Boris Johnson’s planning reforms have been left in “tatters” following the Tories’ humiliating by-election defeat in Chesham and Amersham, a veteran MP has said.Sir Roger Gale told HuffPost UK the defeat was a “wake up call” for the prime minister amid a significant backbench rebellion over the plans, which MPs fear would concentrate house building in the party’s southern heartlands.The Liberal Democrats took the Buckinghamshire seat for the first time in its history, winning a majority of 8,028 over the Tories on a stunning 25% swing.The party focused heavily on the planning reforms in leaflets the seat, quoting Tory rebels including Theresa May attacking the policy.Here it is. The anti-planning reform leaflet the Libs were handing out during the Chesham by-election.Quotes from Theresa May (pictured) and IDS criticising the reforms. (One Tory MP who visited a dozen times told me these ‘cut through’) pic.twitter.com/MmSSq0W44S— Ben Riley-Smith (@benrileysmith) June 18, 2021The defeat has now intensified the rebellion, as MPs fear the pattern could be repeated across so-called “blue wall” southern traditional Tory seats.Gale said that on Tory WhatsApp groups on Friday “the only thing anybody is talking about is planning”.“The common theme is ‘me too, me too, me too’ - right across the south of England,” he told HuffPost UK.“They are worried about the policy.“But of course they’ve got an eye on their reelection chances.”Johnson on Friday stressed that there has been “misunderstanding” about the reforms, insisting the government would not build on green belt land.“What we want is sensible plans to allow development on brownfield sites,” he said. “We’re not going to build on green belt sites, we’re not going to build all over the countryside.”But Gale said the rebels were concerned about building on greenfield sites like agricultural land, stressing: “We’re not talking about green belt.” The policy is in tatters He backed calls for the government to instead focus on building houses on brownfield sites, empty commercial properties, and forcing developers to build on around a million unused planning consents.On the upcoming planning bill, he said: “My personal view is: the policy is in tatters.“They’ve got to wake up and smell the coffee.”It came as leading rebel Bob Seely said the by-election result was “the start of a significant push-back from communities on planning”.“Relentless housing targets - very often the wrong housing in the wrong areas - just feeds the hamster wheel of planning doom,” he told the BBC.“We need a better way of doing things. “We want to work with government to make this a success.  “But more of them same will be political suicide, and, as Winston Churchill said, the problem with political suicides is that you live to regret them.”Johnson is facing fresh rebellion over planning after MPs on his own side last year effectively killed off a so-called “mutant algorithm”, which would have dramatically increased house-building in southern Tory cities and shires.But the PM is believed to think home ownership is key to cementing the party’s gains in the so-called “red wall” in the north and Midlands and returned with fresh proposals to overhaul planning in last month’s Queen’s Speech.The government has said it wants to speed up the planning process to deliver new homes and infrastructure more quickly, at the same time as protecting the environment, as part of efforts to hit Johnson’s target of building 300,000 homes a year by the mid-2020s.But Tory rebels and countryside campaigners have warned that the bill will divide places into areas earmarked for either growth or protection, and that growth areas would undermine local democracy and give developers a green light to build on rural land.Related...Lib Dems Score Stunning 'Blue Wall' By-Election Victory Over Boris Johnson'Senior Lib Dem and Labour Reject “Progressive Alliance” To Beat ToriesTories’ Culture War Going Down Like A ‘Lead Balloon’ In ‘Blue Wall’
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A senior Liberal Democrat and Labour have rejected the possibility of a “progressive alliance” to get the Tories out of government at the next general election.But Lib Dem health spokesperson Munira Wilson told HuffPost UK the two parties could agree to some “campaigning cooperation” by keeping activists out of marginal seats they cannot win.Wilson spoke to HuffPost UK’s Commons People podcast on the eve of the party inflicting a humiliating shock by-election defeat on the Tories in the so-called “blue wall” seat of Chesham and Amersham.There was a huge 25% swing to the Lib Dems, who won a majority of 8,028 over the second-placed Tories, while Labour was left trailing in fourth."Do you know what happens when a really powerful orange force goes against a blue wall?" Lib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey celebrates his party's historic win in Chesham and Amershamhttps://t.co/HQIsg7dJwppic.twitter.com/f9XKMcmhEl— BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) June 18, 2021The result sparked fresh discussion on whether the two sides could agree a progressive alliance - standing down in seats they cannot win to give the other party a clearer run at the Tories.But a Labour source rejected the idea that the parties could “game the system”.Wilson also suggested a formal alliance would “backfire”.But she raised the prospect of the kind of looser cooperation agreed by Tony Blair and Lib Dem leader Paddy Ashdown in the Nineties, where each side would not fight hard in the other’s target seats.She told Commons People: “For a start, we don’t own any voters so I don’t subscribe to this idea that if a Liberal Democrat stands down in a Conservative/Labour marginal all our votes will suddenly go to the Labour Party and vice versa if they stood down for us.“Because there’s plenty of soft Conservatives who will vote Liberal Democrat but if we weren’t standing would not vote for the Labour Party.“So I think what worked incredibly well when you look back to the late 90s was when you had Ashdown and Blair sort of having an agreement that in your marginal seats... take our activists and put them into our own marginal contests and keep them away from those areas that we can’t win.“And that did not happen in 2019, which is why the Lib Dems... could have picked up a few more seats.“I think about places like Finchley and Golders Green and Cities of London and Westminster, where we came really close.“But because they had Labour defectors standing, Momentum purposely sent in hordes of activists to stop the Lib Dems winning - they would rather have Conservative MPs than a Lib Dem MP for their own ideological reasons.“So I hope there can be some of that sort of obvious campaigning cooperation.“I don’t think those alliances where we’re standing down for each other necessarily work, and I think they backfire.”Asked about the prospect of a progressive alliance, a Labour source said: “Look at the number of places where the Lib Dems and the Greens prop up Tory councils to keep Labour out. “The idea of a progressive alliance is a total myth from people who think you can somehow game the system.”Related...Lib Dems Score Stunning 'Blue Wall' By-Election Victory Over Boris Johnson'Tories’ Culture War Going Down Like A ‘Lead Balloon’ In ‘Blue Wall’Starmer Critic Howard Beckett Pulls Out Of Race To Succeed Len McCluskey In Bid To Unite Left
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One of Keir Starmer’s most vociferous critics has pulled out of the race to succeed Len McCluskey in a last-ditch bid to maintain the Left’s dominance over the Unite trade union.Howard Beckett, who has called for Starmer to be removed as Labour leader, has withdrawn his candidacy for general secretary and swung behind fellow assistant general secretary Steve Turner instead.The move is designed to maximise opposition to “moderate” candidate Gerard Coyne, who narrowly lost out to McCluskey in the race for the top job four years ago.Beckett had been under huge pressure to pull out amid fears that having three prominent leftwing candidates would split the vote in the first-past-the-post election, leaving Coyne with his best ever chance of taking over the UK’s second biggest union.In return for winning Beckett’s support, it appears that Turner will offer him a key post in the union should he win, possibly deputy general secretary.A similar offer looks likely to be made to another Left contender, Sharon Graham, who has refused to withdraw.In a joint statement, Beckett and Turner said they would have a “blended” manifesto which included ideas such as a new ‘Unite TV’ station to provide a progressive alternative to the news media.“Throughout this contest, we have both been committed to one thing above all – developing further the role our union has played since its foundation as a fighting back, progressive, campaigning force for working people throughout Britain and Ireland.“It is clear that developing that unique role requires the unity of the left in our union, and of all those representatives and members in the workplaces and beyond who have made Unite a union to be proud of.“They will both work to implement a blended manifesto, taking the best ideas from both candidates, when Steve Turner becomes general secretary.”Coyne reacted to the news by saying: “We now have a Communist Party candidate [Turner], a Socialist Worker Party candidate [Graham] and myself in the Unite election. I’m happy to be the mainstream candidate for the members.“I am the only candidate who would change the culture of the union, make its financial affairs transparent, improve its internal democracy and end the ill-judged attempts to drive the Labour Party from the back seat.“I was up against three full time officers of Unite who represented continuity and were opposed to change. Now their number is reduced to two. It makes no difference. It’s now clear that if you vote Turner, you get Beckett.”On Friday, Beckett continued his attacks on Starmer, pointing out that “any other leader would be twenty points ahead” of the Tories in the national polls, and pointing to Labour’s tiny number of votes in the Chesham and Amersham by-election.Earlier this week, he called unequivocally for demonstrations and protests outside Starmer’s office and Labour’s HQ to remove him as Labour leader.Starmer must go. pic.twitter.com/Pf2YrgrMca— Howard Beckett (@BeckettUnite) June 14, 2021However, Turner has previously told HuffPost UK: “Keir wasn’t my preferred candidate [he voted for Rebecca Long-Bailey]. But I’m a socialist, I’m a democrat, and the reality of it is he was elected by the vast majority of our members that voted.”He had also warned that a split Left vote would help ‘centrist’ candidate Coyne.“If everyone’s on the ballot paper, if there were a four way split, then that’s pretty much an open game. And who knows what the outcome of that would be.“I think the centre vote would hold up because that’s a core vote, if that candidate played their cards right and ran a good campaign and not a negative campaign, absolutely I can see them getting 60,000 votes. And if we had the same turnout as last time, there ain’t enough votes to go round on a straight three-way split to defeat that.”In their joint statement, Turner and Beckett said they would campaign together for the next two months to present a joint programme.That included “greater support for workplace representatives, important new communications initiatives including Unite TV, upgraded education and training for members, an independent and progressive political voice, and a new structure for the union reflecting the diversity of our nations and regions.”Turner said he warmly welcomed Beckett’s support and appreciates his decision to stand aside. “As general secretary two of the most important people in his team will be Howard Beckett and Sharon Graham and the structures of Unite would reflect this.”Coyne is adamant he can still win, and has denounced the “backroom deals” aimed at pushing a “continuity candidate” to succeed McCluskey.Despite recent cuts in donations, Unite is still Labour’s biggest financial backer and has huge influence on the party through its representatives on the ruling National Executive Committee (NEC).Beckett was recently suspended by Labour after he tweeted that home secretary Priti Patel should be deported for her treatment of migrants and asylum seekers.Related...Why The Unite Election Has Lessons In Unity For Keir Starmer - And The LeftUnite Urged to Stop Being Starmer's 'Backseat Driver' By Union Leadership ContenderUnite's Steve Turner Warns Split Left Vote Could See Len McCluskey Replaced By Centrist
