BuzzFeed announced Monday it is terminating a planned advertising deal with the Republican National Committee RNC because the Trump campaign "is directly opposed to the freedoms of our employees."Jonah Peretti, BuzzFeed CEO, wrote an email to employees on Monday morning to inform them of the decision.Peretti notes that Trump has said he wants to ban Muslims from entering the US, has "threatened to limit the free press," and has made "offensive" statements towards various other groups of people.Peretti writes:The Trump campaign is directly opposed to the freedoms of our employees in the United States and around the world and in some cases, such as his proposed ban on international travel for Muslims, would make it impossible for our employees to do their jobs.Peretti says that BuzzFeed doesn't need to agree with the positions or values of all its advertisers and that the decision "will have no influence" on how its editorial team covers the campaign.And while BuzzFeed never likes to turn away ad dollars, Peretti said in some cases the company has to make exceptions."We don't run cigarette ads because they are hazardous to our health, and we won't accept Trump ads for the same reason," Peretti signs off.BuzzFeed has a slightly different advertising model than most publications.Rather than simply running display ads that the brands create themselves, BuzzFeed's creative and video teams work with the advertiser to create original content, such as posts, quizzes, infographics, and videos.Presumably the issue wasn't just that BuzzFeed would be accepting money from the RNC, but that it would have to actually create the ads that promote the views the company opposes.BuzzFeed and the Trump campaign have already had skirmishes in the past.In March this year, Trump's campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, said he was considering taking legal action against BuzzFeed over an article that alleged he made unwanted sexual advances towards female journalists covering Trump, New York Magazine reported.Lewandowski said he told BuzzFeed the story was inaccurate but the journalist ran the story anyway.The RNC could not immediately be reached for comment about BuzzFeed pulling its ad deal.NOW WATCH: A global intelligence analyst explains why the real China is not the China we think ofLoading video...
Yahoo is using the spotlight of Cannes to highlight its new branded content studio, Storytellers.The program is a mix of all of the current buzzwords, from workshops to access to the editorial staff to influencer activations.Here's the recent branded content news.Yahoo touted recent success with a JetBlue branded content program.That campaign garnered over 3 million native video ad views, 31 million social media impressions, and a 27% engagement rate Yahoo Pepsi announced the creation of a 4,000-ft studio in which the global food and beverage brand planned to make branded content "from reality programs to online films."WSJ TheStreet announced its own content studio, Blue Chip, which former EIC Jeffrey Kanige will lead TheStreet In March, New York Magazine launched its content studio after hiring away Fusion's Justin Montanino
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has completely reinvented the way the Washington Post is run since buying the paper for $250 million in 2013.But the biggest change Bezos is bringing to the 140-year old paper may be in the way it's generating revenue: by selling software.According to a New York Magazine feature about the Washington Post on Tuesday, the Post is hoping to bring in $100 million in annual revenue by selling some of its software, including the content management system CMS used by its editorial staff to publish articles.Although it's still in its early days, with only about a dozen local papers using the CMS so far, the Post clearly sees the business of selling software as a potential new revenue source.It just recently launched a new digital advertising platform which speeds up load time, while it's also built an internal data analytics system that can track every little detail of reader behavior online, the New York Magazine wrote.Establishing this new source of revenue would be critical for the long term success of the paper.The Post is estimated to have generated $350 million in annual revenue, a significant drop from the $580 million in brought in in 2012, the report said.Bezos also plans to cut the paper's $500 million budget by half within the next three years, it said.We can t be an organization that loses gobs and gobs of money," Bezos told Shailesh Prakash, the Post's chief technology officer, the report said.Read the full New York Magazine story here.Disclosure: Jeff Bezos is an investor in Business Insider through his personal investment company Bezos Expeditions.NOW WATCH: How to use Facebook s awesome new 360-degree photo featureLoading video...
Barack Obama was terrorist fist-jabbing all over Iowa, and Sarah Palin was still a little-known Alaskan governor.Fox s new catchphrase was yet another of the network s nose-thumbings at the mainstream media.His initial slogan, Fair and Balanced, implied that every other news source was unfair, that whether you realized it or not your information was being hand-spun by pointy-headed coastal elites out to push a liberal-humanist agenda.Of course, Ailes never really meant it.Fox News was as aggressive a purveyor of a particular worldview as any other media outlet, one that happened to align quite nicely with the conservative wing of the Republican Party.As the indispensable Gabriel Sherman wrote in New York magazine, Ailes told a reporter back in 1968 that TV would replace political parties, and most of his career at Fox seemed dedicated to pursuing that goal.
