As of today, New York s Momofuku Nishi restaurant has become the first eatery to serve Impossible Foods animal-free burger as part of its regular restaurant menu.While veggie burgers have, of course, been served in dining establishments for years — often inspiring smug or pitying looks from the more carnivorous patrons — this particular burger earns its spot on Digital Trends Cool Tech page by virtue of tasting and behaving remarkably like real beef — even down to the blood.That s thanks to the secret ingredient of heme, a molecule which is more commonly used to give blood both its red color and iron flavor think hemoglobin!Thanks to heme, Impossible Burgers taste infinitely more meaty than the mocking vegetable patty normally served to us plant-eaters.Best of all, while it delivers comparable protein and iron to conventional beef, it contains no cholesterol, hormones, or antibiotics.Last but not least, producing the Impossible Burger requires just one-quarter of the water used to produce the same burger from a cow, a twentieth of the land, and an eighth of the greenhouse gas emissions.
When it comes to keeping track of diabetes, the manual process can be a bit of a pain.Healthtech startup Health2Sync, which launched at the Hardware Battlefield at CES 2014, wants to change all that with a cheap accessory that connects to most standard glucose meters and syncs your blood glucose levels straight to your phone.The company announced today it has secured a $3 million Series A round led by WI Harper Group, with participation in the round by Cherubic Ventures, iSeed Ventures and SparkLabs Global Ventures.According to the company s press release, Health2Sync will use the funding to continue product development and accelerate growth overseas in markets like Japan, China and Southeast Asia.At its core, the Health2Sync is a cable that connects your smartphone to your glucose meter via the headphone jack to get the two devices talking.Once these devices are connected, data stored on your glucose meter will sync with your smartphone via the Health2Sync app.
Sure, the built-in flash on your smartphone is good for lighting up dark scenes, but it can also help diagnose anemia.A team of engineers and computer scientists from the University of Washington have developed a new app that uses a light source — like the built-in camera flash — to estimate hemoglobin levels.In a small trial with 31 participants, HemaApp has proven to be about as successful at measuring hemoglobin levels as the finger sensor approved by the Food and Drug Administration.According to the study, shining a light source through a patient s finger allows the smartphone camera, paired with the app, to analyze the color and give a pretty good estimate on hemoglobin.The app takes a series of videos while exposing the patient s finger to different wavelengths of light, then compares the results from the different light levels to detect hemoglobin levels.Study authors say it won t replace a finger prick and an actual blood test, but the program could be used to easily and non-invasively screen patients to determine whether or not additional testing is needed.
Until now, the key to conquering Everest and other similar 8,000-kilometer peaks has been altitude acclimation at a series of base camps.Climbers often spend weeks and sometimes even months at these higher-elevation camps to force their bodies to produce new red blood cells that are more efficient at carrying oxygen.That s been the story for 50 years, says Robert Roach, a lead investigator at University of Colorado s Altitude Research Center, to Science.This long-held practice is being challenged thanks to new research by Roach that suggests the body begins adapting to high elevations almost immediately, and that these changes persist for weeks even when the person returns to low altitudes.For his AltitudeOmics, study, Roach and his team recruited 20 young people, brought them to Bolivia and dropped them on the summit of Mount Chacaltaya, a 5421-meter peak in the Andes.By the end of the two weeks, everyone could finally complete the hike.
Xing had discovered eight fully preserved vertebrae from a young, non-avian dinosaur called a coelurosaur.As an adult it would have been about the size of an ostrich, but this juvenile was still tiny enough to get trapped in tree sap and never escape.After Xing convinced the Dexu Institute of Paleontology to buy the amber, he and an international group of colleagues in China, England, and Canada examined it closely, using a number of imaging techniques that allowed them to generate 3-D reconstructions of the tail structure.Xing worked on imaging the tail with Ryan McKellar of the Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Canada.In a statement, McKellar confirmed it is unmistakably a dinosaur: "We can be sure of the source because the vertebrae are not fused into a rod or pygostyle as in modern birds and their closest relatives.Chemical analysis of the remains also showed traces of iron, meaning that it probably contained hemoglobin when the dinosaur was alive.
