The next generation of air travel just got a step closer, with the successful completion of a rocket test in the Australian desert that could one day lead to flights from London to Sydney taking as little as two hours.The test is part of a series of ten, run by a team comprised of US and Australian military scientists.At the Woomera Testing Range, they were able to send an experimental scramjet attached to a rocket booster to an altitude of 278 kilometres with a top speed of Mach 7.5 - more than seven times the speed of sound.That's far faster than the 'supersonic' Concorde aircraft ever achieved, and passes the threshold for 'hypersonic travel' instead - defined as travel at more than five times the speed of sound."The practical application of that is you could fly long distances over the Earth very, very quickly but also that it's very useful as an alternative to a rocket for putting satellites into space.""It is a game-changing technology... and could revolutionise global air travel, providing cost-effective access to space," Australia's chief scientist Alex Zelinsky said in a statement.
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Spraying the wheat crops with pesticide could be a thing of the past if EU gets current with scienceIn a rebuke to the EU, and environmental activists worldwide, the biggest scientific metastudy yet conducted of genetically modified foods concludes they re good for human health and the environment.The National Academics of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, an advisory body of scientists, finds no evidence of risks over conventional crops, and huge benefits in the shape of increased yields in poor countries, and healthier crops.More resilient GM foods reduce reliance on pesticides.Since then, it s merely tried to strangle them by heavy regulation, giving member states the right to impose their own obstacles in the shape of temporary bans so much for single market harmonisation .Paul Dacre s Frankenfoods campaign, and the media s promotion of work by the now discredited scientist Árpád Pusztai were instrumental in fuelling revulsion against GM crops.Greenpeace co-founder Patrick Moore now promotes vitamin A-fortified blindness-fighting Golden Rice, which Western NGOs are attempting to restrict in the countries that most need it.
A file picture of a prototype Chinese maglev train operating in a vacuum tube.Photo: SCMP PicturesChina s scientists are looking to develop military applications for experimental technology behind an ultra high-speed vacuum transport system, according to a researcher involved in one of the projects.It will use magnetic levitation, or maglev technology, to raise the vehicle above a track and reduce friction.A major drive for the research comes from military demand, Zhao said.Most Chinese researchers used maglev systems to lift the vehicle into the air to avoid physical contact with the rail, which would generate enormous friction and heat at high speed.The maglev approach is less popular in the US, according to Zhao.
It currently takes almost an entire day to fly from London to Sydney – and more than that if you count transfers and airport wait times.But that flight length could be cut dramatically to just two hours, after a successful rocket test took the world a tantalising step closer to hypersonic commercial travel today."It is a game-changing technology... and could revolutionise global air travel, providing cost-effective access to space," scientist Alex Zelinsky said in a statement.A series of 10 trials in total will be carried out, with some taking place at Norway's Andoya rocket range in addition to the Australian test centre.The next flight test, scheduled for 2017, will involve a scramjet, a supersonic combustion engine, using oxygen from the atmosphere as a fuel source, making it lighter than those that require fossil fuels.As well as potentially transporting goods and passengers over the Earth, a scramjet could be used to launch satellites, too.
You're probably giving away more than you thinkThe location stamps on just a handful of Twitter posts can help even low-tech stalkers find you, researchers found.The notion of online privacy has been greatly diminished in recent years, and just this week two new studies confirm what to many minds is already a dismal picture.First, a study reported on Monday by Stanford University found that smartphone metadata -- information about calls and text messages, such as time and length -- can reveal a surprising amount of personal detail.Based on frequent calls to a local firearms dealer that prominently advertises AR semiautomatic rifles and to the customer support hotline of a major manufacturer that produces them, it's logical to conclude that another likely owns such a weapon.Currently, U.S. law gives more privacy protections to call content and makes it easier for government agencies to obtain metadata, in part because policymakers assume that it shouldn t be possible to infer specific sensitive details about people based on metadata alone.Many people have this idea that only machine-learning techniques can discover interesting patterns in location data, and they feel secure that not everyone has the technical knowledge to do that, said Ilaria Liccardi, a research scientist at MIT s Internet Policy Research Initiative and first author on the paper.