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A series of three homophobic incidents in a single day inspired British artist Paul Harfleet to start The Pansy Project in 2005.Harfleet has since planted more than 300 pansies on patches of soil close to the sites of anti-LGBTQ+ attacks worldwide. He photographs each flower to memorialise the abuse and raise awareness about homophobia and transphobia. The images are collected on the project’s website.“When I began the project 16 years ago, I hoped the need for it would fade,” Harfleet told HuffPost this week. “Alas, cases continue and the LGBTQ+ experience is still a challenging one all over the world to varying degrees.”Harfleet chose to plant pansies because of their “obvious connection with homophobia,” he said. “Being called a ‘big pansy’ was common for me as a child, and it references being weak, gay or ‘like a girl.’”He planted the first in his then-home city of Manchester soon after being the victim of three homophobic incidents in quick succession.Construction workers shouting at Harfleet and this then-boyfriend, “It’s about time we went gay-bashing again isn’t it?” was soon followed by stones being thrown at the couple by a mob. The third incident involved “a bizarre and unsettling confrontation with a man who called us ‘ladies’ under his breath.”“People were shocked that this had happened to me. Alas, I was not,” Harfleet remembered. “I felt that this may be something that needed to be explored as an artwork.”Harfleet has now planted pansies across the UK, mainland Europe, the United States and in Canada, usually when visiting cities to talk about the project at art festivals and exhibitions.He relies on online callouts for suggestions of what incidents to mark.Sometimes he’ll receive hundreds of ideas. “Other times it’s just a few.” He then selects the specific locations for planting based on the media coverage that the attack received, its potential cultural impact and the context of where it happened.“I don’t feel it’s my job to mark every location of hate crime. That would be impossible,” Harfleet said. They are “all upsetting” but “the way some experiences haunt people draw me to them, and I feel a sense of duty to mark their experiences. It’s a very intuitive process and one that differs in every town and country I visit.”The photographing of each pansy can be a process in and of itself.“I lie on the ground to do this, so sometimes people think I’m drunk, or I’ve fallen over,” Harfleet said. “When I was in Kansas with the Spencer Museum of Art, I was lying on the side of the road photographing a pansy and several people reported a ‘dead body’ on the side of the road as I was so still taking the pictures. The police arrived to check I wasn’t dead.”“Of course the irony of this is not lost on me,” he continued. “Sometimes I’m planting pansies to mark a homophobically motivated murder. I can be lying exactly where they fell when they were attacked. This adds to the poignancy of the work.”With Covid-19 lockdown rules in the UK effectively forcing Harfleet to pause the project for parts of the last year, he turned to drawing the birds that he saw from his window. It was an effort to provide “an alternative to the growing horrors of the pandemic,” he told the Spencer Museum of Art.Now, as coronavirus restrictions are being eased, he is preparing to plant his pansies on patches of soil in Bristol as part of the upcoming “Vanguard” street art exhibition.Some will also be planted as part of a walking tour in October.“This is always a lovely thing to do, as people can come together to talk about their experiences. My job is to give a purpose and occasionally nudge the conversation as I plant,” he said. “It’s a slightly absurd yet beautiful thing to do (and see) as people follow me planting random pansies on the street. Though ultimately standing against homophobia and transphobia as a community can be an empowering and moving experience for me and the participants.”As for others who want to plant pansies on their own?They are more than “welcome to [and have] planted [pansies] to mark their own experiences of homophobia and transphobia,” said Harfleet.“This is part of the wonder of the idea. It’s democratic and open to everyone.”Check out The Pansy Project on its website, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.“Vanguard presents ‘Bristol Street Art: The Evolution of a Global Movement’” opens at the M Shed museum in Bristol on Jun. 26 until October.Useful websites and helplinesLondon Lesbian & Gay switchboard (LLGS) is a free confidential support & information helpline for LGBT communities throughout the UK | 0300 330 0630Manchester Lesbian and Gay Switchboard is a free support, information and referral service for the Manchester and North-West area | 0161 235 8000Stonewall for more information on other LGBT services and helplines | 08000 502020
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Whether you’ve got a passion for tech, a love of fitness or an interest in content creation, you don’t need to leave your home to give your creativity the space it needs to thrive. With the right tech, you can turn your house into the perfect environment to showcase your skills and pursue your passions.Podcaster and writer Clemmie Telford, Dr Zoe Williams and Tom ‘The Tech Chap’ Honeyands’ invited HuffPost UK into their homes to show how tech enables them to get creative in every room of the house, allowing them to indulge their passions and progress their careers.Turn every room in the house into an inspiring spaceFrom hosting Instagram Live fitness classes to intimate 1:1 consultations with her patients, Dr Zoe Williams is one busy lady. Thanks to her reliable broadband set-up, she is able to manage her varied roles from home, using different rooms in the house to fulfil different duties.Her passion for health runs through every facet of her career as a doctor, fitness influencer and media personality, and each room in the house doubles as a workspace, too. Her bedroom is where she streams Instagram Lives to her tens of thousands of followers, her kitchen has the necessary tech for video conferences, webinars and her podcast and she uses another room for consultations with patients.′Having reliable broadband has helped me develop my passion for fitness, with everything from Crossfit all the way through to doing online fitness classes,’ Williams says.While everything runs thanks to super reliable, Sky Broadband Superfast, Dr Zoe also uses other tools to help her stay creatively motivated, like a ring light setup, so she can work out with her followers. We’d also recommend taking a leaf out of Dr Zoe’s book, literally. Fill one room with plants to create a calm oasis. Dr Zoe uses this space for virtual sessions with patients, and it’s also her ‘home studio’, where she chats to millions as a media personality on TV’s This Morning.Whether you need to multitask in one room or across your whole house, the right tech setup and super reliable broadband will ensure that you can focus on creating.Watch Dr Zoe’s tour of her home set-up here and see how you can turn every room into your house into a multi-use space.Use tech to help you multi-taskWith three kids and a busy career as a podcaster, author and content creator, Clemmie Telford uses tech to her advantage at home. If she needs a hand with the kids, her ‘gallery of electronic devices’ in the kitchen can help, with mobiles, tablets and gaming consoles providing endless entertainment. Clemmie’s smart home smart speaker is especially handy; Clemmie jokes she uses it to ‘help me parent’.Having a tech set-up that works seamlessly thanks to super reliable, Sky Broadband Superfast helps Clemmie to be more efficient pursuing her creative passions.Tech isn’t only a tool that helps Clemmie stay organised and entertain the whole family; she uses her laptop for everything, from writing her book to getting her content online the moment creative inspiration strikes.‘The fact is, I am a mum who is also a content creator, and it really pays for me to have reliable broadband. If I spot a brilliant moment, I can shoot it and get it straight up,’ she tells the camera.You don’t need the fanciest equipment for studio quality sound or to create content that touches over a hundred thousand people every day. But you do need super reliable broadband, like Sky Broadband Superfast.Watch Clemmie Telford tour us round her home set-up, where she talks parenthood and content creation and how reliable broadband helps fuel her passions.There’s no such thing as too many tech toys Tom ‘The Tech Chap’ Honeyands has turned his passion for tech and playing games into a successful, award-winning career, with over 1 million YouTube subscribers tuning in for his reviews on the latest laptops and graphics cards. His home is set up to ensure all of his passions can be pursued whenever he wants, with a dedicated film studio, gaming centre and streaming zone, all running in tandem thanks to super reliable, Sky Broadband Superfast.‘This is where I can be most creative and with all these smart home devices, everything connected through the home broadband, it’s just amazing that I can work from here, in my own home, in my own studio,’ he says in the video.In addition to using broadband to pursue his creative passions, Tom relies on it for play too, with his array of smart gadgets, which include a smart fan, robot vacuum, voice-command lighting and smart coffee maker, which brews up his oat milk latte while he’s still in bed.When you have a super reliable broadband set-up, there’s no such thing as too many gadgets.You can watch Tom’s tech home tour here and check out how his amazing home broadband set-up. See how he’s made zones in different rooms that merge his love of tech with his career.Keen to see where your passions can take you? Super reliable, Sky Broadband Superfast has some fantastic prizes in store to help fuel your passions. They’re offering you the chance to win the ultimate fitness bundle, complete with an Apple Watch, £300 to spend on activewear, a 1-year FITT subscription please free Sky Q for a year. To enter, simply answer the multiple choice question and select your favourite prize...