Yahoo this morning is making a play for cord cutters with the launch of a new TV watching site called Yahoo View, featuring Hulu s free content.The site will now become one of the only ways to watch Hulu s TV shows and movies for free, as the company is planning to wind down its free version in favor of its subscription services – a plan that was already in the works ahead of the Yahoo partnership, Hulu says.Yahoo disclosure: Yahoo and TechCrunch are now both owned by Verizon and Hulu have had a long-standing relationship for years, which saw Yahoo acting as a distributor of Hulu content, but this particular deal has been in the works for around six months.And while Yahoo now has the status of preferred partner, it s not an exclusive distribution partner – Hulu content is also available through a number of other sources, including Comcast, and on websites that carry its player, like People.com, EW, New York Magazine, and others.On Yahoo View, users can watch the latest five episodes from their favorite shows from networks like ABC, NBC and FOX, eight days after their original broadcast.In total, there will be thousands of TV shows, anime, movies, Korean drama, British and Latino content, available, as well as clips and other behind-the-scenes interviews, as has always been on Hulu.
On Saturday, controversial Silicon Valley personality Shanley Kane went on a now partially-deleted tweet rant about the word daddy.she wrote in a now deleted tweet.It s a highly sexualized way of identifying a male authority figure, and there have been countless essays and think pieces written about the internet s relationship with the word daddy.Go through the comments and replies of any marginally famous man s social media and you ll find countless teens and probably adults too writing daddy, choke me daddy, and other similar sentiments.In June, I penned an essay about the word for New York magazine s short-lived men s blog, Beta Male, where I sum up how the meaning of the word has evolved:What daddy signifies in the 2010s is forever morphing and expanding, from parenthood to a way to express sexual deviance to sex work to gay slang to meme.
On Saturday, controversial Silicon Valley personality Shanley Kane went on a now partially-deleted tweet rant about the word daddy.she wrote in a now deleted tweet.It s a highly sexualized way of identifying a male authority figure, and there have been countless essays and think pieces written about the internet s relationship with the word daddy.Go through the comments and replies of any marginally famous man s social media and you ll find countless teens and probably adults too writing daddy, choke me daddy, and other similar sentiments.In June, I penned an essay about the word for New York magazine s short-lived men s blog, Beta Male, where I sum up how the meaning of the word has evolved:What daddy signifies in the 2010s is forever morphing and expanding, from parenthood to a way to express sexual deviance to sex work to gay slang to meme.
The rest of the staff and the rest of the brands—Gizmodo, Lifehacker, Jezebel, Kotaku, Jalopnik and Deadspin—are in the shelter of a Hispanic media company pursuing the broader multicultural and millennial audience.Writers like Richard Lawson, Caity Weaver, and Ashley Feinberg seemed to express themselves in an fresh but coded language new to professional media.When it became powerful enough to merit the New York magazine cover treatment, the package was called Gawker and The Age of Insolence, and illustrated with a keyboard of epithets popularized by the blog.TMZ, for instance, focuses its investigative energy on B-list celebrities; and is careful to maintain good relations with Hollywood lawyers and power players.They took on all subjects with equal vigor, often taking particular pride in undermining the behind-the-scenes players who had become accustomed to operating the celebrity machinery in anonymity.Tom Scocca s essay on Bill Cosby prompted a belated evaluation of sexual allegations against the sitcom star.
And once a year, the 450 best missile and bomb operators show off their skills at the Global Strike Challenge.It s all about dexterity and speed — from moving warheads by forklift to dropping bombs on specified targets.Photographer Andrew Hetherington got to see the expertise up close two years ago at the Whitman Air Force Base in Missouri on assignment for New York Magazine.He documented the two Whiteman weapons loading teams as they assembled, prepared, and loaded bombs onto aircraft.You re around something technologically stunning, that s also a death machine.Can You Spot the Snipers Hidden in These Photos?