The location stamps on just a handful of Twitter posts can help even low-tech stalkers find you, researchers found.The notion of online privacy has been greatly diminished in recent years, and just this week two new studies confirm what to many minds is already a dismal picture.First, a study reported on Monday by Stanford University found that smartphone metadata—information about calls and text messages, such as time and length—can reveal a surprising amount of personal detail.Based on frequent calls to a local firearms dealer that prominently advertises AR semiautomatic rifles and to the customer support hotline of a major manufacturer that produces them, it s logical to conclude that another likely owns such a weapon.Currently, U.S. law gives more privacy protections to call content and makes it easier for government agencies to obtain metadata, in part because policymakers assume that it shouldn t be possible to infer specific sensitive details about people based on metadata alone.Many people have this idea that only machine-learning techniques can discover interesting patterns in location data, and they feel secure that not everyone has the technical knowledge to do that, said Ilaria Liccardi, a research scientist at MIT s Internet Policy Research Initiative and first author on the paper.
Answer by Scott Aaronson, Theoretical computer scientist at MIT, soon to be at UT Austin, on Quora.There are things like Deflategate or manspreading or the dresses worn at the Oscars, which many people talk about but few should.And then there are things like World War II, global warming, black holes, or machine learning, which many people talk about and probably many should.Indeed, I started out in AI and machine learning, as an undergrad at Cornell with Bart Selman and then as a grad student at Berkeley with Mike Jordan, before shifting into quantum computing, where I felt like my comparative advantage was greater.On the other hand, at least according to the ML researchers I know, the recent progress has not involved any major new conceptual breakthroughs: it s been more about further refinement of algorithms that already existed in the 70s and 80s, and of course, implementing those algorithms on orders-of-magnitude faster computers and training them with orders-of-magnitude more data.In the end, I suppose it s less interesting to me to look at the sheer amount of machine learning hype than at its content.
May has been a big month for personal robotics.So keep tabs on your parents and grandparents: they could be cyborgs one day.The suit works a little like an image stabilizer in a camera.There are some actuators in the belt that detect shaky movements.The team even received $2.9 million in funding from DARPA, the US government's futuristic technology arm, to develop the suit so that soldiers on the field would suffer less from muscle cramps.The researchers hope eventually the suit will mimic natural skin to the point where you can pretty much slip it on before you put actual clothes on.In the video above, though, you'll see that the robotic suit is more in the middle of the road between being the clunky power-walking suits Hyundai made and actual clothes.In the past few years, engineers have been making strides toward building robotic walking suits that would give paralyzed patients the ability to move again.This obsession with restoring limb function has led to things like mind-controlled arms and printable hands, among many other life-changing advances in prosthetics.Soon enough, these people won't have to worry about looking like robots — it'll just be like putting on a second skin.Read the original article on Tech Insider.More from Tech Insider:Take a tour of London's new super-sleek train systemGoogle just released a new messaging app that lets you do much more than send messages GOOG There's a secret Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Airbnb in NYC you can rent for freeGoogle just announced its Amazon Echo competitorA war is brewing between brands and the social media 'influencers' they payNOW WATCH: A hair scientist debunks the biggest myth about shavingLoading video...
The discovery is classified as a breakthrough by several researchers who say that the new method could be used to encrypt data, secure electronic voting, making statistical surveys and better simulate complex systems such as the Earth's climate. The new method creates namely what is classified as true random numbers but with less work than previous methods, which could mean better security for everything from credit card transactions to military communications. Many services today often choose a weaker sequence of random numbers that are not true random because they want to keep down the processing power required. Computer scientist David Zuckerman and his assistant Eshan Chattopadhyay will present how the new approach nearer in June during the Symposium on Theory of Computing, which is the Association for Computing Machinery's main theoretical computer research conference. I am very pleased to have resolved it, said David Zuckerman. Simply described, it will take the new method, two story random sequences of numbers and turn them into a sequence of true random numbers.
The NHS Royal Free Trust said it plans to continue testing a kidney monitoring app developed by Google DeepMind, despite regulators moving in.The app, known as Streams, aims to help clinicians detect acute kidney injury AKI — a condition that kills more than 1,000 people a month.A Royal Free spokesman denied that trials with DeepMind had been suspended after TechCrunch reported the app was not currently being used."The UK s medicines and healthcare devices regulator, the MHRA, is in talks with Google DeepMind and the Royal Free about the app, according to TechCrunch."We have been in contact with Google since May 4 and are currently in discussions with them about whether or not their app needs to be registered as a device," a spokesman for the MHRA told TechCrunch.The Information Commissioners Office ICO is also investigating the partnership between the two organisations after receiving a small number of complaints from individuals.So far, the Royal Free has carried out three small "user tests" for the Streams app involving an unspecified number of patients.Each trial lasted between two and six days and involved up to six clinicians.DeepMind came under scrutiny after New Scientist revealed it had signed an extensive data-sharing agreement with the NHS Royal Free Trust to develop the Streams app.The agreement gives DeepMind access to 1.6 million medical records for patients across three London hospitals: Barnet, Chase Farm, and the Royal Free.Through the data-sharing agreement with the NHS, DeepMind will be able to see data that is unrelated to kidney function, including whether people are HIV-positive as well as details of drug overdoses and abortions.Privacy campaigners and healthcare professionals have questioned why DeepMind needs access to so much data to develop a relatively niche app.A board of healthcare experts and government tech leaders are due to scrutinise DeepMind's work with the NHS.