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We’re pretty sure that when you look up ‘multitasker’ in the dictionary, you’re going to see a picture of content creator Clemmie Telford. Not only is Clemmie host of the But Why? podcast (and author of a forthcoming book with the same title), which aims to get to the bottom of all of life’s tricky-to-answer questions, she’s also the curator behind The Mother of All Lists blog. Throw three kids into the mix and it’s no wonder she describes her household as ‘absolute chaos.’ Clemmie took HuffPost UK on a tour of her home, which is also where she runs her business from.‘The fact is, I am a mum who is also a content creator, and it really pays for me to have reliable broadband. If I spot a brilliant moment, I can shoot it and get it straight up’ she tells the camera.The tour begins downstairs, where Clemmie shows off her ‘gallery of electronic devices,’ a corner of the kitchen where lots of the tech in her household resides, like tablets, kids’ gaming consoles and smart speakers.‘At certain points in the day, everybody is streaming something different, from a different place,’ Clemmie explains. It’s a familiar sight in many family households – but works seamlessly thanks to super reliable, Sky Broadband Superfast.In pride of place? A smart home assistant, which Telford jokes she uses ‘to help me parent,’ setting alarms to notify the kids of what they need to do when she’s upstairs working.Clemmie works upstairs, in her home office. The room is full of colour and inspiration, with books everywhere – no surprise it was the ideal space for Clemmie to write her own book, which examines how to have those tricky conversations with your kids (and be honest with yourself in the process).Clemmie’s bedroom is her calm zone, her creative space and another workspace, too. It’s where she records her podcast and hosts Instagram Lives.‘I record the podcast right here in our bedroom and it’s very real. I’m up here with my laptop on a pile of books, and getting studio quality sound at home. I’m really lucky that I get to do what I love and it enables me to provide for my family, and that wouldn’t be possible without reliable broadband,’ she says in the video.Watch the video above for the full tour of Clemmie’s home and her connected devices.Like Clemmie, reliable broadband can help bring your passions to life. See how super reliable, Sky Broadband Superfast can fuel your passions.Keen to see where your passions can take you? Super reliable, Sky Broadband Superfast has some fantastic prizes in store to help fuel your passions. They’re offering you the chance to win the ultimate fitness bundle, complete with an Apple Watch, £300 to spend on activewear, a 1-year FITT subscription please free Sky Q for a year. To enter, simply answer the multiple choice question and select your favourite prize...
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Former Test and Trace chief Dido Harding has applied to become the next head of the NHS.Current chief executive Sir Simon Stevens will stand down at the end of July, creating a vacancy for a post that often has more power than most Cabinet ministers.The Tory peer’s move emerged in a new updated biography of her on the NHS England website, which stated she had stepped aside from her position as chair of NHS Improvement pending her application.The ex-Talk Talk telecoms boss hit the headlines throughout the Covid pandemic when she was appointed by health secretary Matt Hancock, without competition, to run the much-criticised £37bn Test and Trace programme.Harding was appointed last summer and finally stepped down from the role this April, reverting to her NHS Improvement post only.Test and Trace was this year criticised by the Commons Public Accounts Committee, which said there was “no clear evidence” it contributed to a reduction in coronavirus infection levels.Although several NHS officials are expected to go for the top job, Harding’s Tory links plus her lack of experience running hospitals would make her appointment highly controversial.Harding’s updated biography on the NHS England website states: “Dido has applied to become the next CEO of the NHS and has therefore stood aside as chair of NHS Improvement whilst the recruitment process takes place. Sir Andrew Morris is standing in for her during this time.”According to the NHS England annual report for 2019/20, the chief executive salary was between £195,000 and £200,000.Until Thursday, Harding had only said she was “thinking about” applying for the NHS chief executive job.She was made a Tory peer by David Cameron, a fellow Oxford contemporary, and is married to Tory MP and former minister John Penrose.Shadow health minister Justin Madders told HuffPost UK: “I would hope that all candidates applications are judged on the basis of their recent performance in public sector roles, which in her case speaks for itself, failing which Dominic Cummings WhatsApp ought to provide a candid assessment”Related...Just 18% Of People With Covid Symptoms Use Test And TraceConsultants Deloitte Paid To Draft Ministers' Parliamentary Answers On Test And TraceTest And Trace Hiring A 'Lessons Learnt Analyst' On £45,000 Salary
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Boris Johnson’s so-called “culture war” is turning off voters in southern Tory seats, a senior Liberal Democrat said on the eve of a key by-election result.Munira Wilson told HuffPost UK that foreign aid cuts and some MPs’ support for those who boo England players taking the knee were going down “like a lead balloon” in the so-called “blue wall” of Tory seats.Her comments came as voters went to the polls in Chesham and Amersham on Thursday, which the Lib Dems are hoping to win from the Tories for the first time ever.Internal party polling suggested the Lib Dems had narrowed a gap that resulted in a 16,000 majority in 2019 and were neck-and-neck in the polls this week.Pollsters and experts believe the Lib Dems taking the seat would show the Tories are losing their well-off traditional voters as they focus on cementing gains in the largely Brexit-supporting “red wall” former Labour working class areas.Wilson said that even if the Lib Dems fail to win, there will be a big swing away from the Tories and towards her party among socially liberal voters with an internationalist outlook.She told HuffPost UK’s Commons People podcast: “The Tories are now so focused on the red wall and their culture wars that I think really appeal and resonate in those [red wall] seats, that many of those people who, yes, largely voted Remain in the referendum... are looking for an alternative.”The Lib Dem health spokesperson said that voters were also moving on from Brexit, with planning reforms that are opposed by dozens of southern Tory MPs a “huge concern” in areas like Chesham and Amersham.But she said culture war issues are also resonating with Tory voters who are switching to the Lib Dems.“Things like the cut in foreign aid, which I see as part of that culture war,” Wilson said.“Ministers will tell us, well actually it’s really popular and people want us spending that money in the left behind areas.“In these sorts of areas [like Chesham and Amersham] I don’t think it’s an ‘either/or’, it’s an ‘and’- we have a moral obligation to be spending the 0.7% on foreign aid and looking after the world’s poorest, but equally investing in our recovery up and down the country.”Wilson also hit out at Tory MPs like Lee Anderson, who said he would boycott England games at the Euros because players take the knee before matches in support of anti-racism.Home secretary Priti Patel has also accused the England football team of “gesture politics”, while refusing to criticise those who boo the players, saying it was a “choice for them”.This is proving counter-productive in better off, southern Tory-held seats, Wilson said.“I say this as a massive England football fan,” she said.“I think the recent debacle over footballers taking the knee, for most people it’s like, you know, England’s in the Euros, we’re hosting loads of the matches, we should be getting behind our team and not suddenly criticising them for taking the knee.“Lots of people in these seats recognise that there is still an issue with racism in many parts of our society and we should be doing everything we can to combat that.“And yes, taking the knee doesn’t necessarily resolve those issues but it is a symbol and reminding people that this is still an issue and we need to be working together to combat it.“Rather than some of the Tory MPs saying ‘we’re going to be boycotting these matches and we don’t support them’, I just really think that sort of thing goes down like a lead balloon in many of these areas.”Related...All Over-18s Can Book A Covid Vaccination From Friday, Hancock SaysCummings Wants Hancock’s Scalp, But Keir Starmer Is Right To Focus On The PMBoris Johnson Called Matt Hancock ‘Totally F**king Hopeless’ In WhatsApp Message
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As well as hosting portions of the recent Friends reunion, James Corden spent some time with the cast on set filming scenes for his US talk show.On Wednesday night, the results of this finally aired on The Late, Late Show, with James chatting to the stars about how it felt to be back on the set of Friends after almost 20 years.The 10-minute sequence – which included an abridged version of Carpool Karaoke – saw James quizzing the six central actors about what really went on behind the scenes while sitting in Central Perk.James began by asking which of the six “broke character and laughed the most whilst filming”, with the group unanimously choosing Lisa Kudrow.“I’m the worst,” she conceded. “I have no training and no discipline.”“But she’s also got the best laugh ever,” David Schwimmer insisted.She wasn’t the only one cracking up on set, though, with Matt LeBlanc responding: “I think that has to be a toss-up between Lisa and Jennifer [Aniston].”Responding to an incredulous Jen, Matt continued: “Whenever you watch Friends, if Rachel [covers her mouth] a lot, that’s Jennifer hiding her laugh.”After agreeing that David Schwimmer is the best dancer, and Matt LeBlanc “will always watch an old episode of Friends” if he comes across one on TV, Jen then came clean about being “the Friend who stole the most wardrobe from set”.“I still wear it!” she admitted. “I would go into Monica’s rack… and take all the dresses.”At the end of the game, a tearful James told the cast: “Thank you so much for letting me come and be a part of this incredibly moving thing for all of you. I’ll never ever forget being in this room and being with you, this has been absolutely brilliant.”The Friends reunion special debuted last month, following a number of setbacks due to the pandemic.During the special, the cast reminisced about some of their favourite memories from making Friends, and were joined by former co-stars like James Michael Tyler, Maggie Wheeler, Christina Pickles and Elliot Gould.There were also appearances from A-list Friends fans including Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, David Beckham, BTS and Malala Yousafzai.Friends: The Reunion is still available to stream on NOW.HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices and availability subject to change.READ MORE:The Friends Cast Belt Out The Show's Iconic Theme Tune With James Corden And Oh, The NostalgiaDon't Worry Folks, Matt LeBlanc Saw The Funny Side Of Your Friends Reunion MemesFriends Reunion Director Reveals How Set Blunder Nearly Ruined Show's Emotional Opening Moments
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The NHS app has been updated with a new ‘Covid Pass’, which can be used to show vaccination status and test results. The app already displayed how many vaccines a person has received and when, but the new function allows users to display any recent Covid-19 test results, too. It means those who have yet to be double vaccinated can take a lateral flow test at home and log it on the app before attending a venue. Spot tests will ensure people are being truthful about their negative results, the Daily Mail reports.The NHS App, where the NHS Covid Pass is available, is different to the NHS Covid-19 app used for contact tracing.The app’s new function has been primarily designed to aid large events, including Wimbledon and Euro 2020 matches, which are part of the government’s events research programme. At Wimbledon, for example, anyone attending as a fan will need to either show proof of full vaccination, a negative lateral flow test or immunity through a recent Covid infection (a positive PCR test in the previous 180 days).Outside of these official pilot events, the government has said that displaying vaccination status won’t be made mandatory, but event organisers will be given the option to ask attendees to show their Covid status. HuffPost UK has contacted the government for further clarity on which business may be encouraged to use the app’s function in the coming months and will update this article when we receive a response. There has already been widespread criticism surrounding the concept of domestic “Covid passports”. Wetherspoon boss Tim Martin previously said vaccine passports would be “the last straw” for struggling pubs. Meanwhile, a cross-party group of MPs working with the Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee (PACAC) urged the government not to introduce Covid passports for domestic use. They argued that passports would “disproportionately discriminate” based on race, religion, age and socio-economic background. Internationally, though, health ministers from G7 countries agreed on the need to work together to develop “mutual recognition of testing and vaccination certificates across countries”. Vaccine passports appear likely around international travel. Despite the new app update, a government spokesperson told PA a review of the evidence around Covid certification was still ongoing.READ MORE:Delta Variant Symptoms Might Be Different To What We're Used ToWill Lockdown Be Extended Again?You're Finally Vaccinated, But Don't Forget These 5 PrecautionsThe 'Game-Changing' Antibody Tests That Could Detect Covid Variants
