Summary- A new market study, titled “Global Lab Automation Market – by Equipment and Software, Application, Type, End User, Region - Market Size, Demand Forecasts, Company Profiles, Industry Trends and Updates (2018 - 2025)” has been featured on Wiseguy ReportsLaboratory automation is a multi-disciplinary tactic to research, improve, optimize and capitalize on technologies in the laboratory that facilitate new and improved processes.The amount of automation that any lab requires depends on its workflow.The most broadly known application of laboratory automation technology is laboratory robotics.More usually, the field of laboratory automation comprises many different automated laboratory instruments, devices software algorithms, and methodologies used to allow, expedite and raise the efficiency and effectiveness of scientific research in laboratories.Demand ScenarioThe global laboratory automation market was USD 3.78 billion in 2018 and is estimated to reach USD 5.34 billion by 2025 at a CAGR of 5.06% during the forecast periodGrowth by RegionNorth America leads the market owing to the growing adoption of lab automation systems, execution of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010 and economy stimulus programs such as increased funds for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF), and rise in R activities by biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies.Also Read: https://www.medgadget.com/2020/01/lab-automation-market-2020-global-analysis-share-trends-application-analysis-and-forecast-to-2025.htmlDrivers and RestraintsThe key factors driving the market growth are process miniaturization, high demand for lab automation equipment in drug discovery and clinical diagnostics, higher reproducibility and accuracy, and large workforce demand and supply gap.Industry Trends and UpdatesThe automated workstations segment account for the largest market share in 2018 owing to the high demand for automation in liquid.On the basis of application, the genomics solutions segment is likely to grow at the highest CAGR due to the use of automation is on the rise in genomics for high-throughput requirements, providing greater reproducibility and output as compared to manual methods.FOR MORE DETAILS : https://www.wiseguyreports.com/reports/3920540-global-lab-automation-market-by-equipment-and-softwareAbout Us:Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Research Consultants Pvt.
(George Mason University) Kevin Moran, Assistant Professor, Computer Science, received $269,807 from the National Science Foundation for a collaborative project in which he and Denys Poshyvanyk, Professor of Computer Science at The College of William & Mary, are developing a holistic causal model for continuous software traceability.
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(George Mason University) Kevin Moran, Assistant Professor, Computer Science, received $124,445 from the National Science Foundation for a project in which he and five collaborators are studying computer bug-reporting management. The researchers are examining issues ranging from automated bug report quality to the design of a bug-reporting chatbot. Funding for this project began in October 2020 and will end in September 2024.
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(Northern Arizona University) Abolfazl Razi, an assistant professor in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems at Northern Arizona University, is working to make drones smarter and more autonomous. The director of NAU's Wireless Networking and Smart Health (WiNeSH) Lab, Razi has received a $480,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for his project titled, "Proactive Inverse Learning of Network Topology for Predictive Communication among Unmanned Vehicles."
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(University of Central Florida) University of Central Florida researchers are leading an interdisciplinary project to help communities in Central Florida use artificial intelligence and smart technologies to bounce back from disasters quickly. The project is funded by a recently announced $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation as part of its Smart and Connected Communities program.
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(Cornell University) The National Science Foundation has awarded the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) $32.6 million to build a High Magnetic Field (HMF) beamline, which will allow researchers to conduct precision X-ray studies of materials in persistent magnetic fields that exceed those available at any other synchrotron.
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(Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) On October 29, 2020 the National Science Foundation (NSF) approved a $53 million grant to a consortium of the country's top ocean-research institutions to build a global network of chemical and biological sensors that will monitor ocean health.
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(Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth) Dartmouth engineering professor Jifeng Liu has been named a fellow of The Optical Society (OSA).
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(Morgridge Institute for Research) Recognizing the University of Wisconsin-Madison's leadership role in research computing, the National Science Foundation announced this month that the Madison campus will be home to a five-year, $22.5 million initiative to advance high-throughput computing.
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(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science) The University of Miami's Institute for Data Science and Computing (IDSC) has joined FABRIC, the advanced U.S. cyberinfrastructure network funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), as a scientific partner. A three-year research award to UM was included in a $3 million NSF grant that will expand FABRIC to four leading scientific institutions in Asia and Europe, and support international research that benefits from real-time sharing of large-scale datasets.
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(University of Minnesota) In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications.
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(University of Arkansas) A $1.25 million grant from the Department of Defense will enable data science researcher Justin Zhan to develop novel algorithms to enhance the speed and efficiency of computational software that uses large amounts of streaming data.
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(American Institute of Physics) The American Institute of Physics and the American Physical Society announce Joel Lebowitz, director of the Center for Mathematical Sciences Research at Rutgers University, as the recipient of the 2021 Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics. The citation on the award reads: "for seminal contributions to nonequilibrium and equilibrium statistical mechanics, in particular, studies of large deviations in nonequilibrium steady states and rigorous analysis of Gibbs equilibrium ensembles."
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(Virginia Tech) Developing new technology for the virtual world: a full-body experience in a fully electronic environment.
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(Syracuse University) To help improve IoT infrastructure, Fanxin Kong, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Syracuse University, was awarded a grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) for research on "Internet of Things Design and Deployment of Scalable, Secure, and Smart Mission Critical IoT System."
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(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Today, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced a new 'Future of Manufacturing' grant of $499,955 awarded to a collaboration of Massachusetts organizations, which will help the region's manufacturers pivot their operations to address emerging crises.
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(Rochester Institute of Technology) Rochester Institute of Technology professors have received a National Science Foundation award to develop a hands-on data science course for non-computing majors. The course will first be offered at RIT and then across the country, in an effort to promote computing for all.
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(Michigan Technological University) Smart cruise control, better human decisions. Michigan Tech engineers study how cars and trucks move cooperatively on the road, respond to each other's environmental sensors and react as a group to lessen traffic jams and protect the humans inside.
(University of Texas at Arlington) Won Hwa Kim, an assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at Arlington, is using a two-year, $175,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to use machine learning for earlier detection of Alzheimer's disease.
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Imagine seeing yourself in a fake online photo or video. Cyber attackers are fooling people into believing what they see is true. Now, a University of Missouri researcher is helping design a computerized brain to detect these threats in real-time.
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