Today we've gotten up close and personal with the newest innovation in E Ink display technology - Advanced Color ePaper.This ACeP solution is able to produce all eight primary colors using colored pigments only.What you're seeing here is a set of 20-inch displays created to show off the new technology at SID's Display Week this week in San Francisco."We expect ACeP to become the basis upon which another generation of EPD display products can be developed," said Frank Ko, Chairman of E Ink Holdings.We're crossing our fingers for ultra-low-power smartphones in the distant future.The folks at E Ink expect this technology to go into commercial production in the next two years.
E Ink, maker of the ePaper displays found in many e-readers maddening to have three different e prefixes in one sentence, but it s unavoidable , announced a brand new type of reflective display that can show a huge range of colors — but the tech is only going to be deployed as signage for now.Color reflective displays are nothing new, but none of the technologies touted over the years have been more than adequate.E Ink s Advanced Color ePaper produces 32,000 colors, and unlike some other electrophoretic displays, each pixel contains all the pigments necessary to make every color.That s a major engineering challenge: the pigments must effectively mix to form a blended color, but can t actually mix.Great for signage in stores, but at 150 pixels per inch, it wouldn t stand up to close inspection — say, as an e-reader.That said, early e-readers weren t so hot resolution-wise or in terms of contrast, and they ve come a great distance since.
But they aren t without their drawbacks, primarily in the area of color reproduction — e-ink displays on the market today have a limited gamut.Thanks to a new technique by E Ink Holdings, the Taiwan-based firm responsible for the Pebble Time s color e-ink display, among others, e-ink screens may soon sport the same wide range of hues as their alternatives.The experimental panels don t draw significantly more power than current-gen panels, for one, and they aren t any less legible, or prone to irksome reflections.Significantly, though, the ACeP uses a layer of fluid, carefully incorporated into the microcapsules that make up e-ink screens, that s capable of reproducing all the colored pigments — all eight primary colors, in other words — in every pixel.Don t hold your breath for a more colorful Kindle in the next few months or even years, though — E Ink s chief was rather vague about ACeP s near-term prospects.But the company s produced a 1,600 x 2,500 prototype — best suited for digital signage, it said in a press release — that it ll be showing during the 2016 SID Display Week in San Francisco.
Colourful Kindles could be on the cardsE Ink, the creator of the displays used on e-readers such as Amazon's Kindle, has developed what it's labelling as the world's first, full-colour electronic paper.The company's new Advanced Colour ePaper – or ACeP – is capable of producing to 32,000 colours using coloured pigments and could usher in a new generation of e-readers.Typically, coloured ePaper displays are produced by placing coloured filters over monochromatic displays, with resolution usually suffering as a result.E Ink claims that ACeP can show a full colour gamut using only coloured pigments, which includes all three primary colours – red, blue and yellow, in addition to purple, green and orange.So far, the company has produced 20-inch ACeP displays boasting 150 pixels per inch, but don't expect to see full-colour e-ink comic books any time soon: the initial target area for the technology will be digital signs for things like shops and advertising boards.For all the latest tech news, follow us on Twitter @IBTimesUKTech
Scientists have lived out every child s fantasy by accidentally creating a brand new colour and giving it a funny name.YInMn named after the elements it s made from -- Yttrium, Indium, Manganese may look like a pretty but unextraordinary shade of blue, but apparently it s rather special.It s been described as a near-perfect blue pigment , thanks to its crystal structure.The manganese ions in YInMn absorb red and green wavelengths of light but only reflect blue, which makes it extremely durable and vibrant.It won t fade when you mix it with oil or water.It s also free of toxins and reflects infrared light better than other blue pigments, making it an ideal material to keep buildings cool.
Scientists have lived out every child s fantasy by accidentally creating a brand new colour and giving it a funny name.YInMn named after the elements it s made from -- Yttrium, Indium, Manganese may look like a pretty but unextraordinary shade of blue, but apparently it s rather special.It s been described as a near-perfect blue pigment , thanks to its crystal structure.The manganese ions in YInMn absorb red and green wavelengths of light but only reflect blue, which makes it extremely durable and vibrant.It won t fade when you mix it with oil or water.It s also free of toxins and reflects infrared light better than other blue pigments, making it an ideal material to keep buildings cool.