The discovery is classified as a breakthrough by several researchers who say that the new method could be used to encrypt data, secure electronic voting, making statistical surveys and better simulate complex systems such as the Earth's climate. The new method creates namely what is classified as true random numbers but with less work than previous methods, which could mean better security for everything from credit card transactions to military communications. Many services today often choose a weaker sequence of random numbers that are not true random because they want to keep down the processing power required. Computer scientist David Zuckerman and his assistant Eshan Chattopadhyay will present how the new approach nearer in June during the Symposium on Theory of Computing, which is the Association for Computing Machinery's main theoretical computer research conference. I am very pleased to have resolved it, said David Zuckerman. Simply described, it will take the new method, two story random sequences of numbers and turn them into a sequence of true random numbers.
Organic fragments extracted from host rock of the fossils show well-preserved cellular structure.Photo: AFPA fresh look at fossils of the oldest known complex life form, found near Beijing more than two decades ago, could rewrite the history of evolution, according to a new study led by Chinese scientists.They looked like seaweed and probably carried out photosynthesis, researchers said.Back then, volcanic eruptions, a toxic atmosphere and the near-absence of oxygen prevented life from evolving into large and sophisticated forms.If you look at blade-shaped organisms like this today, things that are leaf-like or seaweed-like ... almost everything that has that shape is photosynthetic, so this suggests that photosynthesis came to the eukaryotes fairly early in their history as well.But not all scientists agreed.
File photo - Bottles of French wine are displayed at the Chateau Bouscaut in Cadaujac, southwestern France, during the start of a week of wine tasting at the chateaux in the Bordeaux region April 4, 2016."We can turn water into wine in 15 minutes," New Scientist quotes as saying Ava Winery.He spent a weekend toying with 15 combinations of ethanol, tannin powder, flavor compounds, and more.The initial results were "monstrous," with one attempt resembling "melted butter."But six months later, Ava Winery had a synthetic replication of an Italian Moscato d'Asti.The big secret here is that most compounds in wine have no perceptible impact on the flavor or the aroma, Lee tells New Scientist.
Road User Protection, Tesla capital and robotics researchers. Google is working since long with self-driving cars will be safer than human drivers. If an accident does occur, the company has now patented a technique where a hit person detained on the car, read more about the "human flugpappret" on Io9. Apple is investing heavily in India and will recruit 4,000 developers to its office in Hyderabad, it writes The Next Web. Tesla is gearing up to bring in new capital to fund the production of new Model 3, read more on Techchrunch. Robot scientist Hajimi Asama, who this week visited Stockholm, asking for access to robots that can make the response to disasters.
China s government fabricates about 488 million social media comments a year -- nearly the same as one day of Twitter s total global volume -- in a massive effort to distract its citizens from bad news and sensitive political debates, according to a study.Three scholars led by Gary King, a political scientist at Harvard University who specializes in using quantitative data to analyze public policy, ran the first systematic study of China s online propaganda workers, known as the Fifty Cent Party because they are popularly believed to be paid by the government 50 Chinese cents for every social media post.Contrary to popular perception inside China, the Fifty Cent Party avoids engaging in debates with critics and doesn t make fun of foreign governments."In retrospect, this makes a lot of sense -- stopping an argument is best done by distraction and changing the subject rather than more argument -- but this had previously been unknown, King said in an e-mail.Although those who post comments are often rumored to be ordinary citizens, the researchers were surprised to find that nearly all the posts were written by workers at government agencies including tax and human resource departments, and at courts.The archive included a mix of multiple e-mail formats, programs and attachments that required King and his team to build customized computer code to crack the archive and deploy automated text analysis and extraction.Typically, the Fifty Cent Party workers would go into action right after some kind of social unrest or protest and try to distract public opinion with a wave of social media that researchers said was interesting, but innocuous and unrelated topic.They researchers said they deduced the rules for the messages: First, don t engage in controversial issues.Second, stop discussion about potential collective or street protests by active distraction.
