Astronaut Scott Kelly returned from a year-long sojourn in space in June.His slightly older twin, Mark Kelly, stayed home as a control—part of NASA s twin study to monitor the effects of space on the human body.But there s a physical change that NASA might not be able to measure that easily.Mark is now even older by about 5 milliseconds than his space-faring twin, thanks to special relativity.It s due to a quirky little thing called time dilation: time can slow down for one person, but not for another, because there is no such thing as a fixed frame of reference against which all motion can be measured.Two people who are moving relative to each other, wearing identical watches, will measure time differently, depending on how fast each is moving.
Astronaut Scott Kelly returned from a year-long sojourn in space in June.His slightly older twin, Mark Kelly, stayed home as a control—part of NASA s twin study to monitor the effects of space on the human body.But there s a physical change that NASA might not be able to measure that easily.Mark is now even older by about 5 milliseconds than his space-faring twin, thanks to special relativity.It s due to a quirky little thing called time dilation: time can slow down for one person, but not for another, because there is no such thing as a fixed frame of reference against which all motion can be measured.Two people who are moving relative to each other, wearing identical watches, will measure time differently, depending on how fast each is moving.
President Barack Obama on Tuesday described how the United States, aided by private companies, is well on its way to traveling to Mars and eventually living there.In a column published by CNN, Obama shared new details about how NASA and its corporate partners plan to reach Mars and return to Earth, outlining a vision much like that of billionaire business magnate Elon Musk, the founder of SpaceX.We have set a clear goal vital to the next chapter of America s story in space: sending humans to Mars by the 2030s and returning them safely to Earth, with the ultimate ambition to one day remain there for an extended time, Obama wrote.Obama referenced a quote by Apollo 17 astronaut Eugene Cernan, who said, We went to explore the Moon, and in fact discovered the Earth.U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with space shuttle Endeavour mission commander Mark Kelly R after the mission was postponed at the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida, April 29, 2011.Last month, Musk unveiled plans to make humans a multi-planet species.
When you re known as a cult-favorite band, you have a certain aural legacy that must be upheld at all times, both live and on record.From the ever-shifting whisper-to-a-scream tone of the opening opus El Dorado to the choral muscularity of Living in Fear to the royal, pulse-pounding majesty of The New Kings, FEAR displays a certain sonic sinew that every hungry new band could take a few notes from.It does come down to what the chord structures are, and what the vocal melodies and the words are, Marillion keyboardist Mark Kelly admitted to Digital Trends.Everything else you add to the arrangements can certainly help and enhance a track, but it has to stand on its own as well.During a tour break, Digital Trends did the Skype thing with Kelly across the Pond to discuss how to properly layer song mixes, how Marillion pioneered the concept of crowdfunding, and the real reasons long songs get broken up into multiple parts.Digital Trends: I think it s fair to say Marillion music lends itself to being mixed in the surround-sound format, wouldn t you agree?
Advice from an astronaut might have helped Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers perfect his Hail Mary technique.Rodgers is the modern master of this long-distance desperation heave: He's thrown three Hail Mary touchdown passes in the past 13 months, including one at the end of the first half last week, in the Packers' first-round playoff victory over the New York Giants.Rodgers and his teammates have said he tends to throw his Hail Mary passes higher than other quarterbacks do — a strategy that former NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, a veteran of four space shuttle missions, might have helped him devise.Kelly, Rodgers and entrepreneur Kevin O'Leary competed on the game show "Celebrity Jeopardy!"; their episode aired in May 2015.Rodgers came out on top, winning $50,000 for charity.
But before us Earthlings embark on a seven-month journey to the Red Planet, we need to understand how the harsh conditions of space can affect our bodies.Thankfully, astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly have willingly volunteered themselves as test subjects for NASA, which has been studying the pair since they ve returned from their respective voyages in space: the identical twin brothers are the subject of a 10-part investigation to understand the impact of space travel on the body.Researchers collected blood samples and other biological materials while the twins were both on Earth and in orbit, and are now comparing them for the aptly-named Twins Study.Samples taken before, during and after Scott Kelly s most recent mission—in which he spent 340 days in space— reveal ed changes in gene expression, DNA methylation and other biological markers, Nature reports.According to the team of scientists leading the study, these changes are likely to be attributable to Scott s lengthy stay in space.The team presented their preliminary findings on January 26th at a meeting of scientists working in NASA s Human Research Programme in Galveston, Texas.