As if we needed more evidence that cephalopods are on the verge of a global uprising that will end in humanity s destruction, our favorite tentacled invertebrates appear to have an insane visual system that allows them to perceive color despite being technically colorblind.The latest fascinating cephalopod insights come to us from a father/son team of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and Harvard University, who ve learned that weirdly-shaped pupils may allow cephalopods to distinguish colors differently from any other animals we know of.Boring animals like humans and birds see color using a combination of light-receptive cone cells, each of which contains pigments that are sensitive to a different part of the visual spectrum.And yet, many octopuses, squids and cuttlefish have color-changing skin that s used for elaborate camouflage ruses and courtship rituals.Instead of focusing light through a narrow pinhole like other animals, cameras, and telescopes, cephalopod pupils blow light out.Once light has been separated into its component wavelengths, cephalopods can use physical tricks—for instance changing the depth of the eyeball, or altering the distance between lens and retina—to focus different wavelengths of light on the retina individually.
As if we needed more evidence that cephalopods are on the verge of a global uprising that will end in humanity s destruction, our favourite tentacled invertebrates appear to have an insane visual system that allows them to perceive colour despite being technically colourblind.Boring animals like humans and birds see colour using a combination of light-receptive cone cells, each of which contains pigments that are sensitive to a different part of the visual spectrum.And yet, many octopuses, squids and cuttlefish have colour-changing skin that s used for elaborate camouflage ruses and courtship rituals.Clearly, these colourblind animals have become masters of colour manipulation.Image: Roy Caldwell, Klaus Stiefel, Alexander StubbsThey key may lie in those bizarre U-shaped, W-shaped, and dumbbell-shaped pupils, which act like prisms, scattering white light in all directions.
Around the same time, Moholy-Nagy tested the optical effect of plastics such as Rhodoid, Galalith and Trolit, and applied pigments with industrial equipment including a spray gun and airbrush.The spectacular results of these experiments are among the highlights of a new Guggenheim Museum retrospective that compellingly captures the remarkable achievements of a man who pioneered the adaptation of cutting-edge technology in art.The paintings were produced at a sign factory in Germany, based on directions he dictated to the foreman.By phoning in his paintings – and ordering one in three sizes, all on view at the Guggenheim – Moholy-Nagy simultaneously showed a Dadaist disdain for tradition and suggested how technology might give art a broader role in society.Photogram: 2016 Hattula Moholy-Nagy/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/Artists Rights Society ARS , New York; photo: Museum Associates/LACMAOther artists, including Man Ray, were also exploring this process, but Moholy-Nagy was the only one to see it as more than a novel photographic technique.
YInMn Blue Oregon State University .Scientists at Oregon State University have described their discovery of a vivid new blue pigment that doesn't fade.YInMn Blue, or MasBlue as it is known, was found while scientists were researching materials for electronics applications.The team was led by Mas Subramanian, a materials science professor at OSU.The foundations of the discovery were laid in 2009 when graduate student Andrew Smith was exploring the electronic properties of manganese oxide by heating it to approximately 2,000 degrees.A brilliant blue compound emerged from the furnace, which Subramanian immediately recognized as a research breakthrough.
Grants were awarded through Horizon 2020 -tutkimuspuiteohjelman the latest round of applications. The European Commission has allocated € 90 million in 65 innovative SMEs, says subsidies within the meaning of technology for European companies got five Finnish companies: Indoor Atlas, Paptic, Norsepower, FP-Pigments and Alleco. Oulu, Indoor Atlas receives more than EUR 2.2 million provided for positioning indoors and the development of local marketing application. Espoo Paptic may be slightly less than EUR 2.2 million, based on a new type of recycled wood fiber material development. bags made of materials can be used instead of plastic bags. The Helsinki Norsepower develop cargo ships complementary commercial power source, which take advantage of the wind.
For nearly a century, a hidden portrait has been slowly emerging beneath the brushstrokes of Edgar Degas' impressionist masterpiece Portrait of a Woman.Now researchers have finally been able to peer beneath the painting's surface and reveal the probable identity of the young woman in the portrait below.One of the study's authors, Dr Daryl Howard, told WIRED: "We started with a very bright X-ray beam and using X-ray optics we focussed it down to a relatively small size – roughly half the diameter of a human hair – and scanned the painting through that beam.""The X-ray beam excites the metals in the pigments of the painting.Different metals present in oil paints tend to each have a specific pigment – mercury is usually red, for example, while cobalt typically shows up as a blue colour.Using this information, the researchers were able to build an elemental map of the painting which revealed the colours underneath the paint which is only visible to the human eye.
Will the remote control still exist in the future?If MIT and Microsoft have their way then the answer would most definitely be no.The two have partnered together to create DuoSkin, a unique temporary tattoo that when attached directly to the skin, allows the user to control a range of connected devices.DuoSkin is made using gold metal leaf, which means that it s cheap, skin-friendly and can support a range of different input options.The finished product can be styled in a number of ways so it doesn t scream that you re wearing an advanced piece of wireless technology , and the applications can range from a simple on/off switch to even increasing/lowering the volume on a device.If you re fed up of losing your Oyster, then DuoSkin could potentially help in the future too.