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It’s been a big surprise to me as a generally quiet (and totally introverted) human being that my six-year-old is naturally outgoing. He was the kid bounding into preschool on the second day without looking back as his classmates clung to their parents. He makes a new friend just about every time we go to the playground. This spring, he joined a baseball team where he was basically the only kid who didn’t know anyone else, and after maybe four minutes of initial clinginess, he butted into the other kids’ dynamic, utterly oblivious to the fact that he was the odd man out.In general, he is rewarded for this behaviour. His teachers call him a leader. People (myself included) marvel at how sociable he tends to be.His younger brother, on the other hand, appears at this point to be much more like me when I was a kid: quiet in new situations and much more likely to hang back. (I say “appears” because he’s only 3, and I have no idea who he is yet. He told me today that his favourite colour was “broccoli cow” so it’s safe to say he’s still figuring out himself and the world.)But I notice already that people seem to want my quieter little kid to change — to come out of his shell, and to jump into new situations with the kind of gregariousness that comes easily to his brother. I both hate that for him and want to do my due diligence as a parent by preparing him to exist in a world that tends to reward extroversion. So what are parents of shy kiddos to do? How can we support them and help them grow without forcing them to change?1. Stop seeing shyness as a weaknessFirst, know that if your child comes off as shy in new situations, they’re in very good company.“Most children show reticence when meeting new people. That’s perfectly normal — and that initial shyness is just how we enter new space and get our bearings,” Koraly Pérez-Edgar, associate director of the Social Science Research Institute with the Child Study Center at Penn State University, told HuffPost.Picture, say, a kindergarten classroom on the first day. There might be one or two exuberant kids who are running around and checking everything out, but the rest stick close to their caregivers, or need some coaxing before they even head into the room, Pérez-Edgar said. It is completely developmentally appropriate for young children to feel shy in new settings.That doesn’t mean that shyness is atypical or bad in older kids either, even though many parents (and other adults) do still have a tendency to see outgoingness as the ideal. Just look to the work of Susan Cain, author of “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking,” who has spent years arguing that we have an unfair cultural bias to extroverts who thrive on stimulation. “I’ve never had a parent come to me and say they’re worried about their daughter because they have so many friends, and they’re always getting invaded by play dates, and they’re always at the centre of the playground. Because parents kind of see that as an ideal,” Pérez-Edgar said. “But you can be a shy child with one or two really good friends, who you talk to, who are supportive. That is great. That is not something to worry about. That’s just your child’s personality.”In fact, shyness can be a benefit. Adaptive shyness can help people think before they act, which means it is protective, and may even make people seem more calming and trustworthy. Experts who have studied shyness urge people not to think of it as a better or worse way of being social, just a different way of being social. 2. Avoid labelling your kiddo, and ask others to stop tooNow that I have a cute, cautious toddler, my days are filled with interactions in which an adult will say hello or coo at him, he’ll scurry behind my legs, and the adult will say, “Aw, he’s shy!” If they don’t, I’ll say it myself to reassure them that my kid’s not being rude.But I shouldn’t and they shouldn’t. In fact, I remember hating those moments in my own childhood. It’s weird when someone calls out what they perceive to be your own personality right in front of you. It feels limiting; it can be self-reinforcing, too. “Don’t label your child as shy,” urges paediatric nurse practitioner Kasey Rangan in a blog post for Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. “Try explaining to others that your child is slow to warm up to others but do your best to not label the behaviour.”Simply pointing out that your child is complex could be enough of a nudge to remind the adult not to label your child, even if they didn’t mean any harm.3. Give your child controlled opportunities to practice socialisingThe controlled part really is the key here. It’s important that parents not push shy children into overwhelming social situations, or new situations where they feel really uncomfortable. But it’s also important to give children plenty of opportunities to practice what it feels like to try new things and meet new people. “There have been a number of studies that show that when inhibited, shy children go to preschool a few days a week, or they’re in a club or on a team, that can be enough to get them over the hump and learn skills,” Pérez-Edgar said. “It’s just a matter of practice, and it can and should be structured.”You’re looking for that hard-to-find sweet spot between pushing your shy child a bit, without forcing them into situations that just aren’t a good match for their personality. Pérez-Edgar recalled how she used to take her shy child to gymnastics, but sat with her in the gym area (rather than the parent viewing booth) the first class. By the second class, she was able to back away a bit.Also, know that your child might always take a bit of time to warm up. What you want to see is that they get there eventually, and that they start to play and explore — even if it takes, say, 20 minutes of them feeling reticent at first.4. Ask them open-ended questions about how they feelWhile you don’t want to label your child as shy, it is important to give them opportunities to talk about what they’re feeling as they head out into the world and explore new situations. You can keep it really simple and open. Something like, “What were you thinking today? Did you like being at the swim class?” Pérez-Edgar suggested. That will help you get a sense of whether their shyness is bothering them in any way, or whether they’re uncomfortable, without you labelling anything or putting your own narrative or concerns on them.“It’s about letting your child tell you where their limits are, and respecting that,” said Pérez-Edgar. That becomes particularly important as your shy child grows up, and you want to continue to support their personality while still empowering them to talk to you if they’re grappling with anxiety or having a hard time figuring out where they fit in. 5. Know when to get helpIf you notice that your child’s shyness seems extreme (they’re tantrum-ing at every school drop-off, or they’re having a really difficult time making friends), or it doesn’t seem to be improving at all even with opportunities for controlled exposure — particularly as they move through elementary school — it’s worth checking in with their paediatrician or a mental health professional. “The child who you should worry about is the child who never warms up, who never happily enters these situations, who just can’t find their niche,” Pérez-Edgar said.The good news is that early interventions can be really effective at treating or even preventing full-blown social anxiety, and they don’t have to be “super intense” to work, said Pérez-Edgar.Then remember, acceptance really is key. There is absolutely nothing wrong with being reserved, and parents should make it clear to their children that they like their personalities just as they are.“It’s not a problem,” Pérez-Edgar said. “That’s just who your child is.”Related...There's A 'Gay Tax' On NHS Fertility Treatment. This Is The Impact5 Everyday Ways To Teach Your Kid To Be A Proud LGBTQ AllyWhat To Know About The Long Covid Clinics Opening For Kids
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Perspex screens that have sprung up in some offices and restaurants do not prevent the spread of Covid and could actually increase transmissibility, officials have told ministers.Ministers have been told the screens should be scrapped, according to a Whitehall document setting out recommendations to ministers on how England can eventually “live with Covid”.The draft document says the transparent plastic screens are often incorrectly positioned and could make matters worse by blocking airflow that helps disperse any virus droplets.It also recommends a boost in financial support for self isolation and suggests the government needs to decide whether to encourage people back to the office after the July 19 final easing of restrictions, remain neutral, or to continue to recommend home working where possible.HuffPost UK understands that there are no current plans to introduce any of the proposals, while Downing Street said the document “doesn’t reflect the latest government thinking”.But the prime minister’s official spokesperson said: “The Health and Safety Executive [HSE] will keep its guidance under review based on the latest evidence, and should that evidence necessitate a change, it would be changed.”A senior Tory suggested ministers should urgently address the issue of plastic screens, after the document obtained by Politico London Playbook suggested that they can actually increase the risk of Covid transmission by blocking airflow.Ministers have been given clear guidance that the screens, which are in place in the House of Commons chamber and a vast array of businesses from offices to restaurants, should be scrapped, Playbook reported.Senior Tory Sir Geoffrey Clifton-Brown suggested ministers should urgently update guidance to urge businesses to scrap the screens.“I think it’s an interesting finding and I suspect before too long those screens everywhere will disappear,” the treasurer of the backbench Tory 1922 committee told HuffPost UK.Asked whether the government should make an announcement on the findings quickly, he said: “Yes I think it should.”According to Playbook, the draft document also criticised the government for failing to sufficiently support people to self isolate if they have Covid.The existing isolation policy only has a “low to medium” effect because people on low incomes and in precarious jobs are not supported to isolate, meaning there are “barriers” and “disincentives” to staying at home.It recommends that ministers improve support to help stop the spread of Covid, Playbook said.Clifton-Brown supported the recommendation, suggesting people with a positive test should be given support of up to “hundreds” of pounds, while also facing random spot checks to ensure they are self isolating.“I think it’s a mixture of incentives and enforcement,” the Cotswolds MP said.“People have got to know that there’s a real chance that somebody is going to knock on their door at a random time to make sure they are there.“But in return they will get a payment of a few hundred pounds.”The document also reportedly said the government needs to decide whether to urge people to go back to work when restrictions are lifted on July 19, whether to remain neutral on the issue, or to encourage people to work from home.It also suggests drawing up minimum standards of ventilation for offices and that face masks may still be required.A UK government spokesperson said:“We have paused at step three [of the road map out of lockdown] for up to four weeks due to the new Delta variant, and we will continue to assess the latest data on this variant over the coming weeks.”Related...Boris Johnson Called Matt Hancock ‘Totally F**king Hopeless’ In WhatsApp MessageBoris Johnson Plans To Quit As PM To ‘Make Money And Have Fun’ By 2026, Cummings ClaimsHow Many Deaths Is Boris Johnson Willing To Tolerate To Keep His New Freedom Day Pledge?
