Forget everything you were taught in biology – plants don't need sunlight to grow.Growing Underground is a farm 33 metres below Clapham, south London, swapping sunlight for LEDs."Over the past three to five years, LED development has reached the stage where we can grow without any natural light whatsoever," says Steven Dring, who founded the project with fellow Bristolian Richard Ballard."You can even change the light spectrum to cater to the different plants that you're growing."Growing Underground's focus is on the leafier vegetables, from microherbs to baby leaf salad."What's new about the latest lights is that you can stack them very close to the crops, 25cm away, if not closer," says Dring, "so you can layer products and lights on top of products and lights."
Android Pay is now available in UK allowing you to complete contactless payments from your Android phone.We got the chance to test out the tech at a coffee shop in Central London as well as on the London Underground – and the tech works great.Sadly there's no word on Android Wear support for Android Pay yet, something Apple has managed to include on its Watch device.Android Pay allows you to make payments up to £100 as well, but anything above the £30 limit will require you to enter your pattern, PIN or fingerprint.It's currently trialling a feature called Hands Free where you can walk into a store and just say "I'd like to pay with Google" to make your transaction.Google is also launching Android Pay Day, a service that offers exclusive codes and deals to customers who use the service.
Android Pay has launched in the UK GoogleAndroid Pay has finally arrived in the UK on Wednesday 18 May 2016 , meaning that you can now pay for goods and services using an Android smartphone using Google's contactless payments system.Working in much the same way as rival systems Apple Pay and Samsung Pay, Android Pay essentially a rebranded, much-improved version of Google Wallet allows you to carry out transactions at contactless NFC payment terminals by tapping your phone against them – provided you've first downloaded and installed the Android Pay app.Here's a rundown of what you need to know to get you up and running.After downloading the Android Pay app from the Play Store, boot it up and select the Google account you want to link it with.You can also use Android Pay to get around on the London Underground and buses.Bank of Scotland, First Direct, Halifax, HSBC, Lloyds Bank, M Bank, MBNA and Nationwide are supporting Android Pay at launch, but Barclay's, NatWest and Santander customers are out of luck.
They find that we split the task into a hierarchy of different jobs, with different elements apparently handled in different parts of the brain.Particular parts of the cortex, for example, show greater activity if extra line changes are required; other regions simply become more excited as the overall goal inches closer.This type of strategy is much more efficient than rattling through all the possible ramifications of each individual step - such as a simple computer program might do.Sure enough, when people played the game, they took longer to think about their journeys if they had to "change trains" multiple times, but not if the overall number of "stations" was high.And there were corresponding patterns of brain activity, suggesting that some brain areas were indeed evaluating the situation "line by line" - and even showed a characteristic flutter of activity when someone switched between those lines.Because of the fiendish number of possible moves a player can make, this latter challenge is precisely the sort of task that could be assisted by streamlined, hierarchical processing.
It's going to work on the London Underground.6.The company voided two years' worth of blood tests.7.The NHS Royal Free Trust is still using Streams.9.Apple sent engineers to a customer's house after iTunes deleted a load of his music.Customers keep complaining that signing up to Apple Music causes music to be deleted.10.Rocket Internet's billionaire founder is backing a 'proptech' startup that wants to simplify renting.
By 2021, debit cards and contactless payments will eclipse cash, says Payments UK.Since the start of 2016, contactless use has gathered pace, particularly on the London Underground network.On the high street, one in six card purchases are now contactless, with Tesco leading the way.The Payments Council, the predecessor to Payments UK, provoked a storm of protest in 2009 when it proposed a complete withdrawal of cheques by 2018.Its annual report charts the changing nature of how British households choose to spend their money.Figures from the UK Cards Association show that in the first six months of 2015 there was £516,500 of fraudulent transactions on contactless cards – the equivalent of 2p for every £100 spent using the technology.
TfL s having a party, so bring your booze books and your char-ming selves down to your local Underground station if it s on the Central or Victoria line on the evening of August 19th.Yes, almost 12 months after it was originally supposed to get going, the 24-hour Tube service is actually going to creak into action.First to get the all-night treatment will be the Central and Victoria lines, with the Piccadilly, Jubilee and Northern to follow in the autumn.Pissed-up boozehounds will be able to catch six trains per hour between 00.30 and 05.30 when the Friday and Saturday night service arrives, though this will be increased to eight per hour on the notoriously sardine-tin-like Northern line.I have made getting the Night Tube up and running a priority, and London Underground has now confirmed that services on the first two lines will launch on 19 August, said new Mayor of London Sadiq Khan.The Night Tube is absolutely vital to my plans to support and grow London s night time economy - creating more jobs and opportunities for all Londoners.
