Do you know about black magic?Do you want to cast black magic on someone?Do you want to know black magic spells?Do you want to take advantage of black magic?If you want to do any of these things, so that you want to solve all your problems in every possible way?Many people get trapped in many kinds of problems and from that they insist on getting rid of heel peak for themselves.But he is not able to solve his problem.To solve the problem, you should first get to the bottom of your problem, only then you will be able to overcome your problems by yourself, you can get your problem solved by Black Magic Specialist in Pune, Pandit Vishal Sharma.With black magic, you can bring anything, or human being, under your control.You can easily complete any of your work.When a problem occurs, its resolution is already fixed.
Therefore, here you will find such solutions that will help you in getting rid of the issue.Don’t worry if you don’t have any technical knowledge about setting up the emails it is not rocket science and only includes a few steps.And these steps we have mentioned below to sort out your problem.So let’s move forward and check out troubleshooting steps.https://sites.google.com/view/roadrunneremailproblemssolved/home
There are different solutions for your body problems and it clearly means that you are lucky enough, as if you don’t like anything about your body, here, you will have a solution to get that problem solved or corrected.Only, it is that you need to decide that how long you wish to silently deal with your problems or when you want to get your problems fixed and tale required action.One such problem that you might be facing is the spider vein which is also known as varicose veins.All you need to do is look for the vein clinic where you can find a professional as well as well experienced vein specialist to solve your problem.So, you should know that if you have swollen legs or blue veins and trouble in walking, so it means that you are suffering from the varicose vein problem.So, all you need to do is just look for a specialist of spider vein removal that can help you to get rid from the varicose problem.
In case a customer faces any issue with account-related problems.This problem may be like being unable to send or receive emails or like changing passwords.This number by Windstream Email Support fixes all this kind of problems.You can just dial this number and get your problem solved.https://www.windstreamemail-login.com/category/blog/
Sometimes Roku Remote not responding, you need help to get rid of this problem.In this article you will get steps to fix this issue.Restart Roku Device:Remove the power cord wait for 5 seconds.Re-connect the power cableGo to Settings > System > System restart > Restart.Pair the Device:Hold pairing button for 5 secCheck the pairing light on remoteReplace the batteriesWait for 20 sec untill remote pairedChange the Batteries:Open the battery compartment and eliminate the batteries from your remote.Re-insert the batteries.Wait for 20 sec untill connection established Replace the Remote:Buy a new remote if still your Roku remote not workingI hope you problem solved now, if not then call Roku experts..  
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: People have no patience for ads, faced with bombardment and retargeting online they're tuning out.  Solution: Marketers need to cut to the chase and, when possible, make consumers feel something in an extremely short window. Take it from Mars. Mars shares key findings from one of the largest, on-going neuroscience studies in the world. Here’s what you need to know: Marketers have two seconds to capture consumers' attention in the digital realm. The key is to draw attention and then create an emotional connection. The two together are the magic formula for triggering impulse purchases. Don’t trick your customers. Attention too often becomes the element tricking consumers into watching your ads. This will backfire. You need to strike at peak attention. Otherwise they will forget you.  Don’t forget the art. Science is great but it doesn’t create emotion. “You don't go to the store with gum on your shopping list,” explains Sorin Patilinet, global consumer marketing insights director at Mars. “We want to reach as many people as possible to build this memory structure, which will be triggered at the point of purchase, especially since half of our categories are mostly impulse buys like chocolate and gum.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: The traditional ways of doing business aren't working out for brand leaders. Solution: Put your employees first, your customer first and get into startup mode. Author and motivational speaker Simon Sinek taught us that organizations can only truly inspire if they “start with why”. Now he’s teaching us how leaders should behave in the age of Covid-19: Double down on ‘good leadership.’ “Why weren‘t you just calling your people at random and saying, ‘just checking in’. That‘s just good leadership.” Put the customer at the front of the equation, not yourself. “The companies that are really doing a good job at everything right now have put their customer at the center of the equation. They are saying, ‘we have really important, valuable things’.” It doesn't matter how mature your company or your industry is, you are a startup. “The companies that are struggling to pivot are trying to do what they’ve always done in this environment.