Sickle cell disease is a slow, vicious killer.But those years are a lifetime of pain, as abnormal, crescent-shaped haemoglobin stops up blood flow and deprives tissues of oxygen, causing frequent bouts of agony, along with more severe consequences like organ damage.Now, after decades of searching for a cure, researchers are announcing that, in at least one patient, they seem to have found a very promising treatment.Two years ago, a French teen with sickle cell disease underwent a gene therapy treatment intended to help his red blood cells from “sickling.” In a paper published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers revealed that today, half of his red blood cells have normal-shaped haemoglobin.To reiterate, the paper is a case study of just one patient.Bluebird Bio, the Massachusetts biotech company that sponsored the clinical trial, has treated at least six other trials underway in the US and France, but those results have not yet been fully reported.
Sickle cell disease is a slow, vicious killer.But those years are a lifetime of pain, as abnormal, crescent-shaped haemoglobin stops up blood flow and deprives tissues of oxygen, causing frequent bouts of agony, along with more severe consequences like organ damage.Now, after decades of searching for a cure, researchers are announcing that, in at least one patient, they seem to have found a very promising treatment.Two years ago, a French teen with sickle cell disease underwent a gene therapy treatment intended to help his red blood cells from “sickling.” In a paper published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers revealed that today, half of his red blood cells have normal-shaped haemoglobin.To reiterate, the paper is a case study of just one patient.Bluebird Bio, the Massachusetts biotech company that sponsored the clinical trial, has treated at least six other trials underway in the US and France, but those results have not yet been fully reported.
p Another day, another study showing how awful microgravity is to the human body.As noted in the study, which you can check out at the Journal of Applied Physiology, this seems to be happening because our heart and small blood vessels suck at transporting oxygen to working muscles under microgravity conditions.Discouragingly, the effect still matters when astronauts try to maintain a high degree of fitness in space, by riding stationary bikes and running on treadmills.Prior to embarking on their missions, each astronaut had various health measures taken to assess their physical fitness, including oxygen uptake, cardiac output, and hemoglobin concentration and saturation.(Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein responsible for transporting oxygen in your blood.)While in space, each astronaut followed an aerobic and resistance training regimen designed by NASA.
PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Computer models developed by Brown University mathematicians show new details of what happens inside a red blood cell affected by sickle cell disease.The researchers said they hope their models, described in an article in the Biophysical Journal, will help in assessing drug strategies to combat the genetic blood disorder, which affects millions of people worldwide.Sickle cell disease affects hemoglobin, molecules within red blood cells responsible for transporting oxygen.In sickle red blood cells, mutated hemoglobin can polymerize when deprived of oxygen, assembling themselves into long polymer fibers that push against the membranes of the cells, forcing them out of shape.The stiff, ill-shaped cells can become lodged in small capillaries throughout the body, leading to painful episodes known as sickle cell crisis."There had been separate models for each of these things individually developed by us, but this brings those together into one comprehensive model."
Left untreated, malaria can progress from being mild to severe -- and potentially fatal -- in 24 hours.So researchers at the University of British Columbia developed a method to quickly and sensitively assess the progression of the mosquito-borne infectious disease, which remains a leading killer in low-income countries.One way malaria wreaks havoc on the body is by causing excessive amounts of toxic heme, the non-protein component of hemoglobin, to accumulate in the bloodstream.Among other things, this free heme induces oxidative stress in red blood cells (RBCs), leading to their rigidification, destruction and subsequent removal from circulation -- a condition known as hemolytic anemia.In their study, which appeared in Integrative Biology, the UBC investigators found that RBCs become increasingly rigid in direct correlation with the concentration of oxidized heme, or hemin, in the blood.Since hemin is difficult to measure directly -- it tends to insert itself into cell membranes -- monitoring changes in RBC deformability can therefore serve as a reliable alternative marker of hemin-induced oxidative stress and malaria progression.