If you weren t already aware, there are people in your company s IT department that can see all if they need to.Most of the time, they re busy with other things, but these four activities will likely put you under the microscope.Jake Swearingen at New York Magazine s Select/All spoke with a few system and network administrators to find out what will get a typical employee on their watch list.For the most part, IT departments will do very little active monitoring because it costs them time and effort that s best spent elsewhere.But there are a few things that will raise some eyebrows and draw attention:Low productivity output: If it looks like you re keeping busy, but always have very little to show for it, your boss may get IT to monitor your IM traffic, email traffic, and application activity.
Last week, Saturday Night Live introduced the world to yet another piece of deeply mediocre comedy that the world wide web has desperately tried to make into this year s hottest Halloween meme.His name is David S. Pumpkins and he is portrayed by legendary actor and Polar Express star Tom Hanks.Here s the premise of the sketch: two people Kate McKinnon and Beck Bennett go to a haunted elevator ride.He s just a random silly guy, slapping the asses of his two skeletons.They re not all going to be winners.Unfortunately, the majority of people online—as well as writers for this very website, New York Magazine, GQ, The Associated Press, and many more—don t seem to agree with me:
Document sharing service Scribd is expanding its subscription offering with the addition of premium magazine articles from Time, Fortune, Money, Bloomberg Businessweek, Entrepreneur, Foreign Policy, Newsweek, New York Magazine, The Atlantic, and others.The inclusion of these articles supplements the company s existing content, including both audio and traditional books and, of course, documents.For $8.99 per month, users are able to get their fill of content and stories from multiple sources, with content rivaling that of Flipboard, Apple News, and even Amazon, to a certain degree.Scribd s goal is to provide interesting reading to educated professionals through a model similar to what Netflix has done with subscription video, explained chief executive Trip Adler.Through its app, the company provides access to articles that would ordinarily be featured only in the printed version of the magazines.While some will be newsy real-time pieces, Scribd is turning to longer form and even less time-sensitive articles as it seeks to differentiate itself from the news apps that have flooded the marketplace.We ve always envisioned Scribd to be the reading destination that connects readers to the best written work, and magazine articles have been one of our most-requested features, Adler said.By connecting books, audio books, documents, and now articles, around areas of interest, our members are now free to skim what s trending or dive deep into any subject.
Scribd, the document-sharing site turned ebook and audiobook subscription service, is now offering magazines to subscribers alongside their current ebook library.For $8.99 a month, Scribd users will have access to a selection of choice magazines, including Time, Bloomberg, Fortune, People, New York Magazine, and a few others.That s in addition to the standard Scribd ebook offerings, of course.They ll be adding more magazines in the coming weeks.Hulu s upcoming live TV service will include ABC, Disney, ESPN, and Fox.Whether they can get NBC and CBS is still up in the air, but they also have deal with Time Warner which owns CNN and TBS among other channels .
Throughout this year s presidential campaign, journalists have focused, correctly, on the power of Facebook to shape, distort, and ultimately control the news and information that inform and educate voters.They ve written dozens of stories about the proliferating number of anonymous, low-rent websites that publish bombastic and clearly inaccurate stories designed to spread throughout Facebook s platform as quickly as possible.The most damning indictment came from New York magazine s Max Read, in an article titled Donald Trump Won Because of Facebook :It can be clarifying to identify the conditions that allowed access to the highest levels of the political system a man so far outside what was, until recently, the political mainstream that not a single former presidential candidate from his own party would endorse him.Pointing to false stories like Russia Asks CIA: Why Did Hillary Clinton Just Buy $137 Million Worth Of Illegal Arms?and WikiLeaks: Clintons Purchase $200 Million Maldives Estate, Read lays out the case that Facebook s flattening effect — the way it visually renders content to seem more or less the same — made it unusually difficult, though not impossible, for laypeople to distinguish between articles published by a week-old blog founded by a Macedonian teenager and those published by, say, The New York Times.
