First, Gizmodo said that biased human curators hired by Facebook—not just automated algorithms—were deciding what news stories showed up as Trending Topics on the company s social network, before sprucing them up with fresh headlines and descriptions.And here s the key problem: prior to Gizmodo s piece, Facebook seemed to imply that Trending Topics was just a transparent looking glass into what was most popular on the social network.They make what you might think of as manual decisions, in part because today s algorithms are so flawed.That s worth remembering when you think about the Facebook Trending Topics.Otherwise, you fund a research project that may or may not meet human equivalence, and you don t have a product until it does.When it looked like Gizmodo s story was finally blowing over, Facebook got rid of its journalist news curators—then it promptly had to deal with the fake Megyn Kelly story.
Repeat after me: Tesla's Autopilot is not actually autonomous.Tesla's Autopilot is not actually autonomous.Now, someone go and repeat that to this DJ Klypso guy.A post shared by Klypso (@djklypso) on Oct 4, 2014 at 5:37pm PDTIn one of the dumbest things to happen this week (a pretty high bar, considering), Grammy-nominated music producer DJ Klypso was ticketed by the California Highway Patrol for filming himself on his phone with his feet hanging out of the driver's side window of the Tesla Model S that he was supposed to be driving.The officer cited him for operating a cell phone while driving and for driving at an unsafe speed for traffic conditions (he appears just to be creeping along in traffic in the video).
It's a billion-dollar question: Should we care that there's a GH59-09418A printed circuit board inside a Samsung smartphone?At US District Court in San Jose, California, the heart of Silicon Valley, Apple and Samsung are trying to persuade a jury to see smartphones in very different ways.An earlier trial in the seven-year case already determined that Samsung infringed three Apple design patents, which cover ornamental elements of a product, and two functional patents, which govern how a product works.Also at stake is whether design patents, which govern ornamental aspects of products, are powerful tools that can keep competitors at bay, or tools that're relatively limited in influence.Co-founder and former Chief Executive Steve Jobs vowed a duel to the death over what he saw as iPhone copying in phones powered by Google's Android operating system.Repeat after me: Article of manufacture
It's a billion-dollar question: Should we care that there's a GH59-09418A printed circuit board inside a Samsung smartphone?At US District Court in San Jose, California, the heart of Silicon Valley, Apple and Samsung are trying to persuade a jury to see smartphones in very different ways.An earlier trial in the seven-year case already determined that Samsung infringed three Apple design patents, which cover ornamental elements of a product, and two functional patents, which govern how a product works.Also at stake is whether design patents, which govern ornamental aspects of products, are powerful tools that can keep competitors at bay, or tools that're relatively limited in influence.Co-founder and former Chief Executive Steve Jobs vowed a duel to the death over what he saw as iPhone copying in phones powered by Google's Android operating system.Repeat after me: Article of manufacture
It's a billion-dollar question: Should we care that there's a GH59-09418A printed circuit board inside a Samsung smartphone?At US District Court in San Jose, California, the heart of Silicon Valley, Apple and Samsung are trying to persuade a jury to see smartphones in very different ways.An earlier trial in the seven-year case already determined that Samsung infringed three Apple design patents, which cover ornamental elements of a product, and two functional patents, which govern how a product works.Also at stake is whether design patents, which govern ornamental aspects of products, are powerful tools that can keep competitors at bay, or tools that're relatively limited in influence.Co-founder and former Chief Executive Steve Jobs vowed a duel to the death over what he saw as iPhone copying in phones powered by Google's Android operating system.Repeat after me: Article of manufacture
Repeat after me, better software costs less...Interview ThoughtWorks chief scientist Martin Fowler has written about the curious inverse relationship between quality and cost in the field of software development.The user cannot distinguish between good or bad internal design simply by observing the user interface or the features, he observed."Progress is rapid initially, but as time goes on it gets harder to add new features," he writes on his personal website."Even small changes require programmers to understand large areas of code, code that's difficult to understand.It follows that maintaining high quality both internally and externally enables increased productivity and lower cost, but this runs counter to the human instinct that high quality costs more.
The 5G party hasn’t startedA motley collection of devices and a small number of 5G mast deployments in a limited number of locations does not a universally available service make.[ Take this mobile device management course from PluralSight and learn how to secure devices in your company without degrading the user experience. ]This is why the most recent GSMA report predicts it will be 2025 before 5G accounts for 46% of global connections, up from a paltry 1% this year and a tiny 4% in 2020.Reading between the lines, it seems the mobile industry group is looking to Apple’s deployment of 5G modems inside its 2020 iPhones to help boost adoption.The GSMA predicts we'll see 80% population coverage in North America by 2021, which suggests service availability may scale up swiftly towards the end of 2020.
