Travellers can stream a library of around 200 hours of content to their mobiles and tablets.A number of airlines have introduced similar systems in recent years as many passengers have better screens on their own devices than the traditional seat-back televisions, which add extra weight to aircraft.There is also a section for children, including Frozen, Peppa Pig, Ben 10 and Horrible Histories.Patrick McCall, co-chairman of Virgin Trains, said: The new Beam app will make our passengers journeys fly by, feeling like they ve arrived at their destinations before they know it.A spokeswoman for the train company said Beam would be available on all Virgin Pendolino services on the West Coast route and would be rolled out on the East Coast from Monday and Super Voyager West Coast services by September.The exact content will vary across the East and West Coast franchises.
Virgin Trains has decided to be all modern and on-trend by launching its own free, Netflix-like entertainment service, called Beam, which will inevitably make the ticket inspector's job a little more annoying "Excuse me, mind looking at me, reading my lips, hitting pause and rummaging around in your pockets for me?"Passengers on Virgin Pendolino services on both the West Coast and East Coast routes will be able to use the app to stream movies and TV shows as well as play games and read books while they travel, and the service should come to Super Voyager West Coast trains this September.Films:The Wolf Of Wall StreetBreakfast At Tiffany sBridesmaidsDespicable Me 2TV Shows:House Of CardsPoldarkFortitudeStuff For Kids:FrozenPeppa PigBen 10Horrible HistoriesBut what about data costs and mobile dead spots?There's no point in any of this if DiCaprio's mouth keeps freezing mid-way through testosterone-fuelled lad speech.Well, Virgin Trains says Beam works with an an-board server and doesn't rely on either a Wi-Fi connection or mobile data.Do make sure you use a pair of headphones though, especially in the Quiet Zone.
Virgin Trains has decided to be all modern and on-trend by launching its own free, Netflix-like entertainment service, called Beam, which will inevitably make the ticket inspector's job a little more annoying "Excuse me, mind looking at me, reading my lips, hitting pause and rummaging around in your pockets for me?"Passengers on Virgin Pendolino services on both the West Coast and East Coast routes will be able to use the app to stream movies and TV shows as well as play games and read books while they travel, and the service should come to Super Voyager West Coast trains this September.Films:The Wolf Of Wall StreetBreakfast At Tiffany sBridesmaidsDespicable Me 2TV Shows:House Of CardsPoldarkFortitudeStuff For Kids:FrozenPeppa PigBen 10Horrible HistoriesBut what about data costs and mobile dead spots?There's no point in any of this if DiCaprio's mouth keeps freezing mid-way through testosterone-fuelled lad speech.Well, Virgin Trains says Beam works with an an-board server and doesn't rely on either a Wi-Fi connection or mobile data.Do make sure you use a pair of headphones though, especially in the Quiet Zone.
If you follow your dreams, and film it, and put it on YouTube, there s a chance Richard D. James will see it and commission you to direct the first Aphex Twin video in 17 years.That s the lesson learned by young Ryan Wyer, of outer Dublin, who was not even close to being born when the seminal for Windowlicker came out in 1999.He even recorded the famous Aphex face hidden in the mathematically-named track on the Windowlicker single.I like Peppa Pig and the two-second banned videos, myself:Richard D. James is a prolific musician, but not since the glory days of Chris Cunningham has he released a video.Warp told me that James simply ran into Wyer s videos online and enjoyed them, so he commissioned the kid to do an official video.Be sure to subscribe to epic1:40d Gaming so you don t miss Wyer s next GTA V playthrough or drill & bass remix.
Entertainment One eOne , the Canadian film and TV firm behind children's franchise "Peppa Pig," has rejected a takeover bid from ITV valuing it at close to £1 billion $1.3 billion .The company, which is listed on the London Stock Exchange, issued a statement on Wednesday confirming that the board had unanimously rejected the bid because it
There s going to be that time when you hand it to a child so they can watch Peppa Pig for the 787th time, or your spouse wants to show friends vacation trips.After trying out several options, I landed on three good choices that might help you avoid some embarrassing moments or just give you peace of mind when the family is handing your phone around the table at the next family gathering.I was particularly impressed with Keepsafe.As you ll find with all of the apps in this genre, you use a PIN to gain access and provide an email address as a backup for a backup code if you re locked out.Once you ve gotten started, you can then start adding in content into the categories.You can upload files and videos to the different albums, with one devoted to a photos you want to keep private of a significant other ahem .
