services, making it liable for the violence against the five Americans, according to the lawsuit sent to Bloomberg by the office of the Israeli lawyer on the case, Nitsana Darshan-Leitner.Simply put, Hamas uses Facebook as a tool for engaging in terrorism, it said.Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by the U.S., European Union and Israel.The suit said the group used Facebook to share operational and tactical information with members and followers, posting notices of upcoming demonstrations, road closures, Israeli military actions and instructions to operatives to carry out the attacks.In an e-mailed statement, Facebook said it doesn t comment on legal proceedings to the press.Mushir al-Masri, a senior Hamas leader, said by phone that suing Facebook clearly shows the American policy of fighting freedom of the press and expression and is evidence of U.S. prejudice against the group and its just cause.The suit was submitted to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York on July 10.
JERUSALEM -- Israeli and American families of victims of Palestinian attacks filed a $1 billion lawsuit against Facebook, claiming the social network is providing a platform for militants to spread incitement and violence, their lawyers said Monday.Shurat Hadin, an Israeli legal advocacy group, filed the suit on behalf of the five families in a New York court late Sunday, alleging that Facebook is violating the U.S. Anti-Terrorism Act by providing a service to militant groups that assists them in "recruiting, radicalizing, and instructing terrorists, raising funds, creating fear and carrying out attacks."The five families in the lawsuit lost relatives in attacks over the last two years.Four were dual Israeli-American citizens while one victim was an American tourist.She compared Facebook to a bank, saying just as money may be transferred as a service for terror groups, so can content.Israel says the violence is being fueled by a Palestinian campaign of incitement on social media while the Palestinians see it as the result of frustrations over nearly 50 years of Israeli occupation and a lack of hope for their own state.
Relatives of victims from five terrorist attacks in Israel, one as recent as this past March, are suing Facebook for having knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas, reports Reuters.The lawsuit represents four Israeli-American dual citizens and one visiting U.S. citizen and was filed with the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.The filing details the deaths of all five individuals and includes details into how Facebook was used to communicate or coordinate attacks.Other examples include screenshots of Palestinian propaganda supporting the killing of Israeli soldiers.According to Reuters, Darshan-Leitner, the law firm presenting the case, also filed for an injunction against Facebook in October to stop the social media giant from housing Palestinian incitement.However, Hamas reps say that Israeli soldiers equally celebrate the deaths of Palestinians on Facebook as well.
Hamas and its supporters have published images like this on Facebook.On Sunday, the families of several terrorist victims sued Facebook under an American anti-terrorism law.The victims died in multiple terrorist attacks in Israel in 2015 and 2016, and the families are seeking at least $1 billion in damages.The plaintiffs allege that the social networking giant is liable as it provides material support to Hamas—which the United States government considers a terrorist group—by allowing its leaders and followers to openly use the service.The case, known as Force v. Facebook, is the latest example of families attempting to use terrorism statutes as a way to shut down objectionable speech online and gain a monetary benefit for their deceased loved ones from social networks.None of the other efforts so far have been successful.
View photosMoreA 3D plastic representation of the Facebook logo is seen in this illustration in Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, May 13, 2015.JERUSALEM Reuters - A group of Israelis and Americans filed a lawsuit on Monday seeking $1 billion in damages from Facebook Inc. for allegedly facilitating deadly Palestinian militant attacks on their loved ones.The plaintiffs, relatives of four Israeli-U.S. dual nationals and one visiting U.S. citizen who died in attacks in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem or the occupied West Bank between 2014 and 2016, accused Facebook of helping Hamas militants operate.The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, argued that Facebook "knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas ... facilitat ing this terrorist group's ability to communicate, recruit members, plan and carry out attacks, and strike fear in its enemies".The social media giant did not respond directly to the lawsuit but said it stood by its regulations for preventing abusive content and a company representative in Israel said the company wanted "people to feel safe" when using Facebook."There is no place for content encouraging violence, direct threats, terrorism or hate speech on Facebook.
Israeli and American families of victims of Palestinian attacks have filed a US $1 billion lawsuit £770m against Facebook, claiming the social network is providing a platform for militants to spread incitement and violence, their lawyers have said.Shurat Hadin, an Israeli legal advocacy group, filed the suit on behalf of the five families in New York federal court, alleging that Facebook is violating US anti-terrorism laws by providing a service to militant groups that assists them in recruiting, radicalising, and instructing terrorists, raising funds, creating fear and carrying out attacks .The lawsuit focuses on the Islamic militant group Hamas, which governs the Gaza Strip and which has fought three wars against Israel since the Palestinian group took the coastal territory in 2007.The five families in the lawsuit lost relatives in attacks over the last two years.Four were dual Israeli-American citizens, while one victim was an American tourist.Israel says the violence is being fuelled by a Palestinian campaign of incitement on social media while the Palestinians see it as the result of frustrations over nearly 50 years of Israeli occupation and a lack of hope for their own state.