When you submerge your hand in water for a while, your fingers begin to wrinkle.It's not an entirely settled question, but the current thinking is that it gives humans a better grip on wet objects.Jellyfish skin also wrinkles, but not in the presence of water or they'd be wrinkled their entire lives ."When they're scared, some types of jellyfish form a wrinkled surface that is opaque and warns off predators," said Songshan Zeng, who's working on developing new, wrinkled materials inspired by nature."That same surface is transparent when it's flat.""Our experimental materials use cracks, folds or wrinkles to mimic the surface engineering of skin," said Luyi Sun, heading the research.
Researchers from the university have created non-toxic 'edible' batteries with melanin pigments naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes.These ingestible batteries could be used to power devices that can be swallowed, while tiny robots could travel through the bloodstream to accurately target cancerous tumours.For decades, people have been envisioning that one day, we would have edible electronic devices to diagnose or treat disease," said study author Christopher Bettinger."But if you want to take a device every day, you have to think about toxicity issues.While scientists developed a battery-operated ingestible camera to take pictures of the digestive system 20 years ago, it s designed to pass through the body and be used infrequently to reduce risk of a toxic leak, while batteries powering pacemakers, for example, contain toxic components that are sequestered away from contact with the body.However, an ingestible and degradable non-toxic battery could make drug delivery devices in the form of pills possible, with minimal risk and discomfort for patients.
Imagine if we could be like plants, lying outside all day soaking up sweet, sweet energy from the sun.Doesn t sound like a bad life, does it?So why aren t the world s best minds figuring out how to hack photosynthesis into humans?It turns out there are a lot of reasons, which are spelled out in a new video by the American Chemical Society.First, there are aesthetics to consider: your cells would have to be packed with light-harvesting pigments called chlorophyll, meaning you d be bright green, or maybe a custom-tailored shade of red or blue.Although I m pretty sure you wouldn t have ivy sprouting out of your forehead.
Imagine if we could be like plants, lying outside all day soaking up sweet, sweet energy from the sun.Doesn t sound like a bad life, does it?So why aren t the world s best minds figuring out how to hack photosynthesis into humans?It turns out there are a lot of reasons, which are spelled out in a new video by the American Chemical Society.First, there are aesthetics to consider: your cells would have to be packed with light-harvesting pigments called chlorophyll, meaning you d be bright green, or maybe a custom-tailored shade of red or blue.Although I m pretty sure you wouldn t have ivy sprouting out of your forehead.
the State gas company Gasum flags are flying, when Finland's first, gasum's subsidiary Skangass operated by liquefied natural gas lng import terminal was opened on Monday the grindstone islet.at the Same time they started lng deliveries to customers of the former Kemira pigments factory, the current Huntsmanille, and the harjavalta Norilsk Nickel.Days later, the tickets do not liehu, but the minister of economic affairs, Olli Rehn, among its praises, how the Finnish gas market is now opened to full competition.the Balticconnector BC structure, along with the Estonian Elerengin with between Finland and Estonia gas pipeline, which is intended to come into use in 2019.Rehn satisfaction add, however, that all EU taxpayers involved in pipe costs.the Commission granted the project 187,5 million available – that is "free" money to Finland and Estonia.
Psittacosaurusen seems to have been effectively camouflaged to avoid detection by predators.Photo: Jakob Vinther / Bob NichollsSome of the dinosaurs escaped the predators thanks to a very efficient camouflage.It is clear from a new study where scientists managed to recreate färgmönstret of a dinosaur.the Species belonging to the genus Psittacosaurus, a small, bipedal herbivore with a body weight of approximately 20 kilograms who lived in northeast China for more than 120 million years ago.the Researchers, whose findings are presented in Current Biology, has examined the pigments of one of the copies and found out how the animal probably looked like in real life.
the Leaves are collected in Otaniemi, Espoo.The red, yellow and orange in the fall leaves is an untapped resource, according to Finnish researchers.Now tested whether the pigments from the leaves can be used in cosmetics and textilesThe Finnish word ruska means in the English translation about höstprakt and is used to describe when the Finnish forests change color in autumn.Now the Finnish research institute VTT, the Technical Research center of Finland, behind the attempt to see if the fall leaves can be used for more than to be magnificent.An area is to extract the dyes and use them in the cosmetic and textile industry.
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