The DJI RoboMaster S1 looks like an autonomous sentry ready to protect the smart home of the future, and maybe someday it will be.Made to see, feel and hear the world around it, the S1 has 31 sensors to map its environment, which is more than what you'll find in one of the company's drones.Combined with its first-person view (FPV) camera, the rover can be programmed to do things like respond in different ways to claps or hand gestures or recognize and react to other S1 units among other thingsThe S1 is also a big RC car with a cannon that shoots squishy little gel beads and is just a lot of fun to race and do battle with other S1s.Named for DJI's annual RoboMaster robotics competition, the S1 (short for Step 1) comes disassembled into 46 parts, which DJI says can typically be assembled in about 2 to 4 hours.There are six 100-watt brushless servo motors for high speed and accuracy.
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Not content with dominating the drone market and even taking on action-cam specialist GoPro with its own box of tricks, DJI is now turning its attention to the world of educational robots with the RoboMaster S1.Launched on Tuesday, the modular RoboMaster S1 — short for Step 1 — is aimed primarily at children as a way to introduce them to artificial intelligence (A.I.), engineering, and robotics through coding and games.The blaster-toting, wheel-based bot is available now for $500, with its design drawing on much of the technology that DJI has already honed through its quadcopters and other products.Take, for example, its array of sensors — 31 in all — that help it to understand its surroundings, and the first-person view (FPV) camera that streams a real-time video feed to the RoboMaster app.The camera incorporates machine vision technology that helps the S1 to identify different objects, recognize and respond to sounds, and receive signals from other S1 units in the vicinity.
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DJI is perhaps best known for its drones but, at its core, it is a robotics company.It has dabbled in every aspect related to robotics, from computer vision to AI to mechanical engineering.drones), it has yet to tap one budding market in the robotics industry: education.That changes today with the introduction of the RoboMaster S1, the company’s first robot designed for entertainment and education.There is no shortage of consumer robots aimed at education but many of those have too many training wheels in both hardware and software.Some have only basic sensors and parts installed to simplify construction and cost.
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Everyone knows DJI for its drones and gimbals, but its newest device is a little more grounded.The $499 RoboMaster S1 is a tank-like remote control rover packed a wealth of movement options, a dextrous gimbal, a variety of sensors, and a blaster that shoots gel beads.Core to the S1 are its Mecanum wheels, a design that allows a robot to move in any direction, including strafing side to side.The S1 is able to stop on a dime and move back, forth, left, and right over uneven terrain with ease.Riding the wheels is a gimbal equipped with both infrared and gel bead blasters that basically allow you to play a remote-controlled version of laser tag or paintball.This is all controlled via a mobile app, which taps into the S1’s camera and allows you to do anything from play battle and racing games (more on this in a bit), to programming the robot to perform a variety of tasks.
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Dronemaker DJI has spent the last few years running a massive robotics competition in China called RoboMasters, where students build and code robots that do battle in a literal arena.Now, DJI wants to sell a more approachable version of that idea to kids in the US, Europe, and Japan, with an educational toy robot tank called the RoboMaster S1.Available starting Wednesday for $499, the S1 can be driven using a mobile app, or coded to move on its own.It’s equipped with 31 sensors that help it map its environment, and it can move in 360 degrees thanks to cleverly-designed wheels.Much like DJI’s newest drones, the S1 can recognize and respond to gestures and sounds, or track objects, all using computer vision.The S1 was impressive during a short press briefing.
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The DJI RoboMaster S1 looks like an autonomous sentry ready to protect the smart home of the future, and maybe someday it will be.Made to see, feel and hear the world around it, the S1 has 31 sensors to map its environment, which is more than what you'll find in one of the company's drones.Combined with its first-person view (FPV) camera, the rover can be programmed to do things like respond in different ways to claps or hand gestures or recognize and react to other S1 units among other thingsThe S1 is also a big RC car with a cannon that shoots squishy little gel beads and is just a lot of fun to race and do battle with other S1s.Named for DJI's annual RoboMaster robotics competition, the S1 (short for Step 1) comes disassembled into 46 parts, which DJI says can typically be assembled in about 2 to 4 hours.There are six 100-watt brushless servo motors for high speed and accuracy.
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The DJI RoboMaster S1 rover looks like a miniature tank, but acts like a clever Trojan horse for kids – it's a way to make education a little more fun.It's the first ground-based DJI drone built by the company behind the DJI Mavic Air, a popular flying drone that got our recommended award in 2018.The new tank-like robot has rugged all-terrain style wheels, armor for competitions, and a gimbal-mounted turret.These are the best dronesThe RoboMaster S1 features brushless motors with Mecanum wheels, allowing the rover to move in all directions.Users are able to assemble the RoboMaster S1 per instructions or with custom hardware using Pulse Width Modulation control ports.
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DJI, which was founded over a decade ago by Hong Kong University of Science and Technology enrollee Frank Wang, is perhaps best known for drones like the Mavic Pro and Air, the Ronin S, the Matrice, and the Phantom 4.The Shenzhen, China-based company has an estimated 85% of the worldwide drone market, and while it prefers to keep shipment numbers close to the chest, DJI reportedly has more than $2 billion in sales across 100 countries and raised capital last year at a valuation of $15 billion.While semiautonomous quadcopters remain DJI’s bread and butter, the company has dipped its toes into complementary segments, like gimbal-stabilized camcorders (Osmo) and virtual reality heads-up displays (Goggles).The RoboMaster S1 (or Step 1) is a ground-bound rover, unlike most members of the extended DJI family, and it features brushless motors that drive four Mecanum wheels (each with 12 rollers) attached to an omnidirectional chassis.Sensors include six on its exterior casing and a first-person view (FPV) camera mounted on the top that livestreams footage to the companion RoboMaster app for smartphones.And for more sophisticated robotics enthusiasts who pick up an S1 when it goes on sale starting June 12, it fully supports programming languages such as Python and Scratch 3.0.
Teams of robots are being pitted against each other in the finals of the RoboMaster competition.The event has been organised by the Chinese drone-maker DJI and will culminate in Shenzhen on Sunday.The aim is to shine the spotlight on young engineering talent - and to entertain the crowds.
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