The families of Israeli and American victims killed in recent Palestinian attacks in Israel, the West Bank and Jerusalem have filed a $1bn £765m lawsuit against Facebook, alleging that the company has "knowingly provided material support and resources" to terrorist group Hamas.Filed in New York on 10 July, the suit claims that the social media giant violated US anti-terror laws by knowingly allowing Hamas to use its platform to incite violence and terrorist attacks."For years, Hamas, its leaders, spokesmen, and members have openly maintained and used official Facebook accounts with little or no interference," the lawsuit reads."Despite receiving numerous complaints and widespread media and other attention for providing its online social media platform and communications services to Hamas, Facebook has continued to provide these resources and services to Hamas and its affiliates.""Simply put, Hamas uses Facebook as a tool for engaging in terrorism.""For way too long, the social media companies have been allowed to believe that the anti-terrorism laws do not apply to them, that they have blanket immunity and they can do whatever they please," Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, an attorney for the plaintiffs, told ABC News.
A lawsuit filed against Facebook Inc. on behalf of terrorism victims in Israel illustrates some of the complications of going to court to remedy violent radicalism.Fortunately, there s a better way to address the problem of militants exploiting social media.Lawyers for the victims sued Facebook in Manhattan federal court on Monday, seeking $1 billion in damages.They alleged that the U.S. company allowed Palestinian militants affiliated with Hamas, branded by the U.S. government as a terrorist organization, to use the online service to plan attacks that killed four Americans and wounded another in Israel, the West Bank, and Jerusalem."Simply put, Hamas uses Facebook as a tool for engaging in terrorism," the lawyers wrote.The suit alleged that Hamas has used Facebook to share operational information and instructions for carrying out attacks.Whatever one's position on the Middle East conflict, it's fair to say that the suit against Facebook faces some serious legal hurdles.First, there is the so-called safe harbor provision of the Communications Decency Act.
A lawsuit accusing Twitter of helping the rise of ISIS and contributing to the death of an American contractor in a Jordan attack last year has been revised for a second time and filed anew after being struck down earlier this month.In the original suit filed in January, the family of Lloyd Carl Fields, Jr. said Twitter knowingly permitted the terrorist group ISIS to use its social network as a tool for spreading extremist propaganda, raising funds and attracting new recruits.In the revised lawsuit filed Tuesday and a previous revise filed in March , the family of another contractor, James Damon Creach, who died in the same attack in November, is also listed as a plaintiff.A couple of weeks ago, Twitter announced that it has closed down 235,000 terrorism-related accounts in the past six months.The plaintiffs mentioned that and other recent anti-terrorism efforts by the San Francisco company, but said in the lawsuit filed Tuesday: Still, to this day, Twitter permits groups designated by the U.S. government as Foreign Terrorist Organizations to maintain official accounts, including Hamas @hamasinfo and @HamasInfoEn and Hizbollah @almanarnews .The plaintiffs also charge that Twitter s direct-messaging capability is no different than handing ISIS a satellite phone, walkie-talkies or the use of a mail drop, all of which terrorists use for private communications in order to further their extremist agendas.In the ruling dismissing the lawsuit a couple of weeks ago, Judge William Orrick of the Northern District of California wrote: Apart from the private nature of Direct Messaging, plaintiffs identify no other way in which their Direct Messaging theory seeks to treat Twitter as anything other than a publisher of information provided by another information content provider.The Verge notes that the plaintiffs charges about Twitter s DM feature could be key:A Twitter spokesman told SiliconBeat the company has no comment on the revised lawsuit.
A federal judge slammed Facebook Inc., saying the social media giant might not be doing enough to deter terrorists from using its platform.U.S.District Judge Nicholas Garaufis in Brooklyn, New York, also accused Facebook s lawyers -- by sending a first-year associate to a hearing -- of not taking seriously lawsuits with implications of international terrorism and the murder of innocent people.The judge ordered Kirkland & Ellis LLP, the law firm representing Facebook, to send a more senior lawyer to the next hearing on Sept. 28 because he wanted to talk to someone who talks to senior management at Facebook.Garaufis is overseeing two lawsuits in which more than 20,000 victims of attacks and their families accused Facebook of helping groups in the Middle East such as Hamas.The judge noted similar suits haven t been successful under U.S. law which insulates publishers from liability for the speech of others.But he said that doesn t mean Facebook shouldn t take it seriously and try to address the issue.Isn t the social media platform basically putting together people who d like to be involved in terrorism with people are are terrorists?
Days after a judge chastised a law firm representing Facebook Inc. for sending only a junior associate to court in a case alleging the company doesn t do enough to deter terrorists, a team of five attorneys was dispatched to apologize.We feel badly," Craig Primis, a partner at Kirkland & Ellis LLP, told U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis on Tuesday.Garaufis, who sits in Brooklyn, New York, is overseeing two lawsuits in which more than 20,000 victims of attacks and their families accuse Facebook of helping groups in the Middle East such as Hamas.Last week Garaufis questioned Facebook s "moral obligation" to remove terrorist postings and said he wanted to "talk to someone who talks to senior management at Facebook.Primis, whose legal posse included two partners and the associate, told Garaufis he d also brought along Paul Grewal, Facebook s deputy general counsel and a former federal magistrate judge in Northern California, to explain how the company views terrorist postings."Facebook has every intention of keeping terrorists off Facebook," Grewal told the judge."We have people working around the world, 24-7, investigating reports of violent statements.
