"The Wings of Songs" premiered in China on March 28 and is about a Uyghur, a Kazakh, and a Han Chinese man forming a musical group.
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Clearview AI violated Canada’s privacy laws by scraping photos of citizens from the internet without permission, the country’s regulators announced on Tuesday. The controversial firm provides software to law enforcement agencies that can match photos of faces to a database of more than 3 billion images. Canada’s privacy watchdogs said this creates a risk of significant harm to the public. They noted that people whose images are captured in Clearview’s database could be misidentified or exposed to data breaches. “What Clearview does is mass surveillance and it is illegal,” said Daniel Therrien, Canada’s privacy commissioner. “It is completely unacceptable for millions… This story continues at The Next Web
Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Clearview AI’s facial recognition amounts to mass surveillance and the company should delete the faces of Canadians from its database, Canada’s privacy commissioners said Wednesday. Commissioner Daniel Therrien said what Clearview does — scraping photos from social media and other public sites for use by law enforcement — is “illegal” and creates a system that “inflicts broad-based harm on all members of society, who find themselves continually in a police lineup.” The commissioners released a report that follows a yearlong investigation by several Canadian privacy agencies into Clearview’s practices, which found the company had collected highly sensitive biometric information without consent and that it “used and disclosed Canadians’... Continue reading…
(University of Cambridge) A panel of experts have outlined key biosecurity questions facing policymakers - "from brain-altering bioweapons to mass surveillance through DNA". Recently published, the exercise - conducted shortly before COVID-19 - follows a 'horizon scan' led by the same researchers on areas of bioengineering that "could prove even more impactful, for better or worse, than the current pandemic."
Five-year legal battle pays off. Now countries have to figure out what to do Analysis  Mass surveillance programs run by the UK, French and Belgian governments are illegal, Europe’s top court has decided in a huge win for privacy advocates.…
A predictive policing system used in the Netherlands discriminates against Eastern Europeans and treats people as “human guinea pigs under mass surveillance,” new research by Amnesty International has revealed. The “Sensing Project” uses cameras and sensors to collect data on vehicles driving in and around Roermond, a small city in the southeastern Netherlands. An algorithm then purportedly calculates the probability that the driver and passengers intend to pickpocket or shoplift, and directs police towards the people and places it deems “high risk.” The police present the project as a neutral system guided by objective crime data. But Amnesty found that it’s specifically designed to identify people of Eastern… This story continues at The Next Web
‘Certain foreign governments’ can’t be allowed to conduct mass surveillance “Certain foreign governments” should not be allowed to access technology that would let them deploy facial recognition technology as a tool of mass surveillance, says IBM government and regulatory affairs veep Christopher A. Padilla.…
Edward Snowden said Keith Alexander was, "personally responsible for the unlawful mass surveillance programs that caused a global scandal."
NSA's illegal mass surveillance did not help thwart terror plot, court says.
The best way to avoid mass surveillance is to build systems that don’t collect personal data in the first place
Increase in need for safety in risk-prone areas, transition from analog surveillance to IP cameras, and integration of IoT in surveillance cameras drive the global video surveillance market.On the other hand, trend of smart cities development and rise in adoption toward spy and hidden cameras create new opportunities in the coming years.According to the report, the global video surveillance industry garnered $42.94 billion in 2019, and is estimated to reach $144.85 billion by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 14.6% from 2020 to 2027.Covid-19 scenarioCountries such as China, India, Israel, Singapore, and others have been utilizing mass surveillance tools to track spread COVID-19 and quarantined patients.Strict video surveillance at hotspots and containment zones with the help of drones and CCTV cameras will play an important role in maintaining law and order during lockdown.Many experts have questioned the privacy and security of data collected from various video surveillance tools.The IP surveillance segment to maintain its lead position by 2027Based on system type, the IP surveillance segment accounted for the largest market share in 2019, holding more than half of the global video surveillance market, and is estimated to maintain its lead position during the forecast period.This is attributed to surge in adoption of network cameras.However, the hybrid surveillance segment is estimated to maintain the highest CAGR of 17.5% from 2020 to 2027, owing to increase in hybrid recorder demand.Read Full News: https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/Video-Surveillance-market The commercial segment to maintain its dominant share during the forecast periodBased on application, the commercial segment accounted for nearly one-fourth of the global video surveillance market in 2019, and is projected to maintain its dominant share during the forecast period.This is due to increase in demand for safety in commercial spaces.
The power to end it is in your hands.
The global automatic number plate recognition system market size is expected to reach USD 3.0 billion by 2025, registering a CAGR of 6.8% during the forecast period, according to a new report by Grand View Research Inc. Advancements in traffic monitoring technologies have given rise to a mass surveillance technology that helps in capturing images of vehicles and identifying the license number.In addition, it can also facilitate in the detection of lost or stolen vehicles.Governments around the globe are emphasizing on the development of smart cities.Various governments are entering in partnerships with companies such as Honeywell International, Inc.; AT Siemens; and IBM Corporation for the development of traffic management programs that bodes well for the market growth.Governments are focusing on the development of self-operated fuel stations and electric vehicle charging stations, especially in Europe.During day-time, petrol stations in many European countries such as U.K., Germany, and France are operated in self-service modes.Overcrowded roads in the cities have put immense pressure on the civic bodies to develop technologically advanced solutions to deal with the road safety issues.This is a major factor instrumental for the implementation of automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) system for the monitoring of traffic violation and crime incidents.