Throughout this year s presidential campaign, journalists have focused, correctly, on the power of Facebook to shape, distort, and ultimately control the news and information that inform and educate voters.They ve written dozens of stories about the proliferating number of anonymous, low-rent websites that publish bombastic and clearly inaccurate stories designed to spread throughout Facebook s platform as quickly as possible.The most damning indictment came from New York magazine s Max Read, in an article titled Donald Trump Won Because of Facebook :It can be clarifying to identify the conditions that allowed access to the highest levels of the political system a man so far outside what was, until recently, the political mainstream that not a single former presidential candidate from his own party would endorse him.Pointing to false stories like Russia Asks CIA: Why Did Hillary Clinton Just Buy $137 Million Worth Of Illegal Arms?and WikiLeaks: Clintons Purchase $200 Million Maldives Estate, Read lays out the case that Facebook s flattening effect — the way it visually renders content to seem more or less the same — made it unusually difficult, though not impossible, for laypeople to distinguish between articles published by a week-old blog founded by a Macedonian teenager and those published by, say, The New York Times.
the Brit Stakston, Foto: Lena Dahlström, license: CC-BY image is cropped .Both Google and Facebook tightens the conditions for the sites, which publishes fake news.In debate after the us elections has, among others, New York magazine argued that the false news spread on social media has impacted the election results.Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg responded to the criticism in a long post, where among other things, he wrote that 99 percent of what users see on Facebook is authentic, and that the social network has contributed to that two million americans registered to vote.She is not convinced that the responsibility to fix the problems with false news, shall lie solely with companies such as Google and Facebook.But at the same time, you don't want to give them more power to decide what will be published on their platforms.
A group of computer scientists and election lawyers are urging Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to challenge her election loss, saying they have evidence the results in three key battleground states were compromised.According to New York magazine s Gabriel Sherman, the activists say electronic voting systems in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania produced discrepancies that hurt Clinton.The academics presented findings showing that in Wisconsin, Clinton received 7 percent fewer votes in counties that relied on electronic-voting machines compared with counties that used optical scanners and paper ballots.Based on this statistical analysis, Clinton may have been denied as many as 30,000 votes; she lost Wisconsin by 27,000.Clinton needed to win all three states for an election victory.Wisconsin and Pennsylvania went for Donald Trump by the smallest margins of all the states that he won.
For a lot of people around the world and in the US, the result of this month s presidential election came as a surprise.But some academics, activists, and computer scientists insist that Trump didn t actually beat Hillary Clinton, and are asking for recounts or audits in three key states where they say the votes were manipulated by foreign hackers.New York Magazine reports that a group of computer scientists and election lawyers are urging Hilary Clinton s campaign to call for vote recounts in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania.The group says that the Democrat received 7 percent fewer votes in counties that relied on electronic voting machines compared to counties that used optical scanners and paper ballots, suggesting the possibility of a hack.While the group acknowledges that there is no conclusive evidence of hacking, it believes the pattern needs to be examined by an independent review.Meanwhile, The Guardian reports that a loose coalition of experts is preparing to deliver a report to congressional committee chairs and federal authorities next week that focuses on concerns over the results in the three states.
She s over 2 million popular votes ahead now, and some experts are suggesting that Hillary Clinton could be ahead in another metric, too.This week, a slew of computer scientists and election lawyers have called upon the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee to request a recount in three key states that were previously called for President-Elect Donald Trump.According to the team of researchers, which includes prominent names like voting-rights attorney John Bonifaz and director of the University of Michigan Center for Computer Security and Society J. Alex Halderman, there is persuasive evidence that results in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania may have been manipulated or hacked, New York Magazine reports.This is by no means the first time that concerns over hacking have emerged this election cycle.Before November 8, Trump himself constantly remarked on the rigged system, and in the weeks leading up to Election Day, reports surfaced that the voter registration systems of more than 20 states may have been hacked.However, to suggest that the results of the election may indeed have been affected by such activity is a novel development.
After an election marred by hacker intrusions that breached the Democratic National Committee and the email account of one of Hillary Clinton s top staffers, Americans are all too ready to believe that their actual votes have been hacked, too.But a statistical audit of electronic voting results in key states as a routine safeguard—not just an emergency measure—would be a surprisingly simple way to ease serious, lingering doubts about America s much-maligned electoral security.It ought to be a routine thing as much as a doctor washing his hands.On Wednesday, University of Michigan computer security researcher Alex Halderman published a blog post arguing that Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania should perform recounts due to risks that the election was hacked.The article followed a far more sensational report from New York Magazine the evening before stating that Halderman and a team of experts tried to persuade Clinton staffers to request that recount, citing a disparity in Clinton votes between counties that used fully electronic versus paper ballot voting.Some election statisticians and polling analysts quickly dismissed the disparity that alarmed Halderman, arguing that the lack of electronic votes for Clinton compared with paper ones was a misreading of other factors.
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