While voice recognition has made serious leaps and bounds over the past few years, it's still got a long way to go before it's fully secure.After all, what good is having unlocked virtual assistant if just about anyone can use it?It's a serious problem companies are starting to have to face.But now Amazon is actively working to ensure that Alexa (and thus, the Echo) can tell people apart just by listening to them speak.According to sources speaking to Time, Amazon has been working on something called 'Voice ID' since the summer of 2015.This would involve having Alexa compare the voice of the person giving commands with a pre-recorded voice sample.
Whether we’re trying to grab a few minutes of rest or need to make a deadline, the YouTube Kids app is a great way to ensure that our little ones stay entertained without worrying that they’ve tapped on something they shouldn’t.However, some possible upcoming changes to the app might make it even easier for parents to ensure their kids are sticking to Peppa Pig and Paw Patrol.In its customary APK Teardown, Android Police has spotted some interesting code strings that suggest Google may be developing a new Family Link app for remotely managing content in the YouTube Kids app.Currently, any content restrictions need to be made in the app itself, but this new feature will seemingly let parents manage their child’s search and content settings and block videos from their own device.That means if you’re at work and your child is with a babysitter, you’ll presumably be able to see what they’re watching and shut it down if you don’t think it’s appropriate.Additionally, Android Police has discovered a new icon of an animated video game controller.
Thousands of videos on YouTube look like versions of popular cartoons but contain disturbing and inappropriate content not suitable for children.If you're not paying much attention, it might look like an ordinary video featuring Peppa Pig, the cheeky porcine star of her own animated series.But soon after pressing play on this particular YouTube clip, the plot turns dark.Parent and journalist Laura June almost immediately noticed something was not quite right as her three-year-old daughter was watching it.In addition to Peppa Pig, there are similar videos featuring characters from the Disney movie Frozen, the Minions franchise, Doc McStuffins, Thomas the Tank Engine, and many more.However many, like the video Laura June's daughter saw, both contain disturbing content and can pass for the real cartoons, particularly when viewed by children.
My 18-month-old daughter uses YouTube for two things: Peppa Pig and that Imogen Heap song that was designed to be baby crack.I get it, I get it: free apps need to be ad-supported.So at first I thought this was just a move to bully me into paying for YouTube Red.In the evening, this exact same app, with the exact same settings, advertises video series that are exclusive to YouTube Red, including one with Minecraft mega-star DanTDM.On the weekends, it shows ads for movies.My daughter gets frustrated by the ads, because if she clicks on Peppa Pig she wants Peppa Pig, dammit.
A part of our childhoods has died with the news that Leo Baxendale, creator of the Bash St Kids and Minnie The Minx, has completed the last panel of his life.The news was broken by Beano artist Kev Sutherland on Facebook:You might not know Baxendale's name, but if you ever read British comics, you know his work.Baxendale was 86, and first discovered comics in the 1930s when "an older boy rushed up to me and shoved the first issue of the Beano into my hands."If you're less of an oldster than me, you might remember Minnie – real name Hermione Makepeace – from the animated 'toons.But personally I never got on board with them, because the Peppa Pig-like voice is all wrong for those of us who grew up voicing her speech bubbles in our own heads.
A part of our childhoods has died with the news that Leo Baxendale, creator of the Bash St Kids and Minnie The Minx, has completed the last panel of his life.The news was broken by Beano artist Kev Sutherland on Facebook:You might not know Baxendale's name, but if you ever read British comics, you know his work.Baxendale was 86, and first discovered comics in the 1930s when "an older boy rushed up to me and shoved the first issue of the Beano into my hands."If you're less of an oldster than me, you might remember Minnie – real name Hermione Makepeace – from the animated 'toons.But personally I never got on board with them, because the Peppa Pig-like voice is all wrong for those of us who grew up voicing her speech bubbles in our own heads.
Control of the TV remote is something that’s earned.But kiddywinks don’t understand that.All they see are buttons to press and the next thing you know those old episodes of The Sopranos you were working through are gone and all your TV’s menus are in Chinese.TalkTalk’s Kids TV Remote (£5, plus £5 a month) will put an end to that, locking your offspring into a sprog-friendly mode that means you can let them choose which episode of Paw Patrol or Peppa Pig they want to watch, without worrying that they might accidentally discover the more exotic channels at the bottom of the EPG.You can even hide the episodes they’ve already watched a hundred times to save your sanity.
An episode of the British animated kids' show "Peppa Pig" won't be shown any more in Australia because it presents spiders as creatures children can befriend, whereas Down Under, that isn't always true.In the episode, Peppa's brother George finds a spider in the family's sink."George wanted the spider to be his friend," the narrator cheerfully announces, showing the little brother and spider playing.Peppa proves herself to be a good potential Australian by screaming and running off."There's no need to be afraid, Peppa," scolds clueless Dad, in between snorts, "Spiders are very, very small, and they can't hurt you."But as a January 2017 survey of Australia's hospital admissions shows, that's not always true.