Thought experiment...if you built a bedroom sized room at the center of the Earth, and you are in that room, which way is down?All you need is the mass of the Earth, the mass of a human, and the distance between the center of the Earth and the surface of the Earth.In SI units, which most physicists use, this is gives you the prefix yotta.Photographed from a shuttle training aircraft, space shuttle Endeavour and its six-member STS-134 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station.Onboard are NASA astronauts Mark Kelly, commander; Greg H. Johnson, pilot; Michael Fincke, Andrew Feustel, Greg Chamitoff and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, all mission specialists.STS-134 will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 AMS , Express Logistics Carrier-3, a high-pressure gas tank and additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper to the International Space Station.
Wednesday marks the 14th anniversary of the Columbia Space Shuttle disaster, in which seven astronauts lost their lives as the craft broke up during reentry on February 1, 2003.Mark Kelly, a retired astronaut and the brother of astronaut Scott Kelly— both of whom are known for NASA s Twin Study— took to Twitter to commemorate the tragic anniversary.Remembering the 7 astronauts lost aboard Columbia 14 years ago today, he wrote.They were brave explorers and really good people.The Columbia Shuttle was the second time the space agency lost a vehicle in a catastrophic accident: the first, of course, was Challenger, in 1986.NASA recently marked another very sad occasion, with the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 1 capsule fire, in which three astronauts died.
Last March, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth after spending nearly one year in space.During his 340 days aboard the International Space Station, or ISS, scientists were also observing Scott's identical twin brother Mark Kelly while he hungThe goal was to look at the changes in the human
In the name of science, former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly recently shoved himself into the top of a rocket, accelerated to 17,500 mph, and fell around Earth for 340 days — nearly an entire year.The lack of gravity, radiation exposure, Kelly's diet, and other facts of life in orbit affected his body in significant ways — including, as NASA is learning now, even his genetic blueprint.The Twin Study, which is still in progress, uses Scott Kelly's identical twin brother and fellow former astronaut, Mark Kelly, to unmask the subtle but important effects of long-duration space travel on the human body.Business Insider's Dina Spector reported on some of the most fascinating preliminary results of the study, which NASA released at the end of January, including bodily changes caused by the possible existence of a "space gene."Here are eight other biological oddities that happen to your body if you're in space for a year.
But before us Earthlings embark on a seven-month journey to the Red Planet, we need to understand how the harsh conditions of space can affect our bodies.Thankfully, astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly have willingly volunteered themselves as test subjects for NASA, which has been studying the pair since they ve returned from their respective voyages in space: the identical twin brothers are the subject of a 10-part investigation to understand the impact of space travel on the body.Researchers collected blood samples and other biological materials while the twins were both on Earth and in orbit, and are now comparing them for the aptly-named Twins Study.Samples taken before, during and after Scott Kelly s most recent mission—in which he spent 340 days in space— reveal ed changes in gene expression, DNA methylation and other biological markers, Nature reports.According to the team of scientists leading the study, these changes are likely to be attributable to Scott s lengthy stay in space.The team presented their preliminary findings on January 26th at a meeting of scientists working in NASA s Human Research Programme in Galveston, Texas.
World View’s new spaceport in Tucson, Arizona is focused on a unique task: Launching high altitude balloons that will take equipment, and eventually people, to the Earth’s stratosphere to do work in an edge-of-space operating theater.We got the chance to go to the facility’s grand opening, and interview CEO and co-founder Jane Poynter, as well as co-founder and former NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, and CTO Taber McCallum.Bonus: Some incredible footage captured by the many missions World View has already run, which gives you a tantalizing sneak peek at thew view aspiring tourists can hope to see when the company eventually begins paid trips, with tickets starting at $75,000 per seat.
Are you getting the results you hoped for?Are you reaching your goals?“A KPI is a measurable value that demonstrates how effectively a company is achieving key business objectives”Mark Kelly of Salsa Labs has made a list of the most common KPIs for nonprofits and organized them in four categories: 'fundraising', 'donor retention', 'email' and 'social media'.For example, if you're trying to develop a major gift program, you might want to isolate major gifts.To calculate: Add up how many gifts your organization received over a certain period of time.
The argument over whether technology could be detrimental to the development of children has been raging for years, however a recent study has revealed that three quarters of UK parents believe tech has actually boosted their child's development.In a survey of 2,000 UK adults a significantly large 74% claim technology has improved their children's problem solving skills while 64% say it has improved their child's writing skills.While many parents have winced every time they've needed to get out the iPad and long feared over what screen time could be doing to the development of babies and toddlers, it seems the majority are now embracing the digital landscape.The survey revealed an overwhelming proportion of parents (91%) recognise the necessity of getting children using and playing with technology in order to get them up-to-speed with the contemporary world, where they'll encounter computers and tablets at school."Incorporating gadgets such as tablets, laptops and smartphones into interactive play with children is a good way to familiarise them with today's technology.There are plenty of apps designed to boost literacy, mathematical and motor skills in children.
