A planet discovered by the Kepler space telescope just 1,200 light years away could actually support life.Kepler-62f was in fact discovered back in 2013 by the exoplanet-hunting telescope along with a number of other planets within that solar system.Shields and her team however wanted to focus on just one of those, 62f.While Kepler was able to confirm the planet s composition it could describe 62f s atmosphere, so Shields joined forces with another team from the University of Washington to find out.And this might help melt ice sheets formed at other times in the planet s orbit.Using NASA s powerful Kepler telescope, astronomers were then able to utilise a new statistical analysis method developed by Princeton University which drastically increases number of planets that can be discovered.
A planet discovered by the Kepler space telescope just 1,200 light years away could actually support life.Kepler-62f was in fact discovered back in 2013 by the exoplanet-hunting telescope along with a number of other planets within that solar system.PYLEShields and her team however wanted to focus on just one of those, 62f.While Kepler was able to confirm the planet s composition it could describe 62f s atmosphere, so Shields joined forces with another team from the University of Washington to find out.And this might help melt ice sheets formed at other times in the planet s orbit.Using NASA s powerful Kepler telescope, astronomers were then able to utilise a new statistical analysis method developed by Princeton University which drastically increases number of planets that can be discovered.
"Although it has been a major theoretical prediction in recent years, this is one of the first unambiguous pieces of observational evidence for a chaotic, cold rain feeding a supermassive black hole," said Grant Tremblay, an astronomer with Yale University and lead author on the paper.Peering through the ALMA telescope, Tremblay and his team studied an unusually bright galaxy cluster called Abell 2597.Each cloud contains as much material as a million Suns and is roughly the size of tens of light-years across, and were observed by the billion-light-year-long "shadows", they cast on earth."This very, very hot gas can quickly cool, condense, and precipitate in much the same way that warm, humid air in Earth's atmosphere can spawn rain clouds and precipitation," Tremblay said.Additional data from the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array shows that the gas clouds observed by ALMA are only about 300 light-years from the supermassive black hole, which in astronomical terms is near tipping point of being devoured.Despite having only detected three clouds, astronomers believe there may thousands of clouds floating around the black hole, waiting to be consumed, allowing it to grow to an even bigger size.
A team of researchers just confirmed the presence of oxygen in a galaxy 13.1 billion light years away—the furthest oxygen has ever been detected.Hailing from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and a number of Japanese universities, the scientists based their conclusions on observational data collected by the Atacama Large Milometer/submillimetre Array ALMA observatory.They discovered the galaxy, SXDF-NB1006-2, just four years ago, and have been trying to identify the elements that are present ever since.As the gas re-ionises, it also releases a tremendous flare of light, like you see happening in this simulation of the process over a 5 million year timelapse:Video: S. Chon / University of TokyoBecause the flare is so bright, researchers hoped that, even at a distance of 13.1 billion light years, they would still be able to detect it with ALMA.The amount is fairly tiny—less than one-tenth of the oxygen found in the sun.Artist s concept of oxygen ionising in galaxy SXDF-NB1006-2 Image: NAOJ Although this oxygen couldn t support life as we know it, Inoue said that this discovery does lead us down a fascinating path: It helps answer the question of where—and when—oxygen formed in our universe in the first place.
A jaw-dropping new photo shows a probable alien planet orbiting a star that lies 1,200 light-years from Earth.To appreciate just how fantastic it is to have a direct image of this candidate world, consider that CVSO 30 is about 280 times farther away from Earth than is Alpha Centauri, the star system nearest to our own.Alien Planet Quiz: Are You an Exoplanet Expert?If it does indeed exist, the planet circles the star at a whopping distance of 660 astronomical units AU , completing one orbit every 27,000 years, researchers said."Astronomers are still exploring how such an exotic system came to form in such a short timeframe, as the star is only 2.5 million years old; it is possible that the two planets interacted at some point in the past, scattering off one another and settling in their current extreme orbits," they added.You can read it online for free here: http://www.eso.org/public/archives/releases/sciencepapers/potw1624/potw1624a.pdfThe VLT, part of ESO's Paranal Observatory, consists of four individual telescopes, each of which has a main mirror that's 26.9 feet 8.2 meters wide.
Three hundred and twenty light years away in the Centaurus constellation sits one of the strangest planets humans have ever laid eyes on.It s four times as massive as Jupiter and orbits twice as far out as Pluto—around one of its three suns.And unlike the first triple-star exoplanet—which orbits very close to one star and very far from the other two—planet HD 131399Ab is gravitationally influenced by all three suns.I d venture to say this is the weirdest orbit of any exoplanet we ve ever found, Kevin Wagner, an astronomer at the University of Arizona and lead author on the study published in today s Science, told Gizmodo.Although astronomers have discovered thousands of exoplanets by transit photometry, only a handful of these worlds have been imaged directly.The only exoplanets we ve imaged thus far are larger than Jupiter and sit in a comparable or wider orbit, where the glare of the parent star is less intense.