GeekWire reports that Google has acquired Senosis, a Seattle-based startup that’s been making mobile apps to identify and monitor health conditions without the need for additional hardware.Fronted by Shwetak Patel, a computer science and electrical engineering professor at the University of Washington, the company has developed tools to detect jaundice in infants and measure hemoglobin in your blood (to screen for diseases like anaemia) using just your phone’s camera.Another app uses the mic to help diagnose lung problems like asthma and cystic fibrosis.If approved by health regulatory agencies, these apps could make it easy to deploy wellness solutions in developing countries without the need for expensive hardware, testing labs and accompanying personnel.The acquisition will likely help Google boost its efforts to tackle health issues as part of the company’s plans for world domination.Its AI firm, DeepMind, has been working on machine learning tech to detect eye conditions and help fight blindness.
Google looks to be deepening its focus on health tech with the acquisition of a startup that specializes in health-monitoring apps for smartphones.Seattle-based startup Senosis was founded by Shwetak Patel, a professor of computer science and electrical engineering at the University of Washington.The disease is typically known for its effect on the color of a baby’s skin, turning it yellow.This app uses a combination of a smartphone’s camera and flash to measure the amount of bilirubin (the yellow compound that causes jaundice) in the blood by examining wavelengths of light absorbed by the skin.Another Senosis app that uses the smartphone’s camera is HemaApp, which measures the levels of hemoglobin (the protein responsible for carrying oxygen) in the blood.An accurate reading of hemoglobin measurement can help to identify a wide range of health conditions including anemia, malnutrition and heart disease.
Artificial intelligence helps with earlier detection of skin cancerNew technology being developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo and the Sunnybrook Research Institute is using artificial intelligence (AI) to help detect melanoma skin cancer earlier.The technology employs machine-learning software to analyze images of skin lesions and provide doctors with objective data on telltale biomarkers of melanoma, which is deadly if detected too late, but highly treatable if caught early.The AI system--trained using tens of thousands of skin images and their corresponding eumelanin and hemoglobin levels--could initially reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies, a significant health-care cost.The technology could be available to doctors as early as next year."This could be a very powerful tool for skin cancer clinical decision support," said Alexander Wong, a professor of systems design engineering at Waterloo.
Doctors are hoping that artificial intelligence could be the key to detecting signs of melanoma skin cancer far earlier than the current methods of diagnosis allow.The machine-learning software, developed by the University of Waterloo, Canada, would hopefully shorten the current process which relies entirely on patients presenting lesions (such as moles) and doctors then judging them on their appearance alone.If they deem them to be potentially hazardous, patients than require a biopsy to get more information.Professor Alexander Wong, who worked on the study, said: “There can be a huge lag time before doctors even figure out what is going on with the patient.”Instead, the AI would anaylse images of the lesions, and look for telltale biomarkers of cancer that it has been taught through studying tens of thousands of images, and then it could provide doctors with objective data to make a decision.The signs it is looking out for would include changes in the concentration and distribution of eumelanin (a chemical that gives skin its colour), and hemoglobin, both strong indicators that a melanoma is present.
At the 14th International Conference on Image Analysis and Recognition, a team of researchers presented an AI-based system, which can detect skin cancer earlier than current methods of diagnosis.The new method, developed by researchers from the University of Waterloo, uses a machine-learning software that analyses images of skin lesions, such as moles, and looks for biomarkers of melanoma, a form of skin cancer, which can also prove deadly if detected too late.It then follows an appearance-based approach to match these lesions with tens of thousands of skin images.The system targets strongest indicators of cancer and looks for changes in concentration and distribution of eumelanin –a chemical which defines skin colour– and hemoglobin levels.Finally, it combines that data with consistent, quantitative information and hands out a report, detailing characteristic information of the abrasions to help doctors decide whether a patient should undergo expensive biopsies to diagnose the disease."This could be a very powerful tool for skin cancer clinical decision support," said Alexander Wong, a professor who worked on the study.
