Report authors call on gov.UK, business to up their spendLeaving the EU could mean UK universities lose a whopping £1bn research funding, according to report released by Digital Science today.Their data showed the UK was the fifth-largest producer of science and technical articles behind USA, China, Japan and Germany, despite receiving just 1.63 per cent from public and private sectors in research.Figures from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development reveal that investment from UK companies contribute only 1.06 per cent of GDP toward research and development.This is below the average of many European countries and is almost 80 per cent lower than the R investment made by German businesses.Should the UK vote to leave next month, the report stresses that significant political efforts will need to be made to plug the funding gap and avoid long-term damage to the research and education sector .Ridley said that some of the biggest scientific organisations including The European Space Agency, The European Molecular Biology Organisation and CERN, were not EU-membership exclusive and was unfair if the EU parliament held the power to decide how money was spent.
During my undergraduate degree in Human Anatomy, I found the brain and it was my first love!I became particularly interested in how our brain cells communicate to make us who we are and how we lose these functions in brain diseases.With support from both the University of Sussex's Neuroscience Centre and the Sussex Genome Damage and Stability Centre, using cell models, my project, has employed a wide range of cell and molecular biology techniques to identify how amyloid beta and Tau may interact to prevent brain cells from functioning in a healthy manner.These findings recapitulate what happens in the different stages of the disease, indeed confirming the relevance of our findings.As a scientist, I cannot express how exciting it is to think about a problem in the laboratory, design experiments, and seek and find answers to these problems, in ways that are relevant to finding an end to the tyranny of diseases like Alzheimer's.As the most common cause of dementia, causing severe emotional, economic and healthcare burden, David Cameron has pledged more support for research into the disease and hopes for a cure by 2025.
Street Fighter 5's next DLC character Ibuki will be launched in the last week of JuneCapcom has finally opened up about the delayed release of Street Fighter 5's third DLC character Ibuki, which was set to release in May, issuing an apology over its lack of communication.Now into June, Ibuki has still not be released, sparking outrage among fans over Capcom's failure to inform players and provide an update about a new possible release date."We apologize to our players all over the globe for not communicating this change to our release schedule sooner.In May, CEO Kenzo Tsujimoto admitted that "some aspects of Street Fighter 5 needed more polish, such as the lack of content and server issues at launch".The blog post also mentions that the development team is currently looking into reports of input lag issues on the game's PS4 version and "will let you know as soon as they find out more".Capcom also adds that its latest solution has reduced rage quitting by about 60% and plans to continue rolling out measures to help curb the issue in the future as well.
Today, Microsoft tried to connect with college-age kids, and it did not go over particularly well.An after-party invite sent out to interns in San Francisco on Tuesday tried its best to be cool, like fresh straight from the fridge daddy-o cool.The end result was predictable.My roommate received this email from a Microsoft recruiter today.— Patrick Burtchaell @pburtchaell July 6, 2016For those of you who haven't yet been completely infantilized by the modern-day Neverland that is Silicon Valley, and thus may be confused by the above email's apparent use of English, fear not.
This undated photo shows the skeleton of an unnamed whale species.The whale's body was discovered in 2004 and the skeleton hangs in Unalaska High School, in Alaska's Aleutian IslandsANCHORAGE, Alaska – Genetic tests confirm that a mysterious, unnamed species of beaked whale only rarely seen alive by Japanese fishermen roams the northern Pacific Ocean, according to research published this week.Japanese researchers sampled three black beaked whales that washed up on the north coast of Hokkaido, the country's most northern island, and wrote about them in a 2013 paper.The challenge to confirm the existence of the new animal was finding enough specimens from a wider area for testing and matching genetic samples, said Phillip Morin, a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration research molecular biologist.Japanese fishermen reported occasionally seeing a smaller, black beaked whale that they called "karasu," the Japanese word for raven, or "kuru tsuchi," black Baird's beaked whale.
Big data is more important than ever in just about every scientific discipline — and the data is bigger than ever, too.To help manage that data and get it into the hands of scientists and students, the National Science Foundation is putting $35 million towards a pair of software institutes that will build the tools necessary for 21st-century research.The Molecular Sciences Software Institute will focus on — you guessed it — the molecular sciences.Research performed at this level of organization benefits greatly from computer models, but those models are limited in the number of factors, atoms, space, or time that can be simulated accurately.The plan is to improve the software and infrastructure used in the field, and share those resources with the rest of the world.The institute will enable computational scientists to tackle problems that are orders of magnitude larger and more complex than those currently within our grasp, Crawford said in the NSF s announcement.