TfL s having a party, so bring your booze books and your char-ming selves down to your local Underground station if it s on the Central or Victoria line on the evening of August 19th.Yes, almost 12 months after it was originally supposed to get going, the 24-hour Tube service is actually going to creak into action.First to get the all-night treatment will be the Central and Victoria lines, with the Piccadilly, Jubilee and Northern to follow in the autumn.Pissed-up boozehounds will be able to catch six trains per hour between 00.30 and 05.30 when the Friday and Saturday night service arrives, though this will be increased to eight per hour on the notoriously sardine-tin-like Northern line.I have made getting the Night Tube up and running a priority, and London Underground has now confirmed that services on the first two lines will launch on 19 August, said new Mayor of London Sadiq Khan.The Night Tube is absolutely vital to my plans to support and grow London s night time economy - creating more jobs and opportunities for all Londoners.
This week she demonstrated and researchers from Germany, the Netherlands, Britain, Israel and Turkey, they arrived at a seminar in Linkoping, where a large number of representatives from the police authorities in different EU countries participated. - It has mainly been about the possibilities to act against a suspected suicide bomber, that is not an identified, but one suspect, says Anna Pettersson to new technologies. Part of the background to the project is that the British police in 2005 shot and killed an innocent student of the London Underground, when chased four suspected suicide bomber who was on the run. - Improvised sprängladdingar used by terrorists, can look like almost any shape, says Anna Pettersson. - It is innovative with our ballistic protection, is that it is transportable and can fit in a bag or box. But all that easy is not.
To help spread the huge cost of a flagship phone most consumers opt for a monthly contract from a mobile operator.These deals range from £20 to £50 per month and bring users free calls, texts and a limited amount of mobile data.A standard iPhone 6 deal will set you back around £30 per month on a two year contract – a total cost of £720.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00Playback Rate1ChaptersChapterssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsFullscreenThis is a modal window.Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-OpaqueBackground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent TransparentWindow --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent TransparentFont Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400%Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform DropshadowFont Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small CapsDefaults DoneMany restaurants, hotels and coffee shops have internet hotspots and you can even pick up Wi-Fi on the London Underground.This means many people are never that far away from the internet and with messaging apps now connecting everyone, mobile contracts could soon become harder to justify.
Transport for London TfL and Twitter began piloting the service on Thursday whereby customers will be alerted of severe delays on key London Underground and TfL rail services as soon as they occur.It will allow anyone who follows any combination of four existing TfL Twitter feeds to be able to opt-in to receive instant notifications about severe disruption.Currently, obtaining live travel information via Twitter means having to visit the relevant account or searching through your timeline for the latest tweets.This pilot scheme will allow notifications to be sent straight to customers' mobile devices while they are on the go, or direct to their computer, as a direct message.Sadiq Khan, Mayor of London, said: "Like every Londoner I rely on public transport to get me around and this world-first service looks set to become an essential tool for millions of Tube passengers."It is an innovative way of providing people with live updates from the Underground and contributes to my goal of making it as easy as possible to get around the capital."
We first heard about Thyssenkrupp s revolutionary horizontal/vertical elevator system a couple of years ago when it was proposed as a solution for moving people around skyscrapers in a more efficient manner.Well, the German engineering giant is still working on the technology, which it says could also be used for subway systems such as London s sprawling Underground network.The oldest system of its kind in the world, some of the London Underground s biggest stations have, over the years, become subterranean mazes of seemingly endless tunnels connecting a multitude of train lines and entry/exit points.Yes, the experience of trying to find your way among a crowd of thousands trying to find their way can be tiring for your brain as well as your legs.The system allows multiple cabins to travel safely up one shaft and down another in a single continuous loop, the company explains on its website.Chris Williamson, co-founder and partner at architecture firm Weston Williamson, said: For most commuters it is … important to swiftly and comfortably access the deepest platform and to move quickly from station A to B. Williamson suggests that Thyssenkrupp s rope-less elevator technology has the potential to redefine existing infrastructure, and open up unprecedented levels of access both in between platforms, and from the platforms to the world above.
For most Londoners, commuting is boring and uncomfortable.Thyssenkrupp s revolutionary MULTI elevator design will use magnetic force rather than traditional cables to move around, enabling sideways movement.Also, as the elevators can move continuously in a loop, waiting time could be as little as 15-30 seconds.Chris Williamson, co-founder and partner at architecture firm Weston Williamson Partners, who took part in the panel, thinks the installation of lifts for London Underground could even increase the capacity for new lines.He said: It could allow further growth of stations below the ground, making it possible to build new train lines underneath the existing ones, to increase capacity even further.Only time will tell if the Willy Wonka-style lift will beat the red tape to be a part of our daily commute, or remain in a world of pure imagination.
The newest iteration is called Johnston100.It s meant to do two things: 1 Update Johnston so that it s as legible as possible on screens and 2 Bring back some of the soul and quirk from the original 1916 design.Off-kilter details like the diagonal bowl on the lowercase g and the unusually wide U were lost over the years, but have been reintroduced in Johnston100.Slapdash ones were added in recent years, but Monotype has carefully redrawn them to fit in with the rest of the font family.This is one way TfL is modernizing its signage; the other is through the five new weights of Johnston100.It s on desktop browsers, touch screens, and in travelers s pockets.