WASHINGTON, D.C., Oct. 3, 2017 -- About one quarter of the world's population suffers from anemia, a disease caused by a concentration deficiency of hemoglobin in red blood cells.To reduce the burden of anemia, health officials need a better picture of the disease's global impact, an understanding made viable by a portable and affordable way to analyze blood.Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body.This technique requires hands-on expertise to prepare and run a sample, limiting the ability to monitor anemia in many parts of the world."The most exciting aspect to this analyzer is that it uses whole blood and does not require the additional steps and reagents to prepare a sample," said Nathan Sniadecki, associate professor in mechanical engineering at the University of Washington and one of the authors."You just run blood into the channel and that's it," said Nikita Taparia, a doctoral candidate in Snaidecki's lab and another author.
An anonymous reader shares a report: Scientists have been working on creating synthetic blood for years now.The hope is that this substance will have a longer shelf life than human blood -- which can only be refrigerated for 42 days -- and eventually can be packaged and stored for use in emergencies.If this works, thousands of lives could be saved every year."People can't show up fast enough and then the system can't draw their blood fast enough to meet the need," said Allan Doctor, a physician and researcher at the Washington University in St. Louis.Doctor's lab has been working to create a blood substitute called ErythroMer, comprised of human hemoglobin, sourced from the red blood cells in expired blood at blood banks, and a synthetic polymer.This synthetic blood is actually a dehydrated powder, which would allow it to be stored for years, rather than weeks, and easily transported.
TSU scientist Rashid Valiev and colleagues from the universities of Helsinki and Oslo have discovered a new type of rare molecules whose properties can be controlled by changing the induction of an external magnetic field.These are paramagnetic molecules from the class porphyrins.Porphyrins are part of hemoglobin and chlorophyll and are closely related to the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in living organisms.The results of the study were published in the journal Chemical Communications of the Royal British Chemical Society.Open paramagnetic porphyrins with a closed electron shell are very rare molecules, because they have a specific electronic structure.Usually, molecules with such a structure are very unstable, and open porphyrins, on the contrary, are unchanged even in the air around us.
There has been quite a bit of good news lately for diabetes patients.From a stem cell-based implant that could serve as a functional cure for some folks to a glucose monitoring device that obviates the need for finger pricks, science and technology are helping millions of folks worldwide conquer the disease.Now, the latest innovation comes in the form of an artificial pancreas, which allows patients to control their insulin levels with a smartphone.A total of 30 patients with Type 1 diabetes participated in a 12-week trial of the novel system and researchers found “significant improvements in two key measures of well-being in people living with Type 1 diabetes,” namely decreased hemoglobin A1c and reduced time spent in hypoglycemia.Thanks to the combination of the man-made pancreas and smartphone algorithms, patients were more easily able to monitor their blood glucose levels and administer insulin either using a needle or infusion pump.Per a Harvard Universtiy release detailing the trial, “The artificial pancreas is designed to mimic a healthy person’s glucose regulating function.
She then sent those vials to Quest Diagnostics for its Blueprint for Athletes test, which promised to reveal crucial information about how the biomarkers in my blood related to my athletic performance.In the age of the quantified self, any athlete willing to pony up $139 (or more for a more advanced test) can skip her doctor and turn directly to her data.Blueprint for Athletes is only one of numerous direct-to-consumer blood tests targeted at athletes — others include Fuelary, WellnessFX, Athlete Blood Test and Inside Tracker, a company that likens its blood tests to “a selfie from the inside.” The implication is that your blood contains crucial information that you need to know.As Fuelary founder Josh Shadle put it to me, “There could be things going on that you don’t know.I received results from 43 tests — including measures of red and white blood cell counts, glucose, triglycerides, hemoglobin, cortisol, cholesterol and vitamin D. Two of my test values, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and creatinine, were marked in red — outside of the normal range.My results came with an appointment with Bunny Foxhoven, a registered dietitian nutritionist and senior clinical educator for Quest.1
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