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Boris Johnson called Matt Hancock “totally fucking hopeless” in a WhatsApp message to Dominic Cummings, the former No.10 adviser has claimed.Cummings published what he claimed was a WhatsApp conversation with the prime minister on March 27 2020, just after the UK was ordered into its first coronavirus lockdown.In an initial message, Cummings explained to Johnson that the United States had ramped up Covid testing rapidly while the UK was lagging behind.86/ Evidence on the covid disaster: as the PM said himself, Hancock's performance on testing, procurement, PPE, care homes etc was 'totally fucking hopeless', & his account to MPs was fiction: https://t.co/lur4Ddrddypic.twitter.com/JVGLCSov7v— Dominic Cummings (@Dominic2306) June 16, 2021“US has gone from 2,200 tests a fortnight ago to 27,000 a week ago to 100,000 yesterday,” Cummings wrote at 12.09am.“This is what we said we should do.“Instead we are still stuck on about 5,000-7,000 and Hancock [is] saying today he’s ‘sceptical’ about getting to 10,000 by Monday which he said would ‘definitely’ happen on Tuesday.“This means tens of thousands of NHS staff aren’t at work over the next critical three weeks - apart from my earlier point re: testing being integral to escape plan...”Johnson replied six minutes later: “Totally fucking hopeless”.The screenshot posted by Cummings then showed three missed calls from Johnson at 12.29am, which the aide explained was “the PM calling me to say he’d tested positive [for Covid”.“I couldn’t find my phone buzzing, we spoke minutes later,” he said in a blog.Downing Street and the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) have been approached for comment.This is a breaking news story and will be updated. Follow HuffPost UK on Twitter here, and on Facebook here.
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Insomnia will have you trying anything in the quest for a good night’s sleep. For journalist and author Kate Mikhail, no amount of eye masks, ear plugs, baths, sleep supplements or lavender oil could help her get a decent eight hours. “I had trouble getting to sleep on and off for decades” she tells HuffPost UK. “I had to have prescription sleeping pills as back-up for those nights when I was still wide awake and increasingly anxious around 3am, knowing I had to get up not that much later.”Mikhail would stress about not being able to sleep, which would turn into a vicious cycle the following day when it was time to hit the hay. “The worry and stress about not being able to sleep triggers our inbuilt fight or flight reaction,” she explains, “and we can’t relax into sleep when this is ramped up, due to the stay-awake hormones being released.”It was a chance reading of a book by her great-great uncle, an expert in cognitive therapy and clinical hypnosis, that led Mikhail to research the science of sleep and the mind-body loop. From there, she developed her own tried-and-tested methods that have finally enabled her to take control and wake up feeling rested. Her new book, Teach Yourself To Sleep, blends her experiences with sleep science and interviews with leading doctors, scientists and academics.Mikhail now describes herself as an ex-insomniac, so something clearly clicked during her quest to find answers to her sleep problem. Here, she shares some of the game-changers that helped her reassess her relationship with sleep. 1. Realising sleep isn’t a separate entity to the dayBefore writing her book, Mikhail saw sleep as something that happened at the end of the day, rather than being a product of that day. “I didn’t have any awareness of the sleep-wake cycle – what to do to set it up, or the need to help a whirring mind and body unwind from the overstimulation of modern life.”One mistake she made, she now realises, was that she didn’t look at what kept her awake. Nor did she appreciate that she couldn’t simply live her day right up until lights out, then expect to instantly switch off. It was only when she realised how sleep is shaped by everything that happens in the day that something clicked into place and made her look at sleep in a completely different way. Now, she’ll make what she calls “sleep-friendly decisions” from the moment she wakes up, such as what and when she eats, or what she can do to create and release melatonin – the hormone we need to sleep. Not looking at your phone before bed, getting out in the sun first thing in the morning and sleeping in a dark room can all help with melatonin production.Other sleep-friendly decisions she’s since made include: sticking to a fairly consistent sleep-wake routine, seven days a week, and steering clear of high-calorie, fast release foods too close to bedtime.“This stops your body from being over-stimulated just before bed,” she says. “Likewise avoiding nail-biter programmes last thing will help you settle much more quickly into the rest-and-digest state you need to be in to sleep.”2. Ditching the ‘insomniac’ labelMikhail says describing herself as an insomniac – and accepting that was her lot – probably didn’t help the situation. “Sleep is never set in stone and the words we use to describe ourselves affect how we feel, our emotions, expectations, physiology, habits and how we behave,” she says.So she stopped calling herself an insomniac – and it genuinely helped. “When we label ourselves as insomniacs, we’re setting up our expectations of what is going to happen each night when we go to bed,” she explains. “I started telling myself: ‘I may have slept badly in the past, but tonight my sleep will be better because of the changes I’ve made and the sleep tactics I’ve adopted’.”This attitude helped take away the insomnia worry and self-fulfilling prophecy aspect that would set in before she went anywhere near her bedroom.3. Appreciating the benefits of daylightDaylight has a huge impact on our sleep-wake cycle, and therefore our wellbeing. “If we don’t soak up enough daylight, our body clocks are left in a state of confusion and chaos,” says Mikhail. Understanding the basic biology behind this helped Mikhail understand why she wasn’t sleeping well. Light-sensitive cells in our eyes register the light around us and use this to sync our body clocks and set up our circadian rhythms. This makes us alert or tired depending on the time of day, she says.“I now make a point of getting out in the morning – or cheating with a light box when that’s not possible – to anchor my body clock in that light. I sky grab as the day goes on – looking up rather than down – so that those light-sensitive cells get this powerful sleep habit cue and my sleep cycle is kept on track.”4. Reading sleep scriptsSleep scripts are designed to help you unwind before bed. They’re something Mikhail swears by. “When first sorting out my sleep, I recorded myself reading a short sleep script written by my great-great uncle Richard Waters, which is in my book,” she says. She nows sets a daily reminder to listen to this at 5pm.A ‘sleep script’ (see an example here) sets the stage for the sleep you will have later, she explains. It helps change your thought habits in relation to sleep, but also how you feel, triggering physical and behavioural changes. It essentially runs through what should be happening in your body and mind as you prepare for bed. “It’s powerful given that our thoughts and the auto-suggestions we give ourselves set off a physical and behavioural chain reaction,” says Mikhail. There are four sleep scripts in Mikhail’s book, one of which was written by her relative. “I found it very relaxing and reassuring to listen to my uncle’s sleep script every evening, when I was sorting out my sleep,” she says. 5. Getting to grips with habitsThe ex-insomniac says researching habit science helped her tackle her problem head on. “It was fascinating to find that all habits are formed the same way, as far as our brain’s concerned, including our sleep habits,” she says. “I was able to stop my old sleep habit of ruminating in bed for hours on end.”There’s a whole chapter on habits in her book, exploring how they are formed in the brain and how we can look at our sleep habits in an objective way to dismantle the ones we don’t want and set up ones we do.“Our habits are fascinating – up to 40% of what we do every day is habitual,” she says. “Our sleep habit context is our bedroom and it’s important we make this as conducive to sleep as possible. This means lots of good sleep habit cues, as well as removing bad ones, such as work, or anything thats going to stimulate our mind and wake us up at a time when we need to mentally unwind and disengage.”Related...Bogged Down With Allergies? 10 Tips To Help You Sleep Better4 Signs You Have Intimacy Anxiety And How To Push Past It7 Ways To Undo The Brain Fog You're Feeling Because Of The PandemicHow To Get Out Of Bed If You Really, Really Don't Want To12 Mistakes Brits Always Make During A HeatwaveYep, Ignoring Your Natural Body Clock Is Pretty Bad For You
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When June 21 was announced as the potential date for the grand unlocking, clubbing was all anyone could talk about. The government even released a Clip Art-esque graphic, showing two dancers living their best life under a disco ball.But when Boris Johnson announced that the final stage of lockdown would be extended until July 19 during Monday evening’s press conference, not a whisper was made about the nightlife industry. It was “just another kick in the teeth” for the likes of Jeremy Joseph, the owner of G-A-Y, and others in the industry who have been preparing to reopen. “When people talk about hospitality, they talk about bars, they talk about restaurants, but everybody is ignoring nightclubs and actually, it’s the nightclubs that have the biggest costs and the biggest rents,” he tells HuffPost UK. “We’re just completely ignored.”London’s Heaven nightclub, G-A-Y’s largest venue, has been closed as a club since March 14 2020. Although the venue has hosted some smaller, seated events, they’ve had to stick to a capacity of 255. The venue usually hosts up to 1,625 people. “The bills and the majority of costs that you have are the same whether you’re at full capacity or lower capacity, so all we’re doing at the moment is reducing our losses, we’re not making money,” explains Joseph.G-A-Y’s bars, which have been able to reopen under the guidance, have subsidised Heaven to allow the nightclub to stay open, but it’s still been a struggle, he says. “We’re working day by day to survive, every bill we get in, we pay as we go along. We’re trying to keep our heads above water.”Nightclubs across the country have been crippled by the pandemic. A recent report by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for the Night Time Economy found that over three-quarters (78%) of all employees in the sector had at some point been on furlough. More than half (51%) of nightclubs have been forced to make staff redundant since last year, compared to 32% of bars and 26% of pubs, where restrictions have been less severe. Beyond providing 1.3 million jobs, the night time economy is home to a considerable body of freelance workers, particularly in clubs, where promoters, DJs and bouncers are usually self-employed. However, the report found that only 36% of self-employed nightlife workers have been able to claim the Self Employment Income Support Scheme.It concluded that “without urgent government support, nightlife businesses face extinction.” Joseph doesn’t want to reopen Heaven until it’s safe to do so, but says better financial support for the nightlife industry is urgently needed to keep venues from folding. He’s not convinced clubs will be allowed to go back to 100% capacity after July 19 and says Boris Johnson should create a roadmap for their reopening with incremental stages, rather than promise a date he can’t commit to. “It’s just completely insane. He has absolutely no idea what he’s doing. He doesn’t talk to the industries involved,” says Joseph of the prime minister. “He certainly hasn’t talked to us, and we’ve given him the opportunity many times.”Bill Brewster, who was one of the founding residents at London’s Fabric and has spent more than 30 years working as a promoter and DJ, is also worried about the longterm impact on the industry. He personally lost “thousands of pounds at a stroke” after Monday’s announcement.  