It came not from a petri dish, a beaker or an astronomical observatory, but from the vacuum tubes and diodes of a Royal McBee LGP-30.When visualized in a certain way, they seemed to prowl around a shape called a strange attractor.Scientists soon encountered other unpredictable natural systems that looked random even though they weren’t: the rings of Saturn, blooms of marine algae, Earth’s magnetic field, the number of salmon in a fishery.In the paper’s acknowledgments, Lorenz had written, “Special thanks are due to Miss Ellen Fetter for handling the many numerical computations.”“Jesus … who is Ellen Fetter?” Rothman recalls thinking at the time.She recalls being out at a party at three or four a.m., realizing that the LGP-30 wasn’t set to produce results by the next morning, and rushing over with a few friends to start it up.
On the show The Boys, a speedboat smashes into a cetacean and the humans emerge unscathed. Could this happen in real life?
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