Image: Goldfinger, 1964 Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-center hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different—some say annoyingly loud—sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminum baseball bat—a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-centre hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different — some say annoyingly loud — sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminium baseball bat — a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-centre hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different — some say annoyingly loud — sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminium baseball bat — a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
Reuters – The ground-breaking detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time postulated by Albert Einstein 100 years ago, that was announced in February was no fluke.That long-ago violent collision set off reverberations through spacetime, a fusion of the concepts of time and three-dimensional space.These gravitational waves were observed by twin observatories in the United States late on Dec. 25, 2015 early on Dec. 26 GMT .The detectors are located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington.The first detection of gravitational waves was made in September and announced on Feb. 11.It created a scientific sensation and was a benchmark in physics and astronomy, transforming a quirky implication of Einstein s 1916 theory of gravity into the realm of observational astronomy.The waves detected in September and December both were triggered by the merger of black holes, which are regions so dense with matter that not even photons of light can escape the gravitational sinkholes they produce in space.The merging black holes that set space ringing in December were much smaller than the first pair, demonstrating the sensitivity of the recently upgraded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, facilities.We are starting to get a glimpse of the kind of new astrophysical information that can only come from gravitational-wave detectors, said Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher David Shoemaker.The black holes that triggered the newly detected gravitational waves were eight and 14 times more massive than the sun, respectively, before merging into a single, spinning black hole about 21 times more massive than the sun.Now that we are able to detect gravitational waves, they are going to be a phenomenal source of new information about our galaxy and an entirely new channel for discoveries about the universe, Pennsylvania State University astrophysicist Chad Hanna said.The research, presented at the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, will be published in the journal Physical Review Letters.
What if we told you that we could tell roughly how old you are based on your Instagram activity?A new algorithm from researchers at Pennsylvania State University apparently can do just that, and what it has shown about how the different generations use Instagram, and social media in general, is quite interesting.They use platforms like Instagram to show off their every emotion and mood.However, even though they seem to connect with more posts they statistically post less often than other users.This could be explained because they are more prone to delete posts they perceive as under-liked.Teens are very conscious about how much their posts are interacted with by others.
Scientists at Pennsylvania State University have developed a special coating that enables torn fabric to heal itself when subjected to water.The secret behind this bit of wizardry isn t glue or some other adhesive but rather, squid teeth.As Popular Science explains, scientists discovered that squid ring teeth – the tiny teeth found along the suction cups on a squid s tentacles – contain a protein that, when made into a liquid form using yeast and bacteria, can help fabrics like cotton and wool repair itself.All that s needed is a little bit of water and light pressure applied for about a minute.It s not a perfect mend as the seam lines are still visible but it s easy to envision how useful this could be in real-world applications.Penn State Professor Melik C. Demirel, who led the research, said there are a couple of different practical ways it could be used.
Who needs a sewing kit when you ve got a squid on hand?Proving once again that Mother Nature really does know best, scientists have discovered the self-healing properties of proteins found in squid ring teeth.But because we re not going to start killing squid in the name of fashion, scientists have developed a new bacteria and yeast solution, which has been shown to repair most fabrics.The liquid combination is very similar to the squid proteins, and using it is simple at least, according to video demonstrations by researchers at Pennsylvania State University .Simply place a few drops of the solution on a fabric rip, apply warm water, and press the torn edges together for around 60 seconds.From there, watch the material magically seam itself back up.
a new method Of clothes can be self-repairing.Researchers at Pennsylvania State University have developed a method that makes clothing it can repair themselves if they got a hole or a tear.the Fabric which may be of, for example, cotton or wool dipped in various liquids which provide a mikrometertjock polyelektrolytisk coating.It consists of positively and negatively charged polymers similar to the proteins found in bläckfiskarnas teeth which also have self-repairing properties, writes the university.When the prepared cloth and lagningslappen then put into water and are put under pressure melts tygbitarna together to form a strong joining, such as machine-washable.the Supply of lagningsvätskorna can be done after the fabric is broken.
In September 2015, a team led by Yale University astronomer Tabetha Boyajian announced that a star about 1,500 light-years from Earth called KIC 8462852 had dimmed oddly and dramatically several times over the past few years.These dimming events, which were detected by NASA's planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, were far too substantial to be caused by an orbiting planet, scientists said.13 Ways to Hunt Intelligent Alien Life Boyajian and her colleagues suggested that a cloud of fragmented comets or planetary building blocks might be responsible, but other researchers noted that the signal was also consistent with a possible "alien megastructure" — perhaps a giant swarm of energy-collecting solar panels known as a Dyson sphere.Astronomers around the world soon began studying Tabby's star with a variety of instruments, and reanalyzing old observations of the object, in an attempt to figure out what, exactly, is going on."I'd say we have no good explanation right now for what's going on with Tabby's star," Jason Wright, an astronomer at Pennsylvania State University, said earlier this month during a talk at the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence SETI Institute in Mountain View, California.