Next week, the sun is going to be blocked out — hopefully, by the moon, rather than a hail of ICBMs.A rare solar eclipse will be visible from part of the US mainland for the first time in decades, but if you’re not in the eclipse corridor, never fear.Thanks to the wonders of modern technology and cable news, you’ll be able to experience the solar eclipse from anywhere with an internet connection, with zero risk of frying your eyes at the same time.CNN is planning on streaming the entire eclipse beginning to end, with coverage being anchored by CNN’s science correspendent Rachel Crane, and astronaut Mark Kelly.CNN has a number of 4K 360-degree cameras positioned across the country to follow the path of the eclipse from start to finish.The event starts at 1PM ET on August 21st, and you can follow CNN’s coverage on CNN.com/eclipse.
UK-based gadget retailer DronesDirect is offering a bizarre variant of the DJI Phantom 4 drone that can walk your dog without you needing to pilot it.Dog owners looking for a more high-tech solution to the conventional walk can ask the online retailer to produce a "customised drone fitted with a retractable leash and built-in collision avoidance to stop it smashing into things", says The Sun.Users will need to enter the route into their smartphone, the newspaper says, "before sitting back while your drone takes your dog out for a walk."The canine companion, which costs £1,999, can "stay airborne for 30 minutes" and "has a range of up to 2km", says The Mirror.It will also "live-stream the entire walk to your mobile phone" using its built-in camera.Mark Kelly, the company's marketing chief, says: "The launch of the innovative Dog Drone is a great alternative for pet owners who lead busy lives by giving the option of hands-free walking."
NASA's Twins Study preliminary results have revealed that space travel causes an increase in methylation, the process of turning genes on and off, and additional knowledge in how that process works."Some of the most exciting things that we've seen from looking at gene expression in space is that we really see an explosion, like fireworks taking off, as soon as the human body gets into space," Twins Study Principal Investigator Chris Mason, Ph.D., of Weill Cornell Medicine, said."With this study, we've seen thousands and thousands of genes change how they are turned on and turned off.This happens as soon as an astronaut gets into space, and some of the activity persists temporarily upon return to Earth."When retired twin astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth in March 2016, the Twins Study research intensified with investigators collecting samples from him and his twin brother, retired astronaut Mark Kelly.The researchers began combining the data and reviewing the enormous amount of information looking for correlations.
When NASA astronaut Scott Kelly stood up last March after spending a year in space, he was two inches taller.Kelly is part of a study NASA is conducting to assess how the human body changes as a result of space travel, using Scott Kelly and his twin brother Mark Kelly as subjects.While Scott spent 340 days aboard the International Space Station, Mark stayed on Earth, giving NASA the rare opportunity to compare two identical sets of DNA — one that has been exposed to the stressors of space, and one that has not."We can observe the entire human biological system responding to space flight," Christopher Mason, a principal investigator on the NASA Twins study and an associate professor at Weill Cornell Medical College, told Business Insider.Researchers already knew that taking our bodies for a jaunt outside Earth's protective atmosphere has plenty of effects on the human body, like stretching your spine, shrinking your muscles, and messing up your sleep cycle — but the effects of long-term exposure to space have been less well-known.Mason said they've seen "thousands and thousands of genes change how they are turned on and turned off," almost immediately once an astronaut reaches space.
Jaws dropped as Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai announced on Twitter Monday that he had grown 3.5 inches in the span of just three weeks while aboard the International Space Station (ISS).This is the most I’ve grown in three weeks since junior high school.I am a little worried I won’t fit in my seat on the return trip on Soyuz,” Kanai tweeted, referring to the Russian Soyuz TMA spacecraft that transports crews to and from the ISS.He had actually grown 0.9 inches – 2.6 inches less than he initially claimed.“It appears I can fit on Soyuz, so I’m relieved.”Kanai’s initial statistic seemed staggering, but it’s actually not that uncommon for astronauts to experience rapid growth spurts during their first weeks away from Earth.
Technology has grown in every sector, which has pointed to workers placing it top of the priority list when searching for a new job.According to new research British workers are placing technology on the pedestal when searching for a new job.The survey, commissioned by LaptopsDirect.co.uk, revealed that over half of Brits (53%) said that the standard of technology a company has a significant impact on considering a job or not.In total 37% said they would decline a job based on poor hardware alone.Respondents to the survey believe technology is an important factor when considering a job because almost three quarters (74%) believe it makes them more productive.Almost half (45%) of respondents said the standard of technology was valued higher than flexible working, 39% said working environment was important ant only 33% valued staff discounts.
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