They have shown time and again, this government doesn’t give a shit about our industry.Bill Brewster, promoter and DJ“Even a delay of a fortnight would’ve been costly, but this is so much worse,” he tells HuffPost UK. “They have shown time and again, this government doesn’t give a shit about our industry.”Other industries – such as the wedding sector, which launched an awareness campaign, #WhatAboutWeddings – have pointed out disparities in the pandemic guidance. Brewster argues the same can be seen for the nightlife industry. “What really was the point of doing test events which proved transmissibility was relatively low, when we end up in this position?” he asks. “We’re being punished because Boris Johnson was so desperate to make a trade deal with India, that he didn’t close down the borders fast enough.“By all means, change the dates and obey the data, but do not throw a whole industry to the wolves. Where’s the support? Full crowds allowed at Wimbledon where, of course, there are plenty of Tory voters and donors, but nothing for us?”Even for those who have found interim work, the restrictions faced by bars and clubs make for a very different livelihood. Osayuki Omo-Uwamere, who DJs under the name Yuki Love, performs at club nights, as well as celebrity and corporate launch parties. Some of these have continued throughout lockdown, but the atmosphere has changed. “My job is basically to get people to dance and create that atmosphere so it’s a weird one when bouncers are constantly reminding people whilst I’m DJing that they are unable to dance and that if they do they will get kicked out,” she says. “It’s mad.” A lot of the venues and clubs that I DJed in before the pandemic will probably never open their doors again and that’s the sad part.Yuki LoveIf club closures continue, she believes people will find alternative outdoor spaces, venues and pop-ups to enjoy live music and DJing.“We’re seeing that a lot now and I’m DJing at these type of events,” she says. “It’s the club and venue owners who are going to be the most affected by all of this. A lot of the venues and clubs that I DJed in before the pandemic will probably never open their doors again and that’s the sad part.”The lockdown delay also comes as a blow to avid clubbers like Ellie Campbell, 27, and based in Dalston, London. She moved to the capital specifically for the nightlife and thinks the latest extension “really oversteps the line”.“Considering the June date has been set in stone for such a long time, it’s adding insult to injury for those who have waited patiently to get back to normality and expand their networks again. Until clubbing and live music returns, social lives for those in their 20s are still seriously curbed by the restrictions,” says Campbell.“I do have concerns about how nightlife will ever recover without adequate government support for the industry, which doesn’t seem to be a priority. Myself and my peers have made sacrifices about our living and work spaces to enjoy the vibrant nightlife of the big city, so 18 months on and to still be in this situation just makes me feel we’re in suspended animation and are very much being treated as an afterthought. ” HuffPost UK put the concerns raised by our interviewees to the government, asking specifically about the lack of financial support businesses say they’ve received. A Treasury spokesperson said that local authorities have nearly £1bn of discretionary grant funding remaining, which they’re encouraged to use to support nightclubs and other hard-hit businesses.“Nightclubs have received Restart Grants worth up to £18,000 per venue to support them over the past few months,” they added. “Nightclubs will also benefit from business rates relief worth 75% across the whole year for most businesses, a VAT cut, and the furlough scheme.  “We are committed to helping businesses and individuals through the pandemic and deliberately went long with our support to provide certainty over the coming months.”But the question remains, if the industry does survive, will it have any workers left? The APPG report found that 85% of people working in the nightlife sector are considering leaving it.Joseph says the mental health impact on workers has been catastrophic. He personally lives alone and hasn’t been able to enjoy other lockdown restrictions easing because he can’t afford to test positive and have to self-isolate at the moment. Lockdown continues for him, without contact with friends and family. “He [Boris Johnson] makes me feel worthless. He makes what I do feel like it’s worth nothing,” he says. “At the moment I’m working seven days a week to just survive and I’m done. I was done months ago. My love for this job has completely gone and I will never get it back. I just want to escape now. I don’t want to be here any more. And [Johnson] has done that by the way he’s treated people and the way he’s treated this industry.” Useful websites and helplinesMind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected] Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0808 801 0525 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.READ MORE:Coronavirus Is Threatening LGBTQ Businesses. Here's Why It's Vital We Protect ThemHere's What Those Mass Event Trials Found About Covid RiskThe Wedding Rules You Need To Know From June 21June 21 Is Delayed And If You're Gutted, That's UnderstandableThe Riskiest (And Safest) Activities As Unlocking Approaches
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For months, parents have been campaigning for long Covid to be recognised in children – and slowly but surely, things are changing. Fifteen specialist long Covid clinics for children and young people are going to be opened across England, the NHS has revealed, as part of a £100 million expansion of care for those suffering from the condition. The paediatric hubs will draw together experts on common symptoms such as respiratory problems and fatigue who can directly treat children, advise family doctors or others caring for them, or refer them into other specialist services.How common is long Covid in children?More than one million people have reported suffering from long Covid, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).While the majority of children and young people are not severely affected by Covid, ONS data has shown that 7.4% of children aged 2-11 and 8.2% of those aged 12-16 report continued symptoms. Earlier this year, parents told HuffPost UK how they felt helpless at how much their children’s lives had been disrupted by common long-term symptoms such as fatigue, body aches and headaches.One father told us his son was “like a six-year-old in a 90-year-old’s body”. Chris Ward said his little boy Thomas first fell ill in February 2020 with a fever, breathlessness and aches all over his body. When he spoke to us in January 2021, his son was still suffering. Every few weeks, his temperature would soar, his glands would be constantly enlarged and his body ached most days. In a bid to raise awareness of the impact the virus can have on children, parents joined forces to form the action group Long Covid Kids.An informal survey of parents in the group found children affected were most commonly experiencing fatigue, sore throat, gastrointestinal issues, headaches, muscle pain, and weakness months after first becoming sick.What is the purpose of the new hubs?The new hubs for kids will bring together paediatricians, physiotherapists, nurses and occupational therapists, who will offer specialist advice to family doctors, community nurses and other staff seeing Covid patients aged up to 18, so they can get the help they need closer to home.They will also see and treat complicated cases directly or refer them into other specialist services.Where will the hubs be based?The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (NuTH)South Tees NHS Foundation Trust (James Cook University Hospital)Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust  Leeds Children’s Hospital NHS Foundation TrustHull University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation TrustAlder Hey Children’s HospitalManchester Children’s hospitalBirmingham and Solihull Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHSFTLeicester, Leicestershire and Rutland University Hospital Leicester NHSTCambridge University HospitalsBristol Children’s hospitalOxford University HospitalsQueen Alexandra Hospital, PortsmouthUniversity Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation TrustLondon hub led by the Evelina, Imperial, UCLH and GOSHThere is already a network of specialist long Covid clinics that have been given £34 million of funding, however some people have faced difficulties accessing them due to where they live.While the launch of the hubs for young people will be welcome news to some – and an acknowledgement of how this condition affects kids – there’s a question as to whether just 15 hubs across the country will be enough to help the thousands of children suffering.HuffPost UK has contacted the Long Covid Kids action group to hear their thoughts and will update this piece when we receive a response. Related...‘A 6-Year-Old In A 90-Year-Old’s Body’ – The Children Devastated By Long Covid‘A 6-Year-Old In A 90-Year-Old’s Body’ – The Children Devastated By Long CovidWhat The Lockdown Extension Means For YouThe Riskiest (And Safest) Activities As Unlocking ApproachesHas Being So Careful During The Pandemic Altered Our Immune Systems?
