A real photo that will either be a footnote in American history books or a photo at the beginning of chapters in history books Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Do you remember the worst, most over-the-top dystopian fiction you ever wrote?That terrible short story you hammered out in middle school, inspired by books like 1984 and Brave New World?We ve had police shooting civilians, civilians shooting police, brutal terror attacks involving trucks in France, brutal terror attacks involving guns in Orlando, Britain leaving the EU and destabilizing the world economy, and American police shooting people on the ground who have their hands in the air, later explaining that they were actually aiming at the autistic man who was holding a toy truck.Yes, everything has always been bad.The 1930s had the Great Depression; the 1940s had World War II and the internment of Japanese-Americans; the 1950s had the Korean War and the violent oppression of black people; the 1960s had riots and the Vietnam War; the 1970s had Watergate and averaged an airplane hijacking every two weeks... but are things really worse here in 2016?
Bonus story: The saga of the five-inch 'toothbrush' gunIt's been 37 years since The Village People's hit song In the Navy associated the armed service with an acceptance of homosexuality.It's been 38 since one of the gay movement's trailblazers, Harvey Milk, was gunned down at San Francisco city hall by fellow city supervisor Dan White.In this case, Milk's namesake will be a Military Sealift Command fleet oiler, which may sound less romantic than a battleship until you consider that the USNS Harvey Milk will be providing oil to sailors, something he would no doubt have approved of.The ship will be built in San Diego, which, coincidentally, is where the Village People filmed the video for their number one hit.The other ships in the oiler fleet will be named after former supreme court justice Earl Warren, former attorney general Robert Kennedy, women's rights activist Lucy Stone and abolitionist and women's rights activist Sojourner Truth.
Few things motivate Samsung employees like the opportunity to take advantage of weakness at Apple Inc.Earlier this year, managers at the South Korean company began hearing the next iPhone wouldn t have any eye-popping innovations.They pushed suppliers to meet tighter deadlines, despite loads of new features, another person with direct knowledge said.Just days after Samsung introduced the Note 7 in August, reports surfaced online that the phone s batteries were bursting into flame.By the end of the month, there were dozens of fires and Samsung was rushing to understand what went wrong.It announced the plans publicly before working out how millions of consumers in 10 countries would actually get replacements.Lee Kun-Hee, the Samsung patriarch who is chairman of both the electronics unit and the broader conglomerate, suffered a heart attack in 2014 and hasn t been back to the business since.
Samsung Electronics Co. determined that a problem with batteries that triggered a global recall of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones wasn t to blame for devices that burst into flame in China, saying their combustion was likely due to unspecified external heat sources.The company launched a preliminary investigation after comments circulated over the weekend on social media about two of the high-end phones sold in China igniting, mirroring complaints by Note 7 users from the U.S. to South Korea.But on Monday, Samsung and its supplier Amperex Technology Ltd. said they found no evidence of a link between its batteries and the fires.The South Korean company is grappling with its deepest crisis in years, a global recall precipitated by scores of reports that the batteries in its newest gadget were prone to sudden combustion.But it continued selling Note 7 devices in China, explaining that the power cells for phones sold there came from ATL and carried no defects.Samsung has begun an initial investigation and determined that the device s overheating had no direct link to the batteries our company produced, ATL said in a statement.We judge that the heat source originated outside of the battery, and the overheating was very possibly caused by external factors.For a Quicktake Q on Samsung s batteries, click hereSamsung announced a worldwide recall of the Note 7 -- one of its best-reviewed phones upon debut -- on Sept. 2 that could cost the company upwards of $1 billion.
Few things motivate Samsung employees like the opportunity to take advantage of weakness at Apple.They pushed suppliers to meet tighter deadlines, despite loads of new features, another person with direct knowledge said.By the end of the month, there were dozens of fires and Samsung was rushing to understand what went wrong.It announced the plans publicly before working out how millions of consumers in 10 countries would actually get replacements.Lee Kun-Hee, the Samsung patriarch who is chairman of both the electronics unit and the broader conglomerate, suffered a heart attack in 2014 and hasn t been back to the business since.His son, Jay Y. Lee, is heir apparent, but hasn t taken his father s title because Korean culture precludes such a move while the elder Lee is alive.
Photograph: Charles Pertwee/Getty Images for SoftBankBefore long, Santiago could be a city full of electric vehicles charged by smart power grids, many of them driving on highways equipped with traffic-reducing automated variable toll pricing.Perhaps a new arrival to the Chilean capital would go for the chance to found a technology company, incentivised by programmes like the state-backed, foreigner-friendly Start-Up Chile, in Chilecon Valley .Not only does South Africa s third largest city now have an increasingly tech-savvy middle class population, it has schools like the Durban University of Technology, whose Urban Futures Centre is even developing technological solutions to the common challenges of drug use, security and policing strategy.It s the birthplace of the personal computer, now home to Apple, Google, Facebook, Intel and Stanford University, and the cradle of thousands upon thousands of startups.Only in recent years have large numbers of technology companies and their workers based themselves in urban San Francisco instead of the suburban Silicon Valley, and the resulting conflicts between the long-term bohemian population and these wealthy new arrivals have exposed its real, underdeveloped technological state.