It s all about advanced gene therapy and splicing – and it s bringing sci-fi ideas straight into reality.Here s a quick FAQ on the science behind CRISPR and why the world is paying such close attention.CRISPRs were first noticed way back in the 1980s when scientists were studying the genomes of archaea and bacteria.Even in such relatively simple genomes, biologists notably Francisco Mojica began to notice these odd sequences that seemed to repeat in a very specific way, with spaces in between.Molecular biologists were sure they had a unique purpose, and the prevailing theory soon became viral defense, which was finally proven in 2007 under the direction of Philippe Horvath.So it s just a DNA strand?
Microgravity does little to life's secret sauce, experiment confirmsKate Rubins and Jeff Williams checking spacesuits.DNA has been sequenced in space for the first time during a series of experiments performed last weekend by biologist-turned-NASA astronaut, Kate Rubins.Rubins joined Japanese astronaut Takuya Onishi and Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin on an adventure aboard the International Space Station in July.The team are expected to carry out more than 250 experiments over four months.Rubins, with her background in molecular biology, was responsible for sequencing DNA in space using MinION, a small handheld device the size of a chocolate bar.
I have noticed that lately when I boost a post on Facebook, using the US as my location, and refining my audience by interest or job title I'm pretty picky here , I'm still getting a lot of likes and clicks outside these parameters.My current ad has likes from India and Mexico.All of them based on their profile don't really fit the right interest molecular biology research instruments for this ad .I've based my audience on those interested in molecular biology, specific research applications, job titles such as laboratory manager, research assistant or principal investigators.So far I'm getting restaurant managers, retail managers, and unnamed people from outside the US.I know facebook has had issues with click farms, but this is insane.
Scientists given the really shitty job of researching genital warts for the betterment of mankind think they know where they came from.Or at least your great-great-great-times-one-million-grandad, as they believe that the current form of sex warts may have been first transmitted to humans due to sex between Neanderthals and early humans.According to Molecular Biology and Evolution, the Neanderthals and Denisovans that left Africa some 500,000 years ago were loaded with a variant of the human papillomavirus HPV that causes the warts, which was passed on to Homo sapiens after some heavy nights out on the fermented fruit.The researchers explain: "...the interbreeding events between Neanderthal and Denisovan populations with modern human ancestor populations lead to a host-switch through sexual transmission of the HPV16A virus lineage from archaic populations into the modern human ancestors.The HPV16A lineage, thus transmitted, expanded rapidly in the new host populations and became dominant in Eurasia and in the Americas."So it was a case of getting off with someone a bit rough and waking up to regret it.
Scientists given the really shitty job of researching genital warts for the betterment of mankind think they know where they came from.Or at least your great-great-great-times-one-million-grandad, as they believe that the current form of sex warts may have been first transmitted to humans due to sex between Neanderthals and early humans.According to Molecular Biology and Evolution, the Neanderthals and Denisovans that left Africa some 500,000 years ago were loaded with a variant of the human papillomavirus HPV that causes the warts, which was passed on to Homo sapiens after some heavy nights out on the fermented fruit.The researchers explain: "...the interbreeding events between Neanderthal and Denisovan populations with modern human ancestor populations lead to a host-switch through sexual transmission of the HPV16A virus lineage from archaic populations into the modern human ancestors.The HPV16A lineage, thus transmitted, expanded rapidly in the new host populations and became dominant in Eurasia and in the Americas."So it was a case of getting off with someone a bit rough and waking up to regret it.
The Theranos lab in San Francisco,IT ALL began with the best, if exceedingly ambitious, of intentions – to develop a machine that by a simple pinprick on a patient s finger could detect any disease known to man.But it ended in the most tragic of circumstances, with the firm behind the invention crashing and a British scientist who had devoted himself to the project taking his own life.Now his widow has spoken out about the treatment he suffered before and after his death at the age of 67, accusing his employers of heartlessness.Ian Gibbons, a Cambridge graduate, had been appointed head scientist at Theranos, a Silicon Valley bio-tech firm in Palo Alto, California, that had developed the one-prick diagnosis machine.The invention, pioneered by Elizabeth Holmes, a college drop-out who modelled herself on the Apple founder Steve Jobs, had helped to make her one of the richest women in America, with a net worth last year of $4.5 billion.
The International Space Station fills several roles for NASA—providing a toehold in outer space for human activity, testing closed-loop technologies for long-duration spaceflight, and developing international partnerships.But perhaps the station's biggest selling point is science.It was, after all, designated a national laboratory in 2005.Yet despite the vastly increased diversity of the astronaut corps since the early, macho days of the Mercury 7, many astronauts today are still fighter pilots, engineers, and surgeons.But Kate Rubins is, and she spent 115 days on the space station this summer and fall.Before becoming an astronaut, Rubins trained in molecular biology and led a laboratory of more than a dozen researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
While all of the major scientific and medical research societies have issued decrying President Trump's prohibiting travelers to the U.S. from seven Muslim-majority countries, the European Molecular Biology Organization EMBO has gone a step further.Late Wednesday, the 29-member state research entity launched its , a resource where U.S.-based scientists stranded abroad could connect with laboratories in their discipline and locality to continue their work temporarily."As you may imagine, we're all extremely worried about the ban anyway.I first heard that the Champlimaud Institute in Portugal had opened its doors to people who were stranded," said Dr. Leptin."Then colleagues started tweeting and sending emails about what they were doing, offering their labs as sanctuary or shelter."It seemed to me that one of the problems would be how does anybody find out that colleague X in lab Y was offering their bench, and how do they know who's looking for a bench.