Analysis of 2,000-year-old human remains from several regions across the Italian peninsula has found 'overwhelming evidence' of malaria during the Roman Empire.Seeming to settle a long-standing debate about the disease's pervasiveness in this ancient civilisation, the research also opens up new questions about this parasite's potential role in its collapse.Using teeth from bodies buried in three Italian cemeteries, dating back to the Imperial period of the 1st to 3rd centuries Common Era, researchers from McMaster's Ancient DNA Centre found mitochondrial genomic evidence of malaria."Malaria was likely a significant historical pathogen that caused widespread death in ancient Rome," said evolutionary geneticist Hendrik Poinar.A serious and sometimes fatal infectious disease that is spread by infected mosquitoes, malaria and its parasite Plasmodium falciparum, is responsible for nearly 450,000 deaths every year, the majority of them children under the age of five."There is extensive written evidence describing fevers that sound like malaria in ancient Greece and Rome, but the specific malaria species responsible is unknown," added Stephanie Marciniak, a former post-doctoral student at the Ancient DNA Centre and now a postdoctoral scholar at Pennsylvania State University.
RALEIGH, N.C. AP -- The plunging cost of solar power is leading U.S. electric companies to capture more of the sun just when President Donald Trump is moving to boost coal and other fossil fuels.Solar power represents just about 1 percent of the electricity U.S. utilities generate today, but that could grow substantially as major electric utilities move into smaller-scale solar farming, a niche developed by local cooperatives and non-profits.It's both an opportunity and a defensive maneuver: Sunshine-capturing technology has become so cheap, so quickly, that utilities are moving to preserve their core business against competition from household solar panels.Brownson, a Pennsylvania State University professor who studies solar adoption."You either learn how to work with this new medium, solar energy, or you're going to face increasing conflicts."The transition away from coal-burning power plants now seems unstoppable, even if Trump scraps rules requiring utilities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
After a slew of rumours that surfaced over past few months, LG has finally unveiled its 2017 G series flagship, the G6 featuring a new display format at its media event on 26 February at the 2017 MWC in Barcelona.As has been already known, the LG 6 sports a 5.7in QHD FullVision display with an 18:9 screen ratio that LG claims would offer more viewing space and immersive experience when streaming video and playing games.If you are wondering whether it would be easy to hold the phone with such a huge screen, LG has got the answer for it.The G6, LG says, fits comfortably in one hand.It has received highest marks in all categories in tests conducted by an ergonomic research team led by Andris Freivalds at Pennsylvania State University and Ji Yong-gu at Yonsei University.The team tested the G6 for its stability.
Immuta debuts Projects for machine learning governance, 'interpretability is key' – CEOImmuta, a data governance startup in Maryland run by former US National Security Agency technicians, has developed a method to govern how data is used by machine learning algorithms.Dubbed "Projects," the new addition to Immuta's data governance platform embeds what the company considers "key GDPR [EU's General Data Protection Regulation] concepts, such as purpose-based restrictions and audits on data," which will allow data scientists to run complicated algorithms on data without breaching privacy laws.After announcing the conclusion of its Series A funding round back in February, pulling in $8m, Immuta's CEO Matthew Carroll has stressed that governance now requires data controllers to know "who is working on what and what the outcomes of that work are," as well as needing to "automate complex reporting – which is critical for GDPR compliance – that documents which data sources have been used, for which purposes, and by whom."Citing work by Nicolas Papernot – a Google PhD Fellow in Security at Pennsylvania State University who has worked on privacy within machine learning, especially regarding preventing bias and achieving higher accuracy in the output of algorithms – Immuta noted that the governance issue with non-interoperability CNNs (convolutional neural networks) is that the CNNs are "arbitrarily making decisions in a hidden layer.Speaking to The Register back in March, University College London's Dr Hannah Fry warned we needed to be wary of algorithms behind closed doors.
You can hop across the Pacific on floating patches of plastic.Now rewind to June 2017, when delegates from around the world met in Geneva for a United Nations-hosted summit to design AI for global good.The goal wasn’t just to develop friendly AI but to devise ways to use the technology to make the world better for everyone.Protecting our ocean by policing ourselvesIt’s easy for us land-dwellers to forget just how vital the oceans are.Researchers like Paul Johnson and Chris Marone, geophysicists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Pennsylvania State University respectively, have renewed interest in the potential for AI to predict earthquakes and they’re hoping it can help save lives.