China has showed off its new J-20 fighter in public for the first time along with two jet-powered unmanned aircraft, according to reports.Two of the J-20s made a flypast at the Zhuhai airshow in Guangdong province, as reported by the BBC and the Guardian.The Chengdu J-20 is regarded as China's answer to the US F-22, itself a fairly dated design.It looks a lot like an F-22 fuselage mated with an F-35 cockpit section and with the forward canard delta wings of a Saab Gripen or a Eurofighter Typhoon grafted on; a visual mishmash of features from successful Western designs.Aviation International News is one of the few reliable English-language defence news websites to have any information about the J-20, and briefly details its electro-optical targeting system, radar and potential missile fits.You are presented with the Chinese J-20 Stealth Fighter at Zhuhai Air Show.
Today is Veterans Day in the US, and we wanted to recognize the Ars readers and staff who've served by resurfacing former Navy man Sean Gallagher's trip to his old home, the USS Iowa.His piece originally ran on May 15, 2015.A few months ago, as I was planning to head out to California for Microsoft's Build developer conference in San Francisco, I decided I needed to stretch the trip a bit further to the south—down to the Port of Los Angeles to visit the Pacific Battleship Center, the home of the battleship USS Iowa.I served on the Iowa for two years in the late 1980s, and that experience was life-changing.But I had not had a chance to see the ship in over 26 years—my last visit had been in late April of 1989, weeks after an explosion in the ship's second 16-inch gun turret took the lives of 47 men.So nearly 26 years to the day after I last visited the Iowa, I stepped aboard with my wife and daughter in tow, escorted by James Pobog—a former Navy boiler tech and the "deck boss" of the Pacific Battleship Center's volunteer Iowa crew.
You would think by now that literally everyone on Earth has heard the horrifying news that Donald Trump has been elected the next President of the United States.Even if you haven't switched on the news or looked at your phone, the shrieks of sheer horror coming from everyone are surely loud enough to make you realise that something is up.But there still might be one place where people don't know what's going on: North Korea.The so-called hermit kingdom is perhaps the most isolated country on the planet, and it strictly controls the media diet of its citizens - so it is very difficult for information to get in and out.And according to Chris Greenway, who works for BBC Monitoring - the arm of the Beeb which monitors foreign broadcasters - state media there still hasn't revealed who has won.It's now Monday in North Korea, and the state media still seem not to have told the population the result of the US presidential election.
You would think by now that literally everyone on Earth has heard the horrifying news that Donald Trump has been elected the next President of the United States.Even if you haven't switched on the news or looked at your phone, the shrieks of sheer horror coming from everyone are surely loud enough to make you realise that something is up.But there still might be one place where people don't know what's going on: North Korea.The so-called hermit kingdom is perhaps the most isolated country on the planet, and it strictly controls the media diet of its citizens - so it is very difficult for information to get in and out.And according to Chris Greenway, who works for BBC Monitoring - the arm of the Beeb which monitors foreign broadcasters - state media there still hasn't revealed who has won.It's now Monday in North Korea, and the state media still seem not to have told the population the result of the US presidential election.
Tributes are pouring in for former astronaut and senator John Glenn, who passed away Thursday.Glenn, who launched into hero status in 1962 after he became the first American to orbit the Earth, died Thursday afternoon at the James Cancer Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.John Glenn is, and always will be, Ohio s ultimate hometown hero, and his passing today is an occasion for us all to grieve, said Ohio Governor John Kasich, in a statement.The space pioneer then spent 24 years as a Democrat from Ohio in the Senate and briefly made a run for president in 1984.The Corps lost a legend today.— U.S. Marines @USMC December 8, 2016
John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth and the oldest human to travel into space, died today at 95 years old.The Ohio State University confirmed his death in a public release.The Ohio State University community deeply mourns the loss of John Glenn, Ohio s consummate public servant and a true American hero.Ohio State University President Dr. Michael V. Drake.Glenn was a Marine Corps fighter pilot who served in World War II and the Korean war.As a skilled pilot, he and six other military test pilots were selected to join the U.S. Space Program and were known as the Mercury Seven.
John Glenn, the first American to fly into orbit around the planet Earth and later a US senator for 24 years, died Thursday at a cancer hospital in Columbus, Ohio.He was 95 and the last of the living Mercury Seven astronauts.Before joining NASA, he was a marine fighter pilot and decorated hero during World War II and the Korean War.After NASA he served four terms as a US senator, often focusing on issues not related to spaceflight, such as the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons.But it wasn't the bicycle manufacturers-turned-aviators who ultimately inspired Glenn.And then I remember when I was only about—I guess I was about six or seven years old is when Lindbergh's flight occurred, and I still remember that as being an area of great interest around the community, more so than the Wright Brothers, as far as influencing me."