For the first time, astronomers have used advanced algorithms taken from evolutionary biology and successfully applied them to make a phylogenetic family tree of 22 nearby stars.In a paper appearing in the journal The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the authors report that they have taken a page from the work of Charles Darwin in an effort to do stellar genealogy on a sampling of stars within our own galaxy.The authors write that they used the signatures of 17 chemical elements in 22 nearby solar twins as a proxy for stellar DNA.They applied a clustering technique that is widely used in molecular biology to construct an evolutionary tree from which three branches emerge.This offers a new way to search for common ancestors that can reveal the origin of solar neighborhood stars, the authors continue.They note that biological evolution is driven by adaptation and survival, while chemical evolution is driven by mechanisms that lead to the death and birth of stars .
Taking the right vitamins before travelling to a city with serious air pollution could protect your DNA from heritable damage caused by breathing in fine particles, a new study suggests.An international research team led by Dr Jia Zhong, from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York, found that a combination of three B vitamins – folic acid, B6 and B12 – could strengthen the self-defence mechanism of genome molecules, which are prone to mutate when exposed to high levels of PM2.5 (respirable suspended particles with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less), and help healthy adults offset the inflammatory and other symptoms of short-term exposure, especially if they came from an area low in pollution.“Ultimately, we aim to develop potential individualised intervention strategies that can be applied to mega cities such as Hong Kong and Beijing,” said Zhong, who earned a master of science degree in biochemistry and molecular biology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences before completing her doctorate at Harvard University’s school of public health last year.Leafy green vegetables and beans are rich in folic acid, B6 can be found in fish, beef liver and starchy vegetables, and B12 in fish, meat, eggs and milk.However, Zhong said, people constantly exposed to high levels of PM2.5, such as those living in heavily polluted cities, might benefit from taking supplements.“If not overdosing, B vitamins are usually considered safe for most people when taken by mouth.”
In a first, researchers have worked out a way to unravel and model the tangled, 3D structures of intact mammalian genomes from individual cells.The new method, published Monday in Nature, could help researchers study how the complex loops, twists, and bunches of a tightly packaged genome influence which bits of the blueprints are actively used by the cells, and when.How all that DNA is bundled affects whether important genes are available for decoding by cellular machinery, while others are boxed up and shoved aside until they’re needed.Such carefully orchestrated genetic activity affects everything a cell does—from carrying out basic functions, to allowing stem cells to differentiate into any type of cell, to triggering diseases.To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 videoThis live video has ended.
While AMD’s enticing Ryzen 7 processors battle Intel’s Extreme Edition chips for a fraction of the price, the AM4 motherboard platform is still in its infancy, as early adopters can attest.Ryzen motherboard BIOSes rely on the AMD Generic Encapsulated Software Architecture, and AMD’s Rob Hallock says AMD’s pushing an AGESA update to its motherboard partners soon.Its tweaks are expected to appear in AM4 motherboard BIOS updates in early April.Here’s what you’ll find in the update, verbatim from Hallock’s post:“We have reduced DRAM latency by approximately 6ns.We resolved a condition where an unusual FMA3 code sequence could cause a system hang.
p This robot fish is doing its part to make sure your seafood is contaminant-free.A robotic fish could soon be patrolling the waters near you, used to monitor water quality by checking pH levels to make sure they fall within normal levels.The polycarbonate and latex robot is the work of researchers from the Technical University of Madrid and the University of Florence.They hope that it can be used in fish farms, where it will play a valuable role in keeping aquaculture systems at an optimal level.“We designed a bio-inspired fish robot that is able to swim according to the directives sent in form of chemical messengers,” Giovanna Marrazza, an associate professor of Microbiology and Molecular Biology who worked on the project, told Digital Trends.“The concentration of hydrogen ions in the environment is detected by an electrochemical multi-sensor platform.
Phase shifters are special transformers that can automatically control the flow of power in a complex grid and can be a cost effective solution to optimize grid asset utilization.Transmission grid operators and planners are often tasked with reducing circuit overloads while maintaining grid stability and flexibility.The need for load flow management technologies such as phase shifters continues to grow as generation dispatch has become ever more fickle.In this webinar, you will learn more about:Why load flow management technologies are neededHow phase shifters automatically control the flow of power
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