Repeat after me: spring has sprung!In any regular year, March is the month where we find ourselves saying “the worst of it is over” after winter. The nights are shortening with the promise of post nine-to-five daylight hours any time soon. Our shoulder un-hunch after weeks tightened against the cold. City streets have a scent again. It is, as Katherine May writes at the end of her book Wintering, “almost warm”.Nature unfurling itself feels even more welcome this year. Not that you need reminding, but lockdown rules begin to ease this month, with schools reopening in England on March 8 and some outdoor socialising allowed from March 29. We may have to wait a while yet for proper hugs, but here are seven things we plan on embracing this month that aren’t each other.  Looking out for... those darling budsEndless vistas of greyish-brown will be jolted into vibrant colour with sparky yellow (and purple) this month. The croci are already poking through the grass of lawns and parks, and the first daffodils won’t be long behind them.Spot the blooms when you look up, too. The National Trust has announced it wants to introduce a ‘blossom season’ to the UK – much like the one in Japan – “to help signal reflection and hope.”A ‘blossom circle’ will brighten up London’s Olympic Park, where 33 trees including cherry, plum, hawthorn and crab apple will represent each of the London boroughs. The scheme will also be extended throughout the UK.Numerous studies tell us that nature is crucial to mental health, so check out the Trust’s guide to blossom to watch out for and feel yourself blooming, too.Settling in for... some excellent TV and moviesBinged It’s A Sin already? There are some new TV must-watches this month, including the celebrity edition of The Circle, in which famous people will ‘catfish’ one another by pretending to be other famous people. Loose Women’s Kaye Adams and Nadia Sawalha are both set to ‘do’ Gemma Collins, while Drag Race UK’s Baga Chipz will take on cleaning icon, Kim Woodburn. How long can this cast of absolute huns keep each other fooled?Other things to circle in the TV mag of your mind include Celebrity Bake Off, which begins on March 9. Series six of Line of Duty finally has a launch date: March 21. Meanwhile movie wise, Netflix teen flick Moxie, about a gang of high school feminist activists, drops on the platform on March 3.Films buffs, also take note: LGBTQ film festival Flare, organised by the British Film Institute, takes place online this month. The line-up is released shortly and an online purchase gives the viewer four hours to watch the film at home. A series of free-to-watch short films will also be available on the BFI website.Thinking about... the beginning of the end of lockdownWe are still a way off 100% “unlockdown” (even if Boohoo are priming us to party on June 21), but there’s respite in knowing restrictions will finally begin to lift this month. As well as parents breathing a collective sigh of relief on March 8 when schools reopen, it’s also the day you can start socialising with one friend in the park without using exercise an an excuse.From March 29, households will be allowed to travel to meet one another. And things gets easier for friends closer to home, too. The rule of six comes back into force on the same day, meaning six separate people or more if limited to two households, can also mix outdoors while socially distanced.If in doubt about your path to freedom, check out the brilliant One Way Road To Beer counter, that takes you from a tinnie in the park with one friend, through the opening of pubs outdoors, then indoors, to beer everywhere with everyone. Supporting... International Women’s DayMarch 8 falls on a Monday in 2021 – tellingly, the same day kids go back to school – and this year’s theme is #ChooseToChallenge.We’ve lost count of the stories we’ve written and read about how much women have shouldered during this global pandemic, and how central they have been on the Covid frontline: in healthcare and science, at work and in the home, balancing it all at once.Online events are being held across the world that will no doubt discuss the juggle and struggle, as well as celebrating everyday heroism. The Southbank Centre’s Women of the World gathering is leading the way with its usual mix of talks, panels, workshops and performances – and it’s all online, of course. Follow the hashtag #IWD2021 to find out and follow all the latest happenings.Planning... for an amazing summerWith UK hospitality and travel getting back on its feet from mid-April, and festivals and other large-scale events given the cautious go ahead by government from June 21, we’re finally able to make some summer plans.Talk about putting the “tent” in tentative – but we’re excited. There’s clearly an appetite for life after lockdown, given the amount of UK festivals already selling out. So if you’re tiring of your park walks and TV binges this month, why not indulge in a little light (or heavy) diarising.The forecasted return of UK-wide travel from April means campsites and hotels are already taking provisional bookings. And yes, international travel is slated to begin again in May, but remember each step of easing is subject to review.In need of booking knowhow: we have a guide for that. In need of inspiration: here are some of HuffPost UK staffer’s favourite spots for a staycation.Celebrating... mums of all kinds.Mother’s Day on March 14 will still be online for most of us who don’t live with our parents, but think of it this way – it may be one of the last celebrations twe have to endure virtually. Even if you harbour a sense of impending Zoom (an idea this cartoonist nails well!), it’s nice there’s a day in the calendar to celebrate mums – plenty of whom are isolated and in need of a good cheering up.There will be many, of course, marking their first (or umpteenth) Mother’s Day without a parent – or paying tribute to chosen family instead. If that sounds like someone in your life, why not make sure they feel extra loved with a call, card or letterbox gift of their own.Preparing... our picnic gamePicnics united us all in the first lockdown, and while we have to wait until the end of March to picnic legally again, there’s joy in thinking ahead to their return.Looking for ways to up your picnic game? How about ordering a classic picnic hamper, some fancy cheeses (vegan cheeses aren’t so bad these days either) and a bright new rug to throw down? Related...These Pictures Of Spring Blossom Are The Weekend Vibe We NeedAll The New Original Films Coming To Netflix This MarchAre We There Yet? How To Book A Holiday After Lockdown19 Little But Life-Changing Things We'll Actually Be Able To Do This YearHow To 'Dream Big' Right Now, Even When It Feels ImpossibleHere's Why We Love Looking At Pictures Of The Sky So Much