With over 500 million tweets sent every single day, new research from the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) is investigating innovative ways to use that data to help communities respond during unexpected catastrophes.Their case study, "Embracing human noise as a resilience indicator" published in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure, demonstrates the ability of social media to alert first responders.Then, by isolating tweets with the terms "power," "outage," "electri," and "utility," the posts were organized by hour and compared to the outage reports in the same timeframe.The two data sets were found to have a moderate-to-strong correlation, and the team believes it's possible that Twitter was able to report power outages more quickly.Lalone is particularly interested in aiding first responders because his father and brother were both a firefighters and paramedics.Their efforts mirror a broader attempt by government officials to promote resiliency - a concept that has shifted in meaning after the events of 9/11.
An anonymous reader shares an article: Countless studies have shown that social-driven FOMO (fear of missing out) stems from a person's primitive desire to belong to a group, with each snap, tweet, or post a reminder of what separates you from them.This other type of FOMO, the all-news, all-the-time kind, is new enough that nobody has really studied it much, yet of the half-dozen experts in sociology, anthropology, economics, and neurology I spoke to, all quickly recognized what I was describing, and some even admitted to feeling it themselves."We scroll through our Twitter feeds, not seeking anything specific, just monitoring them so we don't miss out on anything important," says Shyam Sundar, a communications researcher at Pennsylvania State University.This impulse could stem from the chemical hits our brains receive with each news hit, but it could also derive from a primitive behavioral instinct -- surveillance gratification-seeking, or the urge that drove our cave-dwelling ancestors to poke their heads out and check for predators.In times of perceived crisis, our brains cry out for information to help us survive.Maybe this alarm stems from steady hits of @realDonaldTrump.
With increasing scientific and medical interest in communication with the nervous system, demand is growing for biomedical devices that can better record and stimulate the nervous system, as well as deliver drugs and biomolecules in precise dosages.Researchers with the University of Houston and Pennsylvania State University have reported a new fabrication technique for biocompatible neural devices that allow more precise tuning of the electrical performance of neural probes, along with improved properties for drug delivery."For years, scientists have been trying to interact with the nervous system, to diagnose Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors and other neural disorders and diseases earlier," said Mohammad Reza Abidian, associate professor of biomedical engineering at UH and lead author of a paper describing the fabrication technique in the journal Advanced Materials.Abidian said the new fabrication method allows researchers to precisely control the surface morphology of conducting polymer microcups, improving performance."We found that by varying the amount of electrical current and the length of deposition time of these conducting polymers, we can change the size, thickness and roughness, which is related to the electrical properties of the polymer," he said."We show that conducting polymer microcups can significantly improve the electrical performance of the bioelectrodes."
Researchers have caught their best glimpse yet into the origins of photosynthesis, one of nature’s most momentous innovations.By taking near-atomic, high-resolution X-ray images of proteins from primitive bacteria, investigators at Arizona State University and Pennsylvania State University have extrapolated what the earliest version of photosynthesis might have looked like nearly 3.5 billion years ago.To that end, they have turned their attention to existing organisms.By studying the molecular details of the reactions that green plants, algae and some bacteria use to photosynthesize, and by analyzing the evolutionary relationships among them, scientists are trying to piece together a cogent historical narrative for the process.In Search of a Common AncestorAt first, most scientists did not believe that all the reaction centers found in photosynthetic organisms today could possibly have a single common ancestor.
Do you ever find yourself reading through a scientific article and feeling like your brain is imploding as you try to wrap your head around some of its heavy-duty concepts?According to a new piece of research coming out of Pennsylvania State University, adult readers who spend a lot of time using electronic devices turn out to be less adept at understanding scientific texts.Compared to folks who read on paper (which, we believe, is a kind of high-res display made out of wood pulp), people who look at screens for hours each day — whether it’s reading articles, texting, or playing games — find that they pick up only short fragments of information, as opposed to incorporating the information in a more thorough manner.“Scientific reading is different from casual reading, and it requires the reader to put the science concepts together in a way different from putting stories and plots together,” Ping Li, professor of psychology and linguistics at Penn State, told Digital Trends.The researchers based their conclusions on studies involving hundreds of participants, recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk.Participants were asked to read eight different scientific articles, covering topics including electrical circuits, permutation, GPS, Mars, and supertankers.
We might sometimes talk about eating crap on a night in, but that’s nothing compared to the more literal crap future astronauts could well find themselves chowing down on.That’s thanks to researchers at Penn State University, who have been using a research grant from NASA to develop technology for breaking down solid and liquid waste, and transforming it into food that’s hygienic and safe for humans — albeit something you probably won’t be serving at a dinner party anytime soon.The resulting foodstuff is high in both protein and fat, and apparently not dissimilar to savory British sandwich spread, Marmite.“This is not the typical research direction for my laboratory, but among other things we do work with unusual microorganisms,” Christopher House, professor of geosciences at Penn State, told Digital Trends.“In 2009, NASA had a call for proposals for educational research projects that advance the topic of space colonization.Lisa Steinberg, who is an environmental engineer, and I proposed to that call the general concept here of coupling anaerobic digestion to microbial growth of non-pathogenic microbes.”
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