Move over, Tatooine, astronomers have discovered a planet with not one, not two, but three suns.Known as HD 131399Ab, the newly discovered planet is located 320 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Centaurus.The planet is estimated to be merely 16 million years old, making it one of the youngest exoplanets discovered so far.Illustration of HD 131399Ab with its three suns / Image courtesy of ESOThe triple star system is made up of two smaller stars that twirl around together like a spinning dumbbell and a third, larger star.The two twirling stars orbit the third star at a distance of 300 astronomical units 1 astronomical unit is equal to the distance between the Earth and the sun .
Astronomers working with the Very Large Telescope in Chile have captured the deepest view yet of the heart of the Orion Nebula.Located 1,350 light-years from the sun, the Orion Nebula star-formation measures about 24 light-years across.It s visible to the naked eye, appearing as a fuzzy patch in Orion s sword.Like other nebulae, Orion is illuminated by the many hot stars that are spawned within it, along with the glowing plasma clouds that have been stripped of their electrons from the ensuing ultraviolet radiation.Scientists used the HAWK-I infrared instrument mounted to the VLT to capture this image, but it produced more than just a pretty picture.The new survey has revealed a treasure trove of low-mass objects, suggesting this stellar expanse is probably forming more low-mass objects than star formation regions.
Astronomers working with the Very Large Telescope in Chile have captured the deepest view yet of the heart of the Orion Nebula.Located 1,350 light-years from the sun, the Orion Nebula star-formation measures about 24 light-years across.It s visible to the naked eye, appearing as a fuzzy patch in Orion s sword.Like other nebulae, Orion is illuminated by the many hot stars that are spawned within it, along with the glowing plasma clouds that have been stripped of their electrons from the ensuing ultraviolet radiation.Scientists used the HAWK-I infrared instrument mounted to the VLT to capture this image, but it produced more than just a pretty picture.The new survey has revealed a treasure trove of low-mass objects, suggesting this stellar expanse is probably forming more low-mass objects than star formation regions.
And we only know that because we finally built a detector that could spot high-energy neutrinos when they travel through the Earth.Their properties—no charge and very little mass—mean that they can arrive here on Earth unobstructed by almost anything in between their source and Earth.Neutrinos generated inside the Sun, for instance, can travel right out far faster than photons, which spend time interacting with the Sun's matter.Pretty much anything you put in their way, they ll go right through; even if you had a mass of lead a light-year thick, it would only block half of the neutrinos that tried to pass through it.The reason the neutrinos can pass through solid matter is because they don t interact via the electromagnetic force—the force that prevents solid objects from falling through the ground.When it does, it produces a flash of light that can be detected.
Some 380 light years away in the constellation Scorpius lies a star that has puzzled astronomers for over 40 years.Called AR Scorpii, the star flashes brightly and fades again every couple minutes, like a lightbulb on a dimmer switch.Now, astronomers have identified the cause of the flickering, and it s a reminder that the cosmos is still rife with terrifying secrets.AR Scorpii, previously identified as a single, variable star, is actually two, a compact white dwarf the size of the Earth but 200,000 times more massive, and a cool red dwarf a third the size of the Sun.By examining the system with the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and others, astronomers have now learned that the white dwarf is spinning incredibly fast, charging up electrons to almost the speed of light.As the white dwarf twirls about, these energised particles whip through space, lashing the the cooler companion and releasing a powerful pulse of electromagnetic radiation every 1.97 minutes.
Artist s impression of the exotic binary system AR Scorpii, with a compact white dwarf star right flogging its red dwarf companion with high energy electrons every two minutes.Image: M. Garlick/University of Warwick/ESOSome 380 light years away in the constellation Scorpius lies a star that has puzzled astronomers for over 40 years.Called AR Scorpii, the star flashes brightly and fades again every couple minutes, like a lightbulb on a dimmer switch.Now, astronomers have identified the cause of the flickering, and it s a reminder that the cosmos is still rife with terrifying secrets.AR Scorpii, previously identified as a single, variable star, is actually two, a compact white dwarf the size of the Earth but 200,000 times more massive, and a cool red dwarf a third the size of the Sun.
The Earth isn t particularly close to any black holes—the closest candidate, A0620-00, is around 2,800 light years away—so good on us for picking a nice cosmic neighborhood to live in.But besides the whole nothing escapes from them thing and the hugely destructive supernova preceding their birth, black holes are bad news.They could end life as we know it, even from far away.Right after a star collapses into a black hole or two stars collide to do the same a tremendous amount of energy is released as a gamma ray burst, Kurzgesagt explains.The ozone layer around Earth generally protects us from the gamma rays given off by our own sun, but a full-blown gamma ray burst is so much more powerful that it would cook the side of our planet that came in contact with it.Gamma rays are also capable of blowing apart the bonds in our DNA.