Some five weeks into the Presidency of Donald J. Trump, a Gallup poll shows him with a historically low approval rate—about forty per cent, far worse than any predecessor at this point in his Administration since Gallup began asking the question, in 1953, at the start of President Dwight D. Eisenhower s first term.It s predictably Trumpian, then, that his response to that embarrassing measure of unpopularity was yet another goofy tweet, this one calling for a rally of his supporters: It would be the biggest of them all!Perhaps he thinks a big, obedient crowd might lessen the rage that he s managed to unleash from his non-supporters—a significant majority—almost from the moment of his swearing-in.That may have something to do with the cruelty, and carelessness, of the policies that he lets loose, such as the so-called Muslim ban, which has so far been blocked by the courts, or the sudden reneging of promises like the one he made to protect gay, lesbian, and transgender rights, which affect some of the nation s most vulnerable citizens.It means something that so much commentary, coming so quickly, concerns ways to undo the results of the election.The Hendrickson proposal came in late April, 1951, soon after President Harry Truman fired his Far East commander, General Douglas MacArthur, during the Korean War.
Since the election, I have seen some really brutal internet slap fights.I’m sure you have too.I’ve been thinking about them a lot, and something I have noticed is that most internet fights are pitifully ineffective at actually changing anyone’s opinions.In fact, the way that most people go about fighting — you may even be strengthening the “wrong” belief of the person you’re arguing with.What should you do instead?What does this have to do with marketing anyway??
In the 1930s, she was the the first woman on Wall Street to study the male-dominated railroad industry.While generations of women before and after took risks to achieve wealth in their respective industries, many like Benham also had to navigate a culture of inequity to get there.She spent $10,000 every year for the college education of young African-Americans in the South.Her husband founded the first Coca-Cola bottling facilities.Under her leadership, The Washington Post became a publicly-traded company and a beacon for investigative journalism with its publishing of The Pentagon Papers, which studied government decisions during the Vietnam War.She supported investigations into the Watergate scandal which would lead to the resignation of President Nixon.
He's slipped the surly bonds of Earth, traveled to places and seen sights most people could only dream of, but now John Glenn is home for good.The late astronaut and US senator, who died December 8 at age 95, was laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery on Thursday morning.United States Marines carried the casket, which was draped with an American flag protected by plastic from the light spring rain.Glenn, himself a Marine Corps veteran, flew 59 combat missions in World War II and 63 during the Korean War.Marine Commandant Gen. Robert Neller presented the flag to Glenn's wife Annie, on what would have been the couple's 74th wedding anniversary."Senator Glenn was more than an astronaut," acting NASA administrator Robert Lightfoot said in a statement Thursday.
The Pentagon has disputed a report by NBC News claiming the United States is planning a preventative strike against North Korea if it decides to conduct another nuclear weapons test.Over the past week, reports have indicated that satellite images show North Korea may be planning its sixth nuclear weapons test, and the U.S. has mobilized the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier strike group into the region.A report Thursday afternoon from NBC News claimed the U.S. could strike the North Korean nuclear testing site with tomahawk missiles fired from two strategically positioned Navy destroyers if it decides to carry out the test.This has since been challenged by the Pentagon:It’s unclear who the original source of the claim was and the reasoning for making this information public.Earlier this week, North Korea threatened the U.S. with a nuclear strike if it attempted to interfere with testing, but it is not believed it has the capability to pose a serious nuclear risk at long range.
Taylor, who had suffered from Parkinson's disease, died Thursday at his home in Woodside, California, his son Kurt told the New York Times.While many people played a role in building the internet, few made as many contributions as Taylor.As a researcher for the Pentagon's Advanced Research Projects Agency in 1966, Taylor was frustrated that he had to use three separate terminals to communicate with researchers through incompatible computer systems."In a few years, men will be able to communicate more effectively through a machine than face to face," he wrote in a 1968 paper.In 1970, Taylor moved on to Xerox's famous Palo Alto Research Center, where he oversaw design and creation of the Alto, considered a pioneer in personal computers.The Alto was the first computer designed to support an operating system based on a graphical user interface, a concept to be copied by myriad operating systems to follow.
A humanitarian news agency has created a fascinating, if hugely troubling, interactive map plotting ongoing wars around the world.From the North/South Korean divide, which has been in place since the end of the Korean War in 1953, to the more recent situation in Ukraine, the map covers well-known conflicts as well as highlighting those that tend to be underreported.Each conflict is marked on the map by a red dot sized accordingly to represent how long the clash has been going on – with the larger dots representing those that have lasted the longest.Clicking on a dot will bring up a fact box explaining the nature of the conflict, when it began and how many deaths have resulted from it.The summary also confirms each conflict's current status and includes a summary of the notable impacts of the situation.The map was created by non-profit organisation IRIN (formerly the Integrated Regional Information Network) using the open-source Carto map maker.
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