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: Brands are increasingly bringing creative services in-house. Solution: Agencies must support a pivot towards internal talent with their own specialisms, the power of an outsider’s perspective and allure of the ‘big idea’. As in-housing gains momentum, challenges and opportunities are emerging for external agencies. We explore what they are and how agencies can make the most of this shift: The benefits of an in-house team: an intimate knowledge of the brand, faster output, more control and less cost – especially when it comes to production. The benefits of an external team: an outsider perspective rooted in culture, as well as skillsets that are often too expensive for a brand to build from scratch. And then, there’s the holy grail: ’the big idea’. Key elements for agency success include: being passionate about the brand, egoless, pushing the in-house agency to achieve excellence. Additionally, work to create smaller teams on both sides to avoid politics and don’t be afraid to swim out of your lane if you’ve got a great idea. “We are looking for really deep collaboration,” says Zachary Sheffield, Sheetz’s creative manager, who runs the company’s in-house agency. “We want an agency that challenges our assumptions, our points of view and comes to us with big strategy.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: As a mass market brand, Budweiser has seen mass market channels become more muted.  Solution: The brewer has concoted a plan to connected with younger consumers locally in a way they can’t miss. Bud is tapping into everyday moments to in an effort to get into 25- to 34-year-olds’ hearts, hands and refrigerators. Here’s the inside scoop on its new marketing blueprint: The brand has recognized that its sweet spot is “the intersection between something that has social currency within a sub-community and Budweiser having an authentic way of tapping in,” according to vice-president of marketing Monica Rustgi.   Tactical examples include: Michigan getting its very own Big Sean 25oz tallboy Budweiser in honor of the rapper’s new album, Detroit 2, and the brewer declaring itself ’the official beer of the shift change’ in Philadelphia on Labor Day. Bud also bought a free lunch for those who punched the clock during the national US holiday. On top of that, it is currently campaigning to become the ’official beer’ of Utah. “Consumers can smell run-of-the-mill marketing,” explains Rustgi. ”Even for a brand as large as Budweiser, we always want to make sure we’re right at the heart of consumers and authentically.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: B2B marketers were heavily dependent on events to explain their often expensive and complex products and services. In a pandemic, however, tried and tested methods just weren’t cutting it. Solution: Business marketers had to concoct plans to move from boring, methodical and rational strategies to ones that more entertaining, engaging and emotional. As tried-and-true B2B tactics become less effective, here’s some advice from businesses marketers who have made the leap on creating a new playbook amid Covid-19:  Don’t be afraid to play for laughs. B2B ads with humor or established brand characters are scoring in 2020, per research from the B2B Institute at LinkedIn. Dial up the UX or else. The expectations set in the consumer world for high-quality, frictionless digital CX have had a significant impact on B2B marketing. Feel good about leveraging empathy. Marketing that dials up human relevance and emotion have scored well for B2B brands – and will likely continue to do. “We must instead take a page from consumer brands, going a level deeper and taking the time to think about how we can develop a meaningful relationship at the right level with our customers as people,” says Carla Piñeyro Sublett, the chief marketer of equipment testing company NI. “Filling inboxes with unopened emails and throwing up banner ads only contributes to a go-to market strategy that is noisy.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: Having shored up early adopters, the popular plant-based meat brand is looking to dial up mainstream awareness next year. Solution: Turn up the volume with meat eaters through messaging about taste, nutrition and sustainability. A Super Bowl spot could be on the table as Impossible Foods looks to become a mass market product. Here’s how it plans to be provocative and pervasive in 2021: The brand will explore traditional advertising for the first-time, including TV. As well as this, its chief comms officer says it will embrace a lean-in agenda for PR when it comes to being called a “phony burger”, etc. It will also actively invest in methods such as in-store testing to see which message resonates with customers and where. The plant-based brand has plans to be provocative rather than offering “mushy in the middle messaging”. People want to be part of a movement, “to be a part of something bigger than themselves”, says chief comms officer Rachel Konrad. “We are torching the planet in order to put more cows on it to satisfy the demand for meat. That’s not sustainable.“ Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: At 12 years old, Unilever’s ‘Dirt is Good’ platform is a campaign with real endurance that has transcended continents and mediums. But the brand needed to update the slogan in line with its commitment to spending €1bn changing what it puts in its laundry and cleaning products, and to cut ingredients made from fossil fuels. Solution: Pivot the message from kids benefiting from getting dirty and instead make the campaign synonymous with one young protagonist doing “something heroic” and reaping the rewards of freedom and discovery. Persil’s evolution of ’Dirt is Good’ brought environmentalism to a tried and true campaign. Here’s how it done it: As part of its parent firm’s ‘Clean Future’ program, Persil bottles are now 100% recyclable and made with 50% recycled plastic. The brand is also looking to source 100% of the carbon in its cleaning and laundry product formulations from renewable or recycled sources by 2030. As well as making culls to its agency roster and mixing up the way it works with advertising networks, Unilever has been investing heavily in its own data to build out the muscles of its direct-to-consumer strategy and speed up product launches. For the ‘Real Change’ campaign, the brand is partnering with schools and NGOs over the next year to educate kids on how they can act for good when it comes to the environment. A key KPI will be how many children are reached. Unilever’s vice-president for home care marketing, Tati Lindenberg, says: “We somehow got stuck two generations back. When we look at the [popularity and impact] of someone like Greta Thunberg among young people, we can see that kids now want a voice and to contribute to the world and society in general.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: For years, Gap has struggled to stem the steady drip of falling sales as it comes to terms with an identity crisis.  Solution: A fresh chief marketing officer armed with a plan to refocus Gap as a personal style brand with a sense of individualism. Amid plummeting sales, Gap’s new chief marketing officer aimed to revive it as emblematic cultural brand. Here’s how it instigated the pivot: Gap announced a 10-year partnership with creative entrepreneur and rapper Kanye West and his distinctive fashion line, Yeezy, with the intention of creating a line of products appropriately named ‘Yeezy Gap’. It also leaned into its activist roots with its campaign ‘Stand United’ – a call for unity at a decisive moment in US history: the presidential elections. Beyond a limited-edition collection of voting merchandise, the campaign aims to amplify civic engagement through voter registration and includes a program of live talks with ‘When We All Vote Ambassadors’. In the development of its ‘Stand United’ campaign, Gap opted not to use an external creative agency, meaning that every aspect of its creation came from the marketing team. Gap’s new chief marketing officer, Mary Aldrete, says of the move: “We don’t need to rely on an outside ad agency. We create the concept, direct and produce all the assets ourselves, which is quite invigorating for the team because everyone is a maker.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: As the climate crisis goes higher up on the agenda, a proliferation of sustainability schemes and certification marks are encroaching on a space FairTrade led for 25-years. There are now more than 460 sustainability stickers on food and beverage packages, with a third of them created over the past 15 years. And sadly for FairTrade, large brands such as KitKat and Sainsburys have been moving away and in-housing certification themselves.  Solution: FairTrade designed a five-year plan that included a total brand refresh to reassert itself against competition. Its mission now is to make people aware of the full breadth and scale of the impact Fairtrade can create for vulnerable farmers and workers, beyond a mere transactional exchange. Aware it needed to fight to reclaim leadership, FairTrade turned to 2050 London and Humankind research, which helped it develop a positive, can-do narrative to open people’s eyes to the strength of the global Fairtrade community. Here’s its blueprint: FairTrade devised a five-year-plan that spelled out how it was going to make people aware that its brand is more than a mere transactional exchange, and remind shoppers of the value of an independent certification body.  Aligning itself with the conscious consumer in 2020, over the next five years it will endeavour to make people aware of the fact that a FairTrade system empowers crucial development in communities, including building resilience to disasters (climate change and the Covid-19 crisis), establishing its women‘s school of leadership and climate adaptation plans to protect rainforests and thousands of species of animals across the world. It has affirmed its position under a new line ‘choose the world you want’. It hopes the slogan will convey the power of a global community working towards a common goal. Acknowledging the move by multinationals to in-house certification, head of brand and marketing Laura van de Ven insists: “We‘re very supportive of the fact that these companies are putting attention to those at the bottom of the supply chain. But Fairtrade is an independent certification body, which is something that we pride ourselves on. It‘s not like marking your own homework. “We were the first in the market 25 years ago, so now we want to reclaim and solidify our leadership position.