The ebbs and flows of a global pandemic have touched every aspect of our lives in countless ways. Too much time has passed to expect things to just immediately be what they were.So, why would you expect to walk back into the gym or a fitness studio and do exactly what you were doing before? If you kept moving in other ways while the gym was closed — regular runs or walks, intense bike rides, or workouts with bare-bones at-home gym equipment — you likely maintained much of your fitness. Heck, you may have seen improvements in things like speed or endurance. (If you didn’t have the time or energy for exercise, that’s fine, too!) But if you haven’t been in the gym or a workout class for over a year, it’s pretty likely those things will feel harder when you start up again.The most important thing to keep in mind when you return is that it’s OK if you have to take a few steps backward. If your body is a little bit slower, weaker or less flexible than it was before, that’s nothing to freak out about. It’s normal! With a few perspective shifts, you can learn to take advantage of this restart, instead of beating yourself up over it.Repeat after me: It’s OK if your old gym routine feels harder now“Working out at a gym might feel harder because you will likely be doing different exercises and using different pieces of equipment than you were during the past year,” said Brit Guerin, a mental health counsellor, fitness professional and the owner of Current Wellness in Raleigh, North Carolina. “Your body will take some time to adjust to these new conditions so it’s important to ease in slowly.”If heavy strength training is your thing, don’t jump right back into the weights you were lifting before. “My running joke during Covid was that not many people were hitting deadlift PRs in their apartments,” said Kelvin Gary, a strength and conditioning specialist and the founder of Body Space Fitness in New York City. “Motor learning and regaining strength and coordination that you may have lost is step number one.” On your first few days back, start with much lighter weights at higher reps than you were using before. Focus on proper form, and build back your strength slowly. Check in with your body during and after workouts to see how it feels, then gradually start increasing the weight you lift.“If you are returning to a group fitness environment, it might feel more intense because people typically work out harder when they are around others,” Guerin said. If you’ve been doing at-home audio or video workouts all year but feel totally wiped out by your first in-studio class, this is likely why. “It’s important to find classes that strike a balance between motivating you, while also encouraging you to listen to your body so you don’t overdo it,” Guerin said. Your instructor should offer various modifications and scaled-down options for each move, and should never insist that you go harder or heavier.Take this opportunity to reassess what feels good for your bodyMany gym-goers shifted to other, less-equipment-dependent types of movement during the pandemic. The first question to ask yourself is: How did that feel? Just because you assumed you’d return to the gym when it was possible, doesn’t mean you have to go back. If your altered pandemic routine has been feeling great, just stick with it and skip the gym until further notice. If you’d rather head back to the gym, don’t lock yourself into your old workout routine just because it’s familiar. “Get curious about what types of movement would feel good to your body as it is today,” Guerin said. “Just because you were doing high intensity workouts months ago doesn’t mean you should pick up where you left off.” Find a less-intense version of tried-and-true workouts you love, or take the opportunity to try something totally different that sounds fun and realistic right now.Determined to get back to your pre-pandemic level of strength? It’s important to be realistic about your timeline. If you took a 15-month-plus break, “you’re not going to get all your strength back in three weeks,” Gary said. If you’re doing heavy weightlifting, it’s also important to go in with a plan for how often you’ll work out and how you’ll progressively increase your load. “You can make a lot of gains in a relatively short time, but you need to have a plan and be consistent,” Gary added.Remember there are upsides to taking long breaks from exerciseIt can be frustrating to struggle through something that used to feel easy, but there are some positives associated with a long break from gruelling exercise. Guerin explained that the combination of intense workouts and high levels of everyday stress can take a toll on your central nervous system because you’re spending a lot of time in fight-or-flight mode. Stepping away from those workouts for a while allows your central nervous system to better regulate itself, which improves your mental and physical health overall. Another upside of an extended break from the gym is that it gave your body time to heal from past injuries, Gary said. Maybe you had a bad knee that you were ignoring, or a past shoulder injury that never quite felt right again. Taking time off from heavy lifting and intense, structured exercise was probably a good thing. Just don’t go too hard when you first get back, or you might cause even more damage.Go easy on yourself, mentally and physicallyWhen it comes to getting into the right mindset, Guerin said it best: “Be kind to yourself.” You don’t have to jump right back into exercise just because it’s accessible. If you’re only going to the gym because you feel like you should or because you feel guilty, you probably won’t enjoy it, which means you’re unlikely to be consistent. Instead, think of your return to the gym as a chance to move your body in a way that feels good, and remind yourself that you can stop at any point.Related...The Risk Of Heading To Gyms And Fitness Classes Right Now12 Mistakes Brits Always Make During A HeatwaveWhy The 'Dry Scooping' Trend Is Never A Good Idea
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