Neutrinos transmute from one form into one another thanks to their inexplicable mass.Experiments have fleetingly hinted at a fourth for a couple decades, the so-called sterile neutrino.Today, though, the IceCube experiment, a particle detector at the South Pole that uses the ice itself to measure neutrinos, has shown that those hints were probably just a mirage.After a years of analysis, researchers haven t found anything.An experimenter could aim a beam of them at a light-year of lead and about half would pass right on through, completely unfazed by the six trillion miles of radiation-blocking metal.At least, the three known flavors of neutrinos—electron, muon, and tau—would.
Proxima b is a likely target for Starshot projectArtist's impression of Proxima b and Proxima Centauri Photo credit: ESO/M.Rumours that a terrestrial planet orbiting Proxima Centauri – the Sun s closest neighbour – may be Earth-like have been confirmed today in a paper published in Nature.The possibility that extraterrestrial life may exist next door was first reported last week in Der Spiegel, a German weekly news magazine.It orbits around Proxima Centauri, a red-dwarf located only 4.25 light years away in the closest star system, Alpha Centauri.It s much closer to its star than the Earth is to the Sun at 0.05 astronomical units away, so a year only lasts 11.2 days.
Jodie Foster in Contact 1997 .Astronomers using the RATAN-600 radio telescope in the Russian Republic of Karachay-Cherkessia have detected an unusual signal emanating from a star located about 94 light-years from Earth.It s not clear if the signal is being transmitted by aliens, but the researchers say we should keep a close watch on this intriguing new extraterrestrial candidate.As reported by Paul Gilster at Centauri Dreams, the anomalous signal was detected by an international team of astronomers back on May 15, 2015.The researchers, led by N. N. Brusilov, describe a strong signal in the direction of HD164595, a planetary system located in the constellation Hercules.The finding is set to be discussed at a meeting of the IAA SETI Permanent Committee on September 27, 2016.
An international group of astronomers has detected an interesting radio signal spike, one that could possibly be of alien origin, from a star system located 95 light-years away.Few details have been released so far, but more information about the finding will be announced at the International Astronautical Congress IAC , which will be held in Guadalajara, Mexico during the last week of September.Of course, it is very likely that the radio spike was produced by something else entirely, like Earth-based radio interference or even a technical glitch in the observing equipment.However, these follow-up observations from other organizations have not yet been possible because those who detected the signal sat on the discovery for over a year for unknown reasons.It s believed that if ET were to attempt contact, it would likely be through powerful radio waves, which travel through the universe at the speed of light.If we wanted to send a message to a civilization far away, this is what we d do, so for now, we assume that intelligent aliens would do the same.
To view this page ensure that Adobe Flash Player version 10.2.0 or greater is installed.In May 2015, researchers using a radio telescope in Russia detected a candidate SETI search for extraterrestrial intelligence signal that seems to originate from HD 164595, a star system that lies about 94 light-years from Earth, the website Centauri Dreams reported over the weekend.The astronomers have not yet published a study about the detection; they plan to discuss it next month at the 67th International Astronautical Congress IAC in Guadalajara, Mexico, according to Centauri Dreams' Paul Gilster, who wrote that one of the team members forwarded him the IAC presentation.13 Ways to Hunt Intelligent Alien Life HD 164595 is known to harbor one planet — a roughly Neptune-mass world that orbits too close to the star to support life as we know it.However, it's possible that other worlds lurk undiscovered in the system, said astronomer Seth Shostak of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, who is not part of the detection team.
About 1,600 light years away, in the constellation Orion, an interstellar cloud of gas and dust called Messier 78 is hiding a stellar nursery of young and unborn stars.As explained by the European Southern Observatory ESO , new stars form inside the nebula out of dust grains in pockets just barely warmer than their extremely cold surroundings, which are shrunken and heated up by gravity.But the gleaming young stars escape telescopes that see in visible light, radio waves, or infrared light because the cosmic dust either blocks or absorbs their bluish light.That s why Messier 78 is called a reflection nebula: it reflects and scatters the light of its hidden stars.Now, ESO s Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope VISTA has sifted through the dust by using near-infrared light, which is why the ESO refers to it as a dustbuster.The result is a spectacular view of the young stars in the heart of the nebula casting a bluish pall over their surroundings, while red fledgling stars peer out from their cocoons of cosmic dust.
talked about the Earth-like planet called Proxima BBack in August we first .The cool bit about this planet is that it is relatively close to the Earth and is believed to be potentially life supporting.Proxima B lies 4.25 light-years from the Earth and is orbiting the star Proxima Centauri.Now a few months after we first heard about the planet and scientists are talking up something even more interesting.Teams of scientists believe that Proxima B might have oceans of liquid water on the surface.
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