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After a long wait, gay and bisexual men are able to donate blood more freely, following an overhaul of “dehumanising” blood donation rules. Under the old rules, gay and bi men were unable to donate blood unless they’d abstained from sexual activity for more than three months. They were also specifically asked about their sexuality on donation forms.The reasoning given was that “at a population level, men who have sex with men are at an increased risk of acquiring certain infections through sex”.But under the new rules in England, Scotland and Wales, eligibility to give blood will be based on individual circumstances surrounding health, travel and sexual behaviours instead.What does the rule change mean? Any individual who attends to give blood – regardless of gender – will be asked if they’ve had sex and, if so, about recent sexual behaviours. Those who’ve had the same sexual partner for the last three months will be eligible to donate – regardless of gender or sexuality.People will also be able to donate if they have a new sexual partner with whom they’ve not had anal sex and there is no known recent exposure to an STI or recent use of PrEP or PEP. To mitigate risks, those who’ve had anal sex with a new partner or with multiple partners in the last three months will not be able to give blood, but may be eligible in the future.Donors who have been recently treated for gonorrhoea will be deferred and anyone who’s ever received treatment for syphilis will not be able to give blood.Wasn’t this rule change announced last year?Yes, but it’s only just coming into play from June 14. The changes follow an evidence-based review by the FAIR (For the Assessment of Individualised Risk) steering group led by NHS Blood and Transplant.The new donor selection system is designed to be fairer and will also maintain the UK’s status as one of the safest blood supplies in the world. Data around the impact of the donor selection changes will be kept under review and assessed 12 months after implementation to determine if changes are needed. How do people feel about it?Commenting on the rule changes when they were first announced in December, Adam Bloodworth wrote for HuffPost UK: “What people may not realise is that dehumanising rules like these reinforce feelings of shame that many LGBTQ people carry around with them as a heavy mental burden each day.“By being discounted from an activity most people are encouraged to do, we’re reminded that we are perceived to be ‘different’ by some in society – no matter how many times people tell us we aren’t.”Ethan Spibey was prevented from donating blood due to his sexuality – he’d wanted to do his bit and donate after a blood donor saved his grandfather’s life, but was unable to do so. Spibey, who has since been campaigning for a change to donation rules and founded FreedomToDonate, said: “The work of the FAIR steering group shows that simply being a man who has sex with men is not a good enough reason to exclude someone from donating blood.“This is more than just about a fairer and more inclusive system, it’s about those who rely on blood, and giving blood literally saves lives. I can’t wait to finally repay that first pint. I would encourage anyone who is able to safely donate blood to register to do so.”How to donate bloodGay and bi men who’ve previously been turned away for blood donation can call NHS Blood and Transplant on 0300 123 23 23, which can review the new guidelines with you and, if eligible, book your next appointment.Robbie de Santos, from the charity Stonewall, welcomed the “historic change”.“We want to see a blood donation system that allows the greatest number of people to donate safely and we will continue to work with government to build on this progress and ensure that more people, including LGBT+ people, can donate blood safely in the future,” he said. Related...Being Banned From Donating My Blood Was Dehumanising. I’m Glad The Law Is ChangingPfizer Vaccine Results In Lower Antibodies Targeting Delta VariantIf You're Not Angry About Period Poverty, You're Not ListeningWhat It's Like To Receive Blood Plasma To Treat Covid-19
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After weeks of ‘will they won’t they’ debate about whether Boris Johnson will delay the June 21 final lifting of Covid restrictions, we are finally about to find out what happens next.The prime minister will deliver a press conference on Monday evening at which he will set out his plan for step four of the road map out of lockdown.A delay is widely expected, amid a spike in Covid cases driven by the Delta variant first detected in India.But there remain questions over how long it will be, whether rules for weddings or other activities could be relaxed, and what a delay means for the government’s pandemic strategy.Here’s what we know so far:What is happening with England’s lockdown?The prime minister will meet senior ministers and officials on Sunday evening to make a final decision about whether to proceed with the June 21 unlocking.He is then expected to deliver his verdict to the nation during a Monday evening press conference from Downing Street, after racing back from the Nato summit in Brussels.Will lockdown easing be delayed?Johnson looks almost certain to delay the widespread easing of restrictions, admitting over the weekend there are “grounds for caution”.Reports suggest that he is mulling over a two or four-week delay.But the smart money looks on the latter with England’s chief medical officer Chris Whitty reportedly favouring a longer delay.Scientists advising the government have also now predicted that the PM will announce a delay on Monday.Why will the June 21 unlocking be delayed?The latest figures from Public Health England (PHE) on Friday showed there have been 42,323 cases of the Delta variant confirmed in the UK, up by 29,892 from the previous week.It estimates the strain is 60% more transmissible compared with the previously dominant Alpha, or Kent, variant, and that cases are doubling every four-and-a-half days in some parts of England.The Delta variant also now accounts for 96% of new infections.Johnson said on Saturday that cases and hospitalisations are now going up and that he has “serious concern” about this potentially feeding through to more deaths.Foreign secretary Dominic Raab said on Sunday that ministers would be looking at whether vaccinations have “broken the link” between rising cases and rising hospitalisations, “not just severed or weakened it”.Professor Andrew Hayward, a member of the Nervtag group which advises ministers on new respiratory diseases, said it was clear the country was facing a “substantial” third wave of the disease.He said the key issue was the extent to which that led to more people becoming seriously ill and requiring hospital treatment.“We still don’t know how bad it could be,” he told BBC’s The Andrew Marr Show.But what about Covid vaccines?More than three quarters (78.9%) of adults have now had their first dose of the vaccine.But the latest PHE estimates suggest that one dose of Pfizer or AstraZeneca is only around 33% effective against the Delta variant, compared with around 50% against the previously dominant Alpha variant.Encouragingly though, once people have two jabs the vaccines’ effectiveness is only slightly reduced – from around 88% to 80%.The problem is only 56% of adults have had both jabs, so a delay would give the NHS more time to give more people their second dose, and so reduce the risk of rising hospitalisations that could put the NHS under pressure.Johnson said on Saturday that “we need to make sure we give the vaccines extra legs.”On the plus side, deaths are still very low, although there is always a lag between rising cases feeding through to more deaths.Could a lockdown delay last longer than four weeks?At a Sunday press conference to close the G7 summit in Cornwall, Johnson refused to say whether the June 21 schedule could be pushed back longer than four weeks.Foreign secretary Dominic Raab meanwhile said that unlocking needed to be “irreversible” and so the government needed to proceed “carefully and cautiously”.“We don’t want to yo-yo back in and out of measures,” he said.He also refused to rule out the possibility that restrictions could stay in place beyond the end of July.“We want to be irreversible so we have just got to be careful that we are there in terms of data,” he said.Professor Stephen Reicher, a member of the Scientific Pandemic Insights Group on Behaviours (Spi-B), has meanwhile warned that there is a risk the Covid situation could go “backwards”.He called on the government to provide more financial support to help people self isolate to stop the spread of the virus.Could there still be some relaxation of Covid rules?HuffPost UK last week revealed that Michael Gove said he would “bet” on some kind of “relaxation” of restrictions.Reports suggest that Johnson may delay most of the roadmap, but lift the cap on the number of people who can attend weddings, which is currently at 30.The PM may also choose to relax rules around attendance of large events to enable at least half-full stadiums at Euro 2020 games hosted at Wembley, including the final.Will there be a backlash?Polling by Opinium suggested broad public support for the government’s approach, with 54% in favour of a delay and 37% against.But there is frustration among some Conservative MPs – already unhappy over the impact on the economy and on civil liberties – at the prospect of further delay.Writing in the Mail on Sunday, Sir Graham Brady, the influential chairman of the backbench Tory 1922 Committee, said that it must be the final time.“On any reasonable assessment we should be still on target for lifting restrictions on June 21,” he wrote.“There is no excuse for this further catastrophic delay. It is unacceptable to restrict people’s most fundamental rights. And it must never ever happen again.”