DEC 27, 2019: The global automatic number plate recognition system market size is expected to reach USD 3.0 billion by 2025, registering a CAGR of 6.8% during the forecast period, according to a new report by Radiant Insights Inc. Advancements in traffic monitoring technologies have given rise to a mass surveillance technology that helps in capturing images of vehicles and identifying the license number.In addition, it can also facilitate in the detection of lost or stolen vehicles.Governments around the globe are emphasizing on the development of smart cities.Under the umbrella of smart cities, the development of intelligent transportation systems is a major trend.Various governments are entering in partnerships with companies such as Honeywell International, Inc.; AT Siemens; and IBM Corporation for the development of traffic management programs that bodes well for the market growth.During day-time, petrol stations in many European countries such as U.K., Germany, and France are operated in self-service modes.To Request A Sample Copy Of This Report @:   https://www.radiantinsights.com/research/automatic-number-plate-recognition-systems-market/request-sampleOvercrowded roads in the cities have put immense pressure on the civic bodies to develop technologically advanced solutions to deal with the road safety issues.In recent years, there has been a rise in the number of automobile crimes such as vehicular homicide, carjacking, hit and run, and reckless driving that has forced the law enforcement agencies to adopt ANPR system for the recognition of vehicles.
The Indian government has played down fears of mass surveillance in response to concerns that its proposed facial recognition system lacks adequate oversight.Replying to a legal notice filed by the Internet Freedom Foundation (IFF), a Delhi-based non-profit that works on digital liberties, the country’s National Crime Record Bureau (NCRB) defended the move, stating it doesn’t interfere with privacy of citizens as it “only automates the existing police procedure of comparing suspects’ photos with those listed in LEA’s [Law Enforcement Agency] databases.”It also dismissed concerns of misidentification and discriminatory profiling, and said the project will only be used to identify missing people and unidentified dead bodies.The need for facial recognitionThe move comes after NCRB opened bids from private companies in June to help develop a facial recognition system — dubbed National Automated Facial Recognition System (NAFRS) — that would allow law enforcement to match people of interest against an existing database of facial images.“This would greatly facilitate the investigation of crime and detection of criminals and provide information for easier and faster analysis,” the tender document said.
Six years after leaking documents about the National Security Agency's mass surveillance activities, Edward Snowden believes the world is changing.He recognizes that people are more aware of privacy problems and angrier about them than ever, but he still seems to want people to take more time to understand the specific "abuse" being committed against them.Snowden hit out at big tech companies, saying they make populations vulnerable by collecting data and allowing it to be accessed by governments."These people are engaged in abuse, particularly when you look at Google and Amazon, Facebook and their business model," he said."And yet every bit of it, they argue, is legal.He fled first to Hong Kong, and was later granted asylum in Russia, where he still resides.
Microsoft reportedly funded an Israeli startup that makes facial recognition used to secretly monitor Palestinians living in the West Bank.The firm also reportedly tested out experimental facial recognition functions on Palestinians, marketing the results to other clients across the globe.As public scrutiny builds over facial-recognition technology and its impact on privacy and civil liberties, Microsoft has positioned itself as a moral leader, publishing six guiding principles on facial recognition and pledging never to use the tech in a way that threatens "people's democratic freedoms."But Microsoft's investments in a controversial Israeli facial recognition startup is raising questions about its commitment to those principles.The investment drew immediate backlash from human rights advocates including the ACLU, Forbes reported.Since then, investigations by NBC News and Haaretz have shined more light on AnyVision's operations, describing how the firm's software is being used by the Israeli military to secretly conduct mass surveillance of West Bank Palestinians.
China has already invested heavily in snooping against its own citizens.This is a modal window.No compatible source was found for this media.Privacy may be an alien concept in a surveillance state, yet anytime it takes a further drastic step towards eliminating any figment of privacy, we are still surprised.China is amplifying its surveillance capabilities to unprecedented levels and it is now trying to gain access to apps that have end-to-end encryption.The country has now passed a law that will allow it to regulate cryptography in both government and private use data starting January 1, 2020.
FBI's use of National Security Agency (NSA) data has been contentious ever since the details of mass surveillance were revealed by its contractor Edward Snowden in 2013.A Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has now ruled that FBI officials "improperly" searched through NSA records.This ruling puts a shadow on how American intelligence agencies collect surveillance data.It includes both upstream and downstream data and has been collected in the past under section 702 of the Foreign Intelligent Surveillance Act.The court found thousands of searches conducted between 2017 and 2018.Improper searches are in direct violation of the Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution.
Joseph Gordon-Levitt has some strong thoughts about YouTube and Instagram.The actor and director said Wednesday that the platforms are a "net negative" for human creativity."This business model is bad for people's creativity, especially young people," Gordon-Levitt said at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco."If you're setting out to make a short film, for example, and you already have on your mind, 'What's going to get me the most likes, followers, subscribers, etc.,' that's not the creative process that's going to make you the most happy as a creative person."Gordon-Levitt is the founder of HitRecord, an online community where people collaborate on creative projects ranging from film to music to writing.While plenty of beautiful content and communities exist on YouTube and Instagram, Gordon-Levitt said, he has an issue with business models that offer "free" services in exchange for "the right to conduct mass surveillance" and apply machine-learning algorithms to massive data sets for the benefit of third-party advertisers.
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