In order to lend strict verisimilitude to the product testing flow, I unboxed the Amazon Fire 7 Kids Edition when my toddler discovered the box sitting on my desk.My pink iPad?” filled the air, I faced a split-second decision: Hide it, explain that not everyone gets everything they want all the time, and deal with the nuclear fallout as the four-month-old screamed in sympathy and dinner burned on the stove?Or take the path of least resistance and hope that the arrival of food would distract her?I sliced the box open, plugged it in, logged in, popped the kid in a chair and ordered Alexa to “watch Peppa Pig”.A kid’s tablet has to be bomb-proof, it has to have easy controls for the kids (and for the parents), and it has to be able to summon child-friendly content in no fewer than six seconds.The Fire 7 Kid’s Edition meets those requirements, and it does so at the reasonable price of $100.
YouTube has been accused of “infrastructural violence” against children due to its role in the creation of vast quantities of low-quality, disturbing content aimed at pre-schoolers.James Bridle, a campaigning technology-focused artist and writer, documented the way the video platform’s algorithmic curation drives enormous amounts of viewers to content made purely to satisfy those algorithms as closely as possible.Bridle highlights videos with names such as “Peppa Pig Crying at the Dentist Doctor Pull Teeth!” – a pirate Peppa Pig episode in which “she is basically tortured, before turning into a series of Iron Man robots and performing the Learn Colours dance”– and “BURIED ALIVE Outdoor Playground Finger Family Song Nursery Rhymes Animation Education Learning Video”, which is an indescribable mixture of low-quality 3D models of Disney characters, violence, nursery rhymes and surrealism.He writes: “These videos, wherever they are made, however they come to be made, and whatever their conscious intention (ie to accumulate ad revenue) are feeding upon a system which was consciously intended to show videos to children for profit.“What we’re talking about is very young children, effectively from birth, being deliberately targeted with content which will traumatise and disturb them, via networks which are extremely vulnerable to exactly this form of abuse.”YouTube said in a statement that its main site is explicitly for users aged 13 and up.
Anyone who hasn’t checked out children’s media for a while is in for a shock.Most prominently, the digital diet of YouTube for children can appear strange and pointless.And tutorials in just about anything.Some of the anxiety adults feel about what children watch today is moral panic about social shifts: change is often unnerving, and we look for someone to blame, even if that means criticising children’s pleasures or parents’ supposedly lax standards.But children can survive and, indeed, thrive on narratives that adults find perplexingTo continue reading this premium article, register or login for free for unlimited access.
A New York Times piece and a subsequent Medium post this week highlighted an ongoing problem with YouTube Kids — bizarre and disturbing videos aimed at young children using key words and popular children’s characters.“Age-restricted content is automatically not allowed in YouTube Kids.” YouTube told the Verge, which was one of the first to report the story.However, YouTube said the change was not in direct response to recent coverage but that it had been formulating this new policy for a while.YouTube Kids launched in 2015 to bring children suitable content, but these sometimes gruesome videos portraying sex, drugs and violence have been sneaking their way in for some time.YouTube originally addressed the issue by allowing the algorithm to weed out much of the inappropriate content, but that clearly hasn’t been working.One recent example highlighted in the Medium post was of the cartoon character Peppa Pig drinking bleach.
YouTube has announced a clampdown on disturbing and inappropriate children’s videos, following accusations that the site enabled “infrastructural violence” through the long-run effects of its content recommendation system.The new policy, announced on Thursday evening, will see age restrictions apply on content featuring “inappropriate use of family entertainment characters” like unofficial videos depicting Peppa Pig “basically tortured” at the dentist.The company already had a policy that rendered such videos ineligible for advertising revenue, in the hope that doing would reduce the motivation to create them in the first place.“We’re in the process of implementing a new policy that age restricts this content in the YouTube main app when flagged.The YouTube team is made up of parents who are committed to improving our apps and getting this right.”Age-restricted videos can’t be seen by users who aren’t logged in, or by those who have entered their age as below 18 on both the site and the app.
YouTube is to restrict the availability of videos showing children's characters in violent or sexual scenes if they are reported by viewers.Last week, a blog post by writer James Bridle highlighted how YouTube was still being swamped by bizarre and indecent videos aimed at children.YouTube said its team was "made up of parents who are committed to improving our apps and getting this right".But critics say YouTube is not taking enough action by waiting for viewers to report inappropriate videos.The problem of video-makers using popular characters such as Peppa Pig in violent or sexual videos, to frighten children, has been widely reported.However, Mr Bridle's blog post went deeper into what he called the rabbit hole of children's content on YouTube.
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