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Will all restrictions ease on June 21? Won’t they? Will your wedding be able to go head, or won’t it? Will you be able to go back to work, or won’t you? There’s a tug-of-war going on – and it’s leaving us mentally exhausted. While some politicians seem to think England’s ‘unlockdown’ will go ahead as planned, scientists are screaming from the rooftops that it needs to be pushed back. All the while, our own feelings on the topic hang in the balance. Many people are waiting with baited breath to be able to reopen their business and get back to work. Others simply can’t wait to get back to some sense of normality: visiting a nightclub, attending a festival, or going to a football game.Therapist Sophie Harris also nods to those waiting to get married, who are holding off from having children until after their wedding, whose whole lives feel like they’ve come to a complete standstill. For so many people, everything hangs in the balance – and the will we/won’t we rhetoric makes it worse. Therapist and Counselling Directory member Shelley Treacher has clients who feel nervous about the reopening, while also feeling frustrated in isolation – a dichotomy faced by many. “There is also nervousness around the unpredictability of all of this,” she says. “Many feel despair that things may never change.” And it’s no wonder they feel like that, considering this is the third lockdown the UK is slowly coming out of. For the past year, there’s been a divide between what politicians and scientists say on Covid matters. We’ve seen it play out time and time again with mask-wearing, the opening of schools, and heading into lockdowns. This constant back and forth has been “one of the greatest sources of stress” for individuals who follow both the science and the politics, says therapist Grace Warwick. And so people are stuck. Do you read everything to stay up to date with the news, and face the differing narratives about whether we will or won’t come out of lockdown? Or avoid it – and be in the dark about what may happen?As the date approaches – Boris Johnson is expected to confirm what will happen on June 14 –  it’s important to be honest with yourself about how you feel. “In order to cope, many of us have normalised the situation that we are in,” says Warwick. “We need to acknowledge it has taken its toll in many ways and, where possible, rest and be kind to ourselves.”If the will we/won’t we narrative is starting to prove exhausting for your mental health, “it could be helpful to significantly restrict your news consumption,” says Harris. Some may find it helpful to set themselves a limit to stick to – such as once per day or once per week.Try to focus on what you can control – rather than what you can’t. “The human brain leans towards certainty and clarity,” psychotherapist Lucy Beresford told HuffPost UK. “If we don’t get it, we often make it up. This is how faulty thinking or making assumptions come about – but they don’t always help.”If you’re struggling with the day-to-day, Beresford advised: “Maintain a daily routine, eat nourishing foods and have a great sleep pattern. Be grateful for the little things in your day, and try to stay as much in the moment as possible.”If you do find yourself straying to ‘worst case scenarios’, try to distract yourself from these thoughts so they don’t become too intrusive, or interfering. And if the June 21 unlocking goes ahead and you’re worried about what that means for you – or your family’s – health, Treacher advises taking it slowly and only doing what you feel comfortable with.We know Covid spreads more in crowded indoor spaces with poor ventilation. The longer you spend in such places, the greater your Covid risk. If you can avoid these factors – while also continuing to social distance, wash your hands, wear a mask – it can help you to stay safe. “Everyone’s responses are different and equally valid. Only do what you feel comfortable with,” she says.“Refocusing on what is best for yourself, rather than what others are deciding, is key. It’s usually the case that we imagine everyone else is coping better than we are, and think we should fit in with others. Chances are, millions feel the same.”Related...What Is Meant To Happen On June 21?Wedding Limits Could Be Lifted, Even If June 21 Is DelayedHas Being So Careful During The Pandemic Altered Our Immune Systems?The Return To Work Might Not Look As You'd Hoped4 Signs You Have Intimacy Anxiety And How To Push Past It
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Burnt skin, dehydration, and end-of-day exhaustion – the same things happen during every heatwave in Britain, no matter how many times we’re told to do the opposite. The thing is, blistering hot weather doesn’t come around often in the UK – so when it does, Brits feel the need to enjoy every single second of it, before the inevitable return of the rain leaves us stuck indoors again.Considering there’s likely to be a mini heatwave starting this weekend – with highs of around 30°C in places like London – we’ve rounded up some of the mistakes Brits tend to make, and what they should be doing instead. Not putting suncream on (obviously)We can’t say these three things enough: as the song goes, wear sunscreen. You can burn even through cloud, and you should apply it throughout the day. Claire Knight, Cancer Research UK’s senior health information manager, says confusion and myths about sun safety put people at risk of skin damage.“The sun isn’t only strong abroad,” she explains. “It can be strong enough to cause damage in the UK from the start of April to the end of September.” Getting sunburnt just once every two years triples the risk of melanoma, a potentially deadly form of skin cancer. You should regularly and generously apply sun cream with at least SPF 15 and 4 or more stars, even when it’s cloudy – and remember to do your eyelids too, as they’re easy to miss out.Spreading suncream too thinlyEven if you’re using a high SPF, you could be leaving your skin vulnerable to sun damage because you’re applying sun cream too thinly. A 2019 study by King’s College London found when applied in the typical way, SPF 50 suncream provides just 40% of the protection we expect it to because we’re simply not using enough of it. In order to stay protected, the researchers suggested holidaymakers use 3ml (around half a teaspoon) of suncream on each arm, the face and the neck, plus 6ml (a full teaspoon) to each leg, the front and the back of the body. You should then reapply at least three times per day.All-day boozingThe sun sends many of us straight to a beer garden or out for a picnic. What’s better than cracking open a refreshing alcoholic beverage in the sun. And that’s okay. But the combination of sweating more in the heat, and going to the toilet more, means you’re losing more fluid than you take in.This is a fast track to dehydration unless you replace that lost fluid by drinking water, says Drinkaware. Avoid excess drinking, or make sure you pair every single boozy bevvie with a pint of water.Drinking your normal amount of waterYou need more – much, much more. We’re advised to drink around eight glasses of water per day, but you need to increase this amount when it’s hot. If you’re heading out for a picnic, pack several bottles of water in preparation.Dehydration is caused by not drinking enough water. Symptoms include: headaches, dark yellow and strong smelling urine, feeling dizzy, tiredness, dry mouth, and sweating less than usual. The general advice for curbing dehydration is taking sips of water, little and often, and gradually building up the amount you drink.Staying out in the sun all dayWe get it – why stay indoors when there’s beautiful sunshine and blue skies outdoors? But spending every single second of the day outside in a heatwave means your risk of ending up burnt, dehydrated, or with sunstroke are pretty high. Try to give yourself breaks from the heat – preferably between 11am and 3pm, suggests the NHS – and walk or sit in the shade. Thinking ‘less is more’ when getting dressedYou might be tempted to grab your tiniest shorts and tight vest for a day in the sun, but that’s not always the best option. Firstly, it means you have more skin on show to the sun, meaning you’ll need to keep topping up suncream on whatever flesh is showing. Instead, it’s best to go for light, loose-fitting cotton clothes, recommends Oxford Health. And don’t forget your hat. Burning your scalpEven if you put suncream on, our bet is you probably miss your scalp. Suncream down your parting (or right across your head if you’re on the bald side), or simply wear a hat to avoid a stingy shower the next day.Covering your head can also protect your hair, says hair expert Nicole Petty at Milk + Blush. “While hats do provide extra cover for the scalp against strong UV rays, they protect the hair from sun exposure, too,” she says. “When exposed to too much sunlight, the UVA and UVB rays can strip moisture from the hair and damage the hairs protein and cuticle, resulting in dry/brittle ends, frizziness, split ends, discolouration or even thinning.”Keeping windows and curtains open all dayOh no. No, no, no. You should close curtains on rooms that face the sun to keep indoor spaces cooler and remember it may be cooler outdoors than indoors. As simple as this may sound, keeping your blinds and curtains closed throughout the day deflects the sun’s powerful rays from heating your house. You should also keep windows closed when it’s hotter outside than inside, advises the government. Open windows at night when the air is cooler, but close ground floor windows when you leave the house or go to bed.Eating the wrong foodFoods that require more effort to digest – like those high in protein, sugar and fibre – are thought to generate more body heat, according to BBC Good Food. This includes ice cream – it cools you when you eat it, but it doesn’t last. Warm chocolate is also a no-go, reports Love Food, and a “surefire way to headache city”. If you know you’re going to crave it, put it in the fridge and enjoy the sweet chocolate snap when you break a bit off. Food can account for around 20-30% of our fluid intake, so it’s a good idea to choose things that contain more water than others. Think: watermelon, strawberries, cucumber, celery, melon. Biochemist Shirley Corriher has previously spoken about the foods that work best to keep people cool. In 2012, she said fruits and vegetables are good in hot climates as they’re packed with water, Inside Science reported.Exercise too much outdoorsNone of us like to run outdoors when it’s freezing, snowing, or raining. But just because it’s a nice day, it doesn’t mean it’s the best time to go out for a jog. The NHS suggests avoiding exercising at the hottest part of the day – so between 11am and 3pm – and avoiding strenuous exercise in the heat at any time.It might be better to go for that cycle in the early morning or evening to avoid getting dehydrated. Taking your dog out for a lunchtime walk“All animals can suffer in the heat and it’s really important that we take extra special care of our pets during extremely hot and extremely cold weather,” RSPCA animal welfare expert Dr Samantha Gaines told HuffPost UK.Dogs still need exercise, but take advantage of the cooler hours first thing in the morning and evening. “If the pavement is too hot to touch with your hands, then it’s too hot for a dog’s paws,” said Gaines. Having a glass of wine (or a cuppa) before bedYou should avoid caffeine or alcohol before bed – both cause dehydration which makes sleep harder. The ideal temperature for sleeping is between 16-18°C, according to The Sleep Council. Anything above 24°C causes restless and interrupted sleep. Before hopping into bed make sure you opt for a sheet instead of a duvet, have a good fan set up (see our guide here) and have a quick cold shower to lower your body temperature.Related...Hangovers Get Better With Age, Apparently. We Don't Believe ItHow To Tell You're Dehydrated – And What To Do If You Are12 Baby Names Beautifully Inspired By The Four Seasons10 Of The UK's Best Outdoor Swimming Pools To Live The Lido LifeThe Heatwave Hacks You Need To Cool Down When It's Boiling OutsideThese Animals Well And Truly Bossed This Week's Heatwave
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