“  Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: After a tumultuous 2019, WeWork was supposed to turn things around this year. However, it hadn’t taken into account that its business model would essentially cease to exist throughout the first half of the year. So, how do you sell workspace when people are still being advised to stay at home?  Solution: WeWork used its time wisely, reflecting on what the future of work will look like in a post-pandemic world. Mapping out where new opportunities could lie, it recognised the accelerated demand for flexibility and a rise in companies looking to downsize their premises. Recognising the need to diversify its offering, WeWork has seen increased business from enterprises and from individual workers attracted by its subscription scheme. Here’s a closer look at its marketing turnaround:  Following guidance, WeWork worked hard making sure its premises are a space that is safe. It updated its comms to ensure it was reassuring its members and potential new members of the health and safety investments it made to its spaces. With companies looking to downsize their offices, it repositioned WeWork in the ground between working from home and returning to the traditional office environment. Enterprise companies now represent 48% of the total 612,000 WeWork memberships. It accounted for more than 50% of WeWork’s core revenue for the first time in Q2 2020, with large companies accounting for 65% of its new customers in June. Recognising an accelerated demand for flexibility, WeWork turned to subscriptions to drive growth. It has introduced its own subscription service called ’All Access’ that gives members entry to all of its 828 locations. It has also trialled an ’on demand’ option, which will afford non-members the ability to book workspace or conference rooms on an hourly or daily basis. WeWork’s newly-appointed chief marketing officer, Roger Solé, explains: ”We’ve been working hard on designing what we think the future of work is and we think that WeWork is more relevant than ever.  ”Our biggest business opportunity is with our biggest competitor... the traditional office space. We can actually help them reduce costs and, more importantly, offer a more flexible scheme. So our competition isn’t really a competition, it’s a transformation.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems.   Problem: In January 2020, the Women’s Sport Trust (WST) launched ‘Unlocked’ – a campaign backed by big brands such as Disney designed to amplify the achievements of women’s sport in the UK. Then lockdown happened, and put a pin in the organisation‘s best-laid plans. Solution: As stadiums around the world fell silent in March, the Women’s Sport Trust found a space to tell the unique stories of athletes from a wide range of backgrounds and use a Zoom-led community of sport stars and brand leaders to drive change and hone individuals’ social media skills.  After enjoying a bumper summer in 2019, campaigners cautioned that the cancellation of women’s leagues and tournaments this year would lead to even greater inactivity among girls and that a decade of progress will be lost thanks to an “invisible summer”. However, for WST, this wasn‘t an option.  Here‘s what you need to know: A five-month-long ‘Unlocked‘ initiative from the charity (announced at the start of this year) had planned to pair 40 elite athletes from 24 sports with leading figures from the world of business, sport and the media. Marketers from Disney, Sainsbury’s and Facebook signed up to be matched with sportswomen, including Rio Olympic hockey gold medallist Maddie Hinch; England and Manchester City goalkeeper Karen Bardsley; and Emily Defroand, a hockey player for Team England and Team GB. But just as things were getting started, lockdown put a pin into WST’s best-laid plans. Like their men’s counterparts, women’s games were halted, postponed or called off entirely. Vitality Netball superleague, cancelled. Women‘s Super League and Championship, cancelled. Women’s Champions League and the FA Cup, still to be concluded. Women’s Six Nations, paused. And, of course, Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, delayed. Amid this, WST spotted an empty space among the noise to start telling more diverse sporting stories, pitching out women athletes to national newspapers and educating sports fans. ‘Unlocked’ pivoted from its original form, with the programme’s athletes instead joining weekly Zoom meetings where they introduce themselves and support each other in boosting women‘s sport and developing storytelling skills to hone how they work with brands.  Zarah Al-Kudcy is head of commercial partnerships at Formula 1, as well as being a trustee at WST. Also a former marketer for the ICC Women’s World Cup and England Rugby, she argues that the charity-founded community will equip the athletes involved with the skills they need to work with brands and boost their profile. “In the various sports I’ve worked in, there are assumptions athletes know what to do with social media and how to work with brands. Sometimes they don’t want to ask, so this scheme has broken down some of those barriers.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems.   