Transport for London is said to be in the process of chatting up a few networking providers, with the hope being one might take on the mammoth task of providing mobile phone coverage down the capital's deep transport pipes.According to the Telegraph, US small cell mobile provider Airvana is one of the companies potentially involved, although TfL's people are playing down any possible public access element of the scheme.A TfL spokesperson told the paper: "We are currently investigating if the provision of a new communications network on the Underground is possible to further improve communications for the emergency services," adding that there are currently no official plans for this to be opened up to customers.The technology needed will first be used by the emergency services, when London's services finally switch over to the new 4G voice-over-LTE and push-to-talk communications system powered by EE's network.And if it's putting the stuff down there, it'd be a bit silly not to let everyone else use clog it up with their streams and video games and charge the networks for the privilege.Telegraph via City AM Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?
Transport for London is said to be in the process of chatting up a few networking providers, with the hope being one might take on the mammoth task of providing mobile phone coverage down the capital's deep transport pipes.According to the Telegraph, US small cell mobile provider Airvana is one of the companies potentially involved, although TfL's people are playing down any possible public access element of the scheme.A TfL spokesperson told the paper: "We are currently investigating if the provision of a new communications network on the Underground is possible to further improve communications for the emergency services," adding that there are currently no official plans for this to be opened up to customers.The technology needed will first be used by the emergency services, when London's services finally switch over to the new 4G voice-over-LTE and push-to-talk communications system powered by EE's network.And if it's putting the stuff down there, it'd be a bit silly not to let everyone else use clog it up with their streams and video games and charge the networks for the privilege.Telegraph via City AM Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?
So taking the longview, since then London has exploded - hitting a population of around 9 million before WWII.Here s our pick of some of the ideas for keeping London moving that never got off the ground.When the London Passenger Transport Board the forerunner to TfL first took control of the lines in 1933, it was decided that a New Works Programme would knit together existing stations and extend the Tube network even further.Boris Proposed Road TunnelsImage Credit: TfLOf the numerous terrible legacies that Boris has left the capital, from stupid overheating buses, to stupid garden bridges and stupid cable cars, at least he was never able to get this plan into action.Though it might sound like a good idea - after all, Oslo has dug an extensive motorway network beneath it - the fatal flaw is that building roads merely induces demand.Though ludicrous, it perhaps isn t quite as insane as you might think: This was the era before airliners, when aircraft in general were much smaller.
So taking the longview, since then London has exploded - hitting a population of around 9 million before WWII.Here s our pick of some of the ideas for keeping London moving that never got off the ground.When the London Passenger Transport Board the forerunner to TfL first took control of the lines in 1933, it was decided that a New Works Programme would knit together existing stations and extend the Tube network even further.Boris Proposed Road TunnelsImage Credit: TfLOf the numerous terrible legacies that Boris has left the capital, from stupid overheating buses, to stupid garden bridges and stupid cable cars, at least he was never able to get this plan into action.Though it might sound like a good idea - after all, Oslo has dug an extensive motorway network beneath it - the fatal flaw is that building roads merely induces demand.Though ludicrous, it perhaps isn t quite as insane as you might think: This was the era before airliners, when aircraft in general were much smaller.
Created by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London UERL , the firm superimposed its own routes Bakerloo – brown, Hampstead – indigo, Piccadilly – yellow, District Railway – green and those operated by an array of independent companies, such as Central London Railway blue , City and South London Railway black , Great Northern and City Railway orange and Metropolitan Railway red on a map of the city.OK, that may be a touch strong, but promise not to forget him.Apart from the easternmost stretch of the District line – that side of London was still served predominantly by non-underground routes, though the London and Blackwall Railway had closed seven years earlier – Beck s creation managed to comfortably integrate every part of the network.TfL had no idea how to represent them neatly, experimenting with an array of symbols, shapes and sizes.The underground s publicity officer at the time who – as you can probably tell from the diagram above – wasn t a designer, decided to relieve the tube map of some of its sex appeal."Then perhaps, in about 30 years' time, we might start to see work start on new lines to relieve pressure on the existing ones by simply running parallel to them.
Created by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London UERL , the firm superimposed its own routes Bakerloo – brown, Hampstead – indigo, Piccadilly – yellow, District Railway – green and those operated by an array of independent companies, such as Central London Railway blue , City and South London Railway black , Great Northern and City Railway orange and Metropolitan Railway red on a map of the city.OK, that may be a touch strong, but promise not to forget him.Apart from the easternmost stretch of the District line – that side of London was still served predominantly by non-underground routes, though the London and Blackwall Railway had closed seven years earlier – Beck s creation managed to comfortably integrate every part of the network.TfL had no idea how to represent them neatly, experimenting with an array of symbols, shapes and sizes.The underground s publicity officer at the time who – as you can probably tell from the diagram above – wasn t a designer, decided to relieve the tube map of some of its sex appeal."Then perhaps, in about 30 years' time, we might start to see work start on new lines to relieve pressure on the existing ones by simply running parallel to them.
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