AllChinaTech recently talked with Tomotaka Takahashi, a robot creator and founder of Kyoto University s ROBO GARAGE.Inspired by the cartoon Astro Boy, Takahashi wanted to become a robotics scientist from the age of five.He started making his own robots as a university student.Robots that Takahashi has created include Mr. Evolta that climbed a Grand Canyon cliff within seven hours, rescue robot Enryu T-52 that can lift cars or other debris in the aftermath of a disaster, Ropid that can jump and run in a smooth and natural manner, and Kirobo , that acted as a Japanese-speaking companion on the international space station.Takahashi said that the shape and form of robots will become increasingly important.He would create prototypes by himself to help people understand robots possibilities and potential.Takashi s latest project is RoBoHon, literally meaning robot phone .In Takahashi s words, a cute little buddy that stands under 20cm tall.Additionally, he pointed out that there is little room for innovation in the smartphone industry nowadays, with most products looking alike.Takahashi wants to create a new era, where people live with robots like they are living with smartphones today.Top photo from Baidu Images
MyPORT, a new automated security system created by the Schindler Elevator Corporation, aims to eliminate this fuss.Once installed in a building, the technology allows those who work or live there to download a companion smartphone app that automatically opens doors and summons elevators."The idea is to be able to walk throughout a building seamlessly," Schindler's product manager Jeff Blain tells Tech Insider.When a user approaches a lobby turnstile, a bluetooth sensor installed by Schindler  recognizes their phone, even if it's inside a bag or pocket.Blain says the system is designed to make it simpler to enter your office or apartment, since it works with your phone which, chances are, is already in your hand anyway , thereby eliminating the need for a key card."We want to make people's lives easier in any way we can," he says.Since the system only grants entry to people holding verified phones, it could also eliminate the need for a human guard or doorman.For package deliveries, users get a notification on their phone, can see a video of the mailperson, and let them in or tell them to come back later.More from Tech Insider:The internet is obsessed with these stunning 'mirror cakes'Bill Gates says everyone should read this book about the moon blowing upEating breakfast isn't actually all that important, according to scienceThe entire country of Portugal ran on wind, solar, and hydropower for four days straight13 Stanford students reveal the apps they can't live withoutNOW WATCH: A hair scientist debunks the biggest myth about shavingLoading video...
It s a plan to gamify healthcare or incent good behavior in a way that the company s founders liken to the good driver discount that conscientious drivers receive on their insurance.The founding data scientist at Propeller Health and the architect of an epidemiological data product at Practice Fusion, had an experience where she walked away from a prescription when she realized it would cost her $150 out of pocket.You do things every day that save the health system money.Companies like GoodRx and Blink Health are also aiming to lower the cost of prescription drugs, but they re aiming to do it across the board, by giving consumers the option to comparison shop in the case of GoodRx or the ability to find the lowest priced drugs online and pick up the prescription at their local pharmacy Blink .Sempre s approach is different, and the founder argues that it s more compelling, because it reduces costs across the board no matter what, and it encourages better behavior from patients in the process.The company routes claims through partnerships with claims adjudicators to reduce costs and gain access to every pharmacy in the U.S.To ensure and encourage compliance with treatment regimes among patients, the company provides prompts via sms and other platforms, with a lot of the management handled by enterprise partners who work with the company s software as a service to take advantage of the data being generated as part of a online platform with dashboards.
We ve gotten a few tidbits about what to expect from Ridley Scott s Prometheus sequel, Alien: Covenant.Speaking to a newspaper in Australia, where Covenant is being filmed, Fassbender said Scott s sets mix high-tech space gadgets with an old-school element where things look battered, like the original Star Wars.Two different, but equally promising, points of comparison.Fassbender also noted that his character, android David—last seen as a disembodied head in the care of Noomi Rapace s scientist, who s not in Covenant—would be back in a whole new way.Whole way, as in a reconstructed synthetic being?But he does agree that the character was and is creepy, so he ll presumably still be more Ash than Bishop.
According to a new published paper in Nature Scientific Reports by Planetary Science Institute senior scientist J. Alexis Palmero Rodriguez, some kind of bolide impact triggered the enormous waves and completely wipeout any kind of shoreline features which scientists have been struggling to identify.The study comes after NASA announced last September that there was flowing liquid located on the Red Planet.Rodriguez and the paper s co-author Thomas Platz concluded the tsunamis occurred millions of years apart.The scientists concluded that during the time period between the two tsunamis, the ocean receded and caused Mars climate to become cooler.The study suggests that further sampling of the areas will likely find frozen ancient ocean water brines and may obtain much of the originally emplaced materials, which could be informative of the ocean s primary composition.Scientists believe that the Mars Pathfinder will be able to test the materials, given its proximity to the rover s landing site.
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