Problem: Periods, pain, and pregnancy – each of them something most women will be confronted with at some point in their lives, in one way or another. However, these topics are still very much taboo for brands and wider society, so how do we destigmatise then? Solution: ’Womb Stories’ by Bodyform – a strategic, beautifully-shot ad designed to shift the period paradigm with help from real women, animation and a series of stories woven together that got people talking.  Covering IVF treatment, endometriosis cramps, menopausal hot flushes, nipple hairs and first periods, Bodyform’s ’Womb Stories’ has given a voice to the unseen, unspoken and unknown truths about the physical experiences of women everywhere. Here’s what you need to know:  Bodyform asked AMV BBDO to build the campaign after it uncovered striking statistics about women’s intimate experiences. 62% of people agreed that women’s health wasn’t spoken about enough, while 40% of women said their mental wellbeing had been impacted as a result of not being able to openly share experiences around issues including miscarriage, fertility and periods. Though the creative team wanted to continue pushing back shame and engendering pride, it also wanted to encompass a reality that was largely ignored. And so, the result was to present the viewer with flame-engulfed apartment of a perimenopausal women; a monster ripping at an endometriosis sufferer’s uterus; a ‘flood gate’ moment following an unexpected sneeze; a woman who has chosen not to have children; and the often-turbulent journey of trying to conceive. The complex, sometimes dual nature of the womb and the mixed emotions it can stir for women at different stages in their life was the ’seed’ for the creative.  For its part, Bodyform wanted to start a movement with ‘Womb Stories’. It has been encouraging women to share their own experiences and wants to put the topic on the table for everyone to talk about, and it’s already created a buzz. Nadja Lossgott and Nicholas Hulley are the executive creative directors behind Bodyform’s latest work. Explaining the solution, Lossgott says: “It’s great that we got to the stage where we were celebrating periods and vulvas, but the truth of the matter is that, sometimes, being a woman – or a person who has a period – is pretty shit.“ She adds: “The complexities in the life of most women are complicated and messy, and that should be acknowledged,” she adds, pointing to issues like IVF, the choice not to bear children and the pain that comes with conditions such as endometriosis. “We started to think about anthropomorphising the uterus and the ‘womb dwellers’ that live inside it. The womb emerged as a kind of second seat of power that controls women’s bodies. It can be awesome, or the control centre can say ‘I’m going to totally screw up your life today’.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. And to set the tone, over the course of 24 hours our team of worldwide journalists will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when our industry demonstrated its remarkable talent for solving problems. Problem: Predicated by Covid-19, most major global markets are facing a downturn and consumer confidence has hit an all-time low. So, what practical steps should brands, and their agencies, take in the face of what might just be the deepest economic crisis in history? Solution: Marketers need to do less, better and use the data at their fingertips to inform a strategy that support consumers in a challenging time.  Analysts and experts to assess the practical steps the ad industry can take in a downturn – whether they're based in Singapore, Seattle or Southbank. Here’s what you need to know: Marketers need to remain calm and use the data at their fingertips to track (and respond to) changing consumer behaviour very closely. What they shouldn’t do is get caught in the trap of expecting consumer spend to remain moribund: if they do, they'll miss out on the falling cost of media and higher-than-normal engagement from customers stuck at home. Brands need to build a “priority matrix” that will allow them to rank their ad spend based on actions that are either strategically important, financially important or both.  This will make budgets work harder on the right brand activities.  Learning from past, and recent, recessions, businesses that innovate out of a recession by focusing on consumers will be the dominant brands of tomorrow. Tech investment needs to remain steady in line with this, with the experts arguing that this turbulent climate has accelerated the need for organisations to shift towards digital-first models. This must continue at a fast pace if they are to survive a double dip. Oscar Orozco, senior forecasting analyst at eMarketer, argues that history has repeatedly shown that brands who continue to sustain their marketing efforts through an economic downturn, yield higher ROI in the long-term. “Considering current economic woes are brought on by a global pandemic, we can expect the bounce-back to be even stronger than we have seen in the past. "With digital transformation accelerating across all verticals, marketers should shift budgets to performance marketing formats, and focus on mid and lower funnel campaigns and conversions. “Restrategising and concentrating on attribution will lead to a faster rebound when the economic situation normalises.” Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