The hacking group has been dubbed Moonlight due to references in codeA hacking group is conducting cyberespionage against targets in the Middle East by duping politicians, activists and staff at NGOs into clicking links to authentic-looking but fake versions of high-profile websites in the region, and then infecting them with malware.The operation -- dubbed 'Moonlight' by cybersecurity researchers, after the name the attackers chose for one of their command-and-control domains -- has generated over two hundred samples of malware over the past two years and targets individuals via their private email accounts instead of their corporate ones, to increase the chances of a successful attack.The attacks, which are themed around Middle Eastern political issues such as the war in Syria or the conflict in Palestine, have been unearthed by cybersecurity researchers at Vectra Networks, who say the tools and targets are reminiscent of the Gaza Hacker Team, a group of hacktivists said to be aligned with Hamas, the Palestinian militant Islamic group.The attacks are purely centred on Middle Eastern targets, with the text crafted in Arabic.It isn't sophisticated, but the effort the attackers put into their phishing attacks means that it's effective.
View photosMoreAn Israeli soldier speaks on a mobile phone with his mother while walking alongside a beach near the city of Nahariya August 15, 2006.TEL AVIV Reuters - Using photos of young women and Hebrew slang, the Palestinian militant group Hamas chatted up dozens of Israeli soldiers online, gaining control of their phone cameras and microphones, the military said on Wednesday.An officer, who briefed reporters on the alleged scam, said the Islamist group that runs the Gaza Strip uncovered no major military secrets in the intelligence-gathering operation.Mainly using Facebook, Hamas used fake online identities and photos of young women, apparently found on the Internet, to lure soldiers in, the officer said."Just a second, I'll send you a photo, my dear," one "woman" wrote."OK. Ha-ha," the soldier replied, before a photo of a blonde woman in a swimsuit popped up.
The Israeli military published conversations between the scammers and soldiersIsrael's military says it has uncovered a scam by Hamas militants to spy on its soldiers by hacking their mobile phones after posing as women on social media.Members of the Palestinian group found the soldiers online, then tried to strike up a friendship using the fake identities, an officer told reporters.Dozens of soldiers were persuaded to install an application that controlled their phone cameras and microphones.However, the officer said Hamas was not able to uncover any major secrets.Most of the soldiers were low-ranking, he added, and the scammers were interested in information about Israeli army manoeuvres, forces and weaponry around the Hamas-dominated Gaza Strip.
Long sought by the Iraqi government, Abu Islam was notorious for running clandestine cells of suicide bombers—some of whom were as young as twelve—and carrying out covert terrorist operations beyond the Islamic State’s borders.Having had a few years of religious training, he was also tasked with teaching the unique ISIS version of Islam to new fighters.Most of the ISIS élite have fled or been killed since Iraq launched its most ambitious military offensive, late last year, to retake Mosul.In four decades covering the Middle East, I’ve interviewed the leaders of Hezbollah, Hamas, and the rank-and-file of many other militant groups.Unlike most foreign fighters who joined the Islamic State, the majority of Iraq’s homegrown militants came from villages and farms, intelligence officials told me.His captors allowed the family visit to soften him up for interrogation.
p A federal judge on Thursday dismissed two lawsuits seeking to hold Facebook liable for supporting terrorist groups by letting them use its social media platform to further their goals, including violence against Jews.US District Judge Nicholas Garaufis in Brooklyn dismissed a US$3 billion damages lawsuit by relatives of American victims of Hamas attacks, saying the federal Communications Decency Act regulating internet content immunises Facebook from liability.That law “prevents courts from entertaining civil actions that seek to impose liability on defendants like Facebook for allowing third parties to post offensive or harmful content or failing to remove such content once posted,” Garaufis wrote.Garaufis also dismissed a lawsuit by roughly 20,000 Israeli citizens who feared harm from future violence.He said they had no legal right to seek changes to Facebook’s platform because they could not show any “actual or imminent” injury.The decision is a setback to efforts to hold operators of online platforms such as Facebook and Twitter liable for failing to better police speech by their users.
p Two lawsuits seeking to hold Facebook responsible for terrorism groups' use of the social media platform have been dismissed by a federal judge.The plaintiffs in Force v. Facebook, filed last year, are the families and estates of US citizens who were killed by Hamas, a Palestinian organization that is considered a terrorist group by the US government.The plaintiffs group also included one victim who was injured but survived.They sought $1 billion in damages, claiming (PDF) that by providing social media services to Hamas, Facebook had violated the US Anti-Terrorism Act, which forbids the "provision of material support" to officially designated terrorism groups.The plaintiffs complained that Facebook's approach to expunging Hamas material from the Web was "piecemeal and inconsistent."Yesterday, US District Judge Nicholas Garaufis ruled (PDF) that Facebook was protected by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which generally prevents online platforms from being held liable for the actions of their users.
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