To mark the launch of The Drum’s new manifesto – which introduces our editorial mission to help readers tackle the most pressing problems facing media and marketing right now – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com. Setting the tone for what you can expect from The Drum from here on out, throughout Tuesday our global team will be publishing a plethora of stories showcasing the creativity, ingenuity and adaptability of our industry at its finest. From our journalists in the US, UK, India and Singapore, today you can enjoy: Problem Solved – 24 solutions in 24 hours On the hour every hour today, our editorial team will be spotlighting 24 recent examples of times when brands, agencies and media owners demonstrated their remarkable talent for solving problems. Read, for starters, the inside scoop on how KFC rejigged its suddenly problematic ‘Finger Lickin’ slogan during the pandemic. How do you solve a problem like… keeping remote staff inspired? In this new opinion series, we ask readers of The Drum from brands, agencies and everything in between, for their advice on real problems facing today’s marketing practitioners. First up, hear how Arianna Huffington and top marketers from General Mills, Impossible Foods and Dr Martens are keeping distant staff inspired. 3 Actionable Insights… Michael Kassan, the founder, chairman and chief exec of Medialink, is both an industry fixture and fixer – as well as a connector and confidant to top executives. Today, he shares his thoughts about how brands and agencies can plan for success. Read his top three recommendations. A pocket guide to better social media marketing Social media managers are often the first responders when a company finds itself in trouble. So who better to ask than those very people – via social itself, of course – for their top tips on how to be better at social? These are the top tips social media managers think everyone should know. And that’s not all. Still to come today we have a video tour of the first specially-designed post-pandemic retailer, the inside story of how NHS England’s marketing beat the odds despite government budget cuts and our Drummers will take center stage presenting our manifesto. Stay tuned to thedrum.com for lots more throughout the day, and check out our letter from the editor-in-chief explaining our new editorial proposition in more depth if you haven’t already.
To mark the launch of our new manifesto – setting out The Drum’s editorial mission to help readers solve their problems – we’re christening today Solutions Day on thedrum.com.  As it’s our very own social media managers who are often on the front line of any trouble a brand might find itself in, we asked them what tips they could offer for problem-solving on social. Take a look below for some of the highlights: Don't rely solely on organic social. Know your audience / market and how to reach them effectively. — Tom (@TomGeeTweet) September 8, 2020 Don’t treat social media as a silo channel. Integrate it fully into your campaigns. — Neems (@heyneems) September 8, 2020   You can't please everyone, especially on the internet — Chadders. (@RosieChad) September 8, 2020 Respond. https://t.co/xeWBdfoohV — Cindy Gallop (@cindygallop) September 8, 2020 Don't post the wrong pic while mourning any celebrity death, we have been there. — ThePressRelease (@tpr_org) September 8, 2020 We work twice as hard as any other department because we have to educate other employees about what we do as well as execute social media strategies, campaigns, and create content. — Kat Lap (@StratKatka) September 8, 2020           Quality over quantity! — Alex Reay (@alexxreay) September 8, 2020 listen to your audience or they won't listen to you — Chelly Brown (@chllybrwn) September 8, 2020   Align your social media presence with your other forms of brand messaging - Keep your tone of voice consistent across all customer touch-points! — Proctor + Stevenson (@ProctorsBristol) September 8, 2020 Download the Headspace meditation app. — Cian Carroll (@CianByNature) September 8, 2020   Engage with people on the comments section. Study your audience through their opinions on your posts — Neha Neelam (@nehaaneelam) September 8, 2020 track everything you do, performance measurement and analysis is critical — Kavya Chakravarty (@kavyac88) September 8, 2020           To get the most value from social media, you need to have a relationship with all other departments in your organisation. — Emma Gascoigne (@emmajgascoigne) September 8, 2020     good content is still the reason why people should care. — Carol C (@carolchan9394) September 9, 2020         NEVER underestimate how long it takes to craft a solid social media post. — Hannah Ruth (@HRHSocial) September 9, 2020       If in doubt, leave it out. Those distant alarm bells you’re hearing when you’re about to post are there for a reason. — The Emilia Group (@TheEmiliaGroup) September 10, 2020         Dont jump into every conversation. Sometimes it's important to know when not to engage — Rahul Agarwal (@rahul_agarwal93) September 8, 2020     Don’t post the same content across all your social channels. Each platform serves a specific objective, better to do one or two channels really well than spread yourself thin across all — س for سوسن (@sawsanicity) September 8, 2020         Read more Problem Solved articles in our Solutions Day hub.
More

Top