Police say the drone attack that disrupted flights at Gatwick Airport for 33 hours last December may have been carried out by an insider at the airport.Sussex Police said the possibility that an insider was involved was “credible”, while Gatwick’s chief operating officer said the attacker appeared to have knowledge of airport procedures.“It was clear that the drone operators had a link into what was going on at the airport,” said Chris Woodroofe, Gatwick’s chief operating officer, who oversaw the facility’s response to the incident.He said the attacker could apparently see what was happening on the runway, or was eavesdropping on the airport’s radio or internet communications.The drone used was “specifically selected” as one that could not be seen by the DJI Aeroscope drone-detection equipment Gatwick was testing at the time, Woodroofe told the BBC’s Panorama programme, in his first report since the incident.Sussex Police said it expects its inquiry to take “some months” to complete.
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Investigators from Sussex Police and helpers from the government have leaked their current thinking on last year's Gatwick shutdown, with investigators now leaning towards blaming a furious former or perhaps current employee for causing the aerial melt.Police are suggesting it was an "inside job" at the moment, according to sources speaking to The Times, who say Sussex Police, after conducting 1,100 interviews with witnesses and locals, have concluded the attacks were carried out by someone who must've had intimate knowledge of the Gatwick site layout and security arrangements.The source says the drone flew past the control tower – where the pilot knew it couldn't be photographed due to a ban on devices in the operations centre – and also seemed to hide behind low buildings, where its rogue operator knew it wouldn't be detected by the airport's detection systems.But if that's true, and costly drone-mitigation features can be outfoxed by simply hiding behind a shed for a bit, the airports are surely fighting a losing battle in this war on bored men with drones.
Two men have been arrested for disorderly behaviour following a brawl in Brighton, in which both of their faces were allegedly “blacked up”.Police were called to Western Road, at around 1.35pm on Tuesday, following reports that two men had painted their faces black and were fighting in front of shocked bystanders.One passer-by reportedly described the furore as an “unedifying sight” and “not what you expect to see outside Waitrose”, a witness told The Argus newspaper.A Sussex police spokesperson told HuffPost UK that a 36-year-old man of no fixed address was arrested on suspicion of displaying threatening or abusive writing or sign, two counts of racially or religiously aggravated harassment, and two counts of actual bodily harm.A 29-year-man from Worthing was arrested on the same charges, with an additional count of actual bodily harm.Both men have been released under investigation.
Investigators from Sussex Police and helpers from the government have leaked their current thinking on last year's Gatwick shutdown, with investigators now leaning towards blaming a furious former or perhaps current employee for causing the aerial melt.Police are suggesting it was an "inside job" at the moment, according to sources speaking to The Times, who say Sussex Police, after conducting 1,100 interviews with witnesses and locals, have concluded the attacks were carried out by someone who must've had intimate knowledge of the Gatwick site layout and security arrangements.The source says the drone flew past the control tower – where the pilot knew it couldn't be photographed due to a ban on devices in the operations centre – and also seemed to hide behind low buildings, where its rogue operator knew it wouldn't be detected by the airport's detection systems.But if that's true, and costly drone-mitigation features can be outfoxed by simply hiding behind a shed for a bit, the airports are surely fighting a losing battle in this war on bored men with drones.
Investigators from Sussex Police and helpers from the government have leaked their current thinking on last year's Gatwick shutdown, with investigators now leaning towards blaming a furious former or perhaps current employee for causing the aerial melt.Police are suggesting it was an "inside job" at the moment, according to sources speaking to The Times, who say Sussex Police, after conducting 1,100 interviews with witnesses and locals, have concluded the attacks were carried out by someone who must've had intimate knowledge of the Gatwick site layout and security arrangements.The source says the drone flew past the control tower – where the pilot knew it couldn't be photographed due to a ban on devices in the operations centre – and also seemed to hide behind low buildings, where its rogue operator knew it wouldn't be detected by the airport's detection systems.But if that's true, and costly drone-mitigation features can be outfoxed by simply hiding behind a shed for a bit, the airports are surely fighting a losing battle in this war on bored men with drones.
Sussex police are laying the groundwork for declaring the Gatwick drone shutdown one of the most bizarre crimes of a very bizarre year, with investigators currently saying that some drone sightings may have been of the good kind of police drone that was launched to investigate the original reports of rogue manbaby toys buzzing the airport.So maybe what happened was that an old lady saw a light atop a lamppost and panicked, the police launched their toys to investigate, then everyone else spotted the police drones and panicked and reported evil machines menacing the skies.Local chief constable Giles York said he's sure that the very first sightings that led to the initial shutdown were genuine, though, but explained that his own team may have made things worse, saying: "We will have launched our own Sussex police drones at the time with a view to investigate, with a view to engage, with a view to survey the area looking for the drone, so there could be some level of confusion there."
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Two drones found by police near Gatwick Airport have been ruled out of involvement in the incident which disrupted hundreds of flights before Christmas, Sussex chief constable Giles York has said.York told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that police have searched 26 potential launch sites for drones near the airport but do not believe they have found the drone believed to have been flown near runways on December 19 and 20.“I don’t think we have found the drone responsible for this at this time,” said the Chief Constable.“I think the fact that we have found two drones so far as a result of this does show the extent of the search that has been carried out.I am led to believe that we are able to rules those drones out of this investigation at this time.”York said he was “absolutely certain that there was a drone flying throughout the period that the airport was closed”.
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Detectives hunting the Gatwick Airport drone operator are not ruling out the possibility that no drone activity took place.Sussex Police insisted they are “not back to square one”, despite releasing the two prime suspects initially held, adding they are working with witness accounts.Detective Chief Superintendent Jason Tingley added there was no available footage of the drones.Police said there were some “persons of interest” after a damaged drone was found inside the airport’s perimeter fence.It follows the decision to release a man and a woman from nearby Crawley without charge.The pair, aged 47 and 54 respectively, made no comment as they darted inside their home on Sunday morning, having been arrested on Friday evening following a “tip-off” from a member of the public.
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A damaged drone has been found close to Gatwick Airport in the wake of severe disruption this week, its staff have confirmed to HuffPost UK.It will undergo “fast-tracked” forensic tests in attempt to find out who was controlling it.This morning a couple arrested on suspicion of being behind the rogue drone were released without charge.Sussex Police Detective Chief Superintendent Jason Tingley told Sky News: “I can say yesterday we recovered a damaged drone close to the perimeter of Gatwick Airport... and we will be doing everything we can with regards to progressing a forensic examination of that drone.”“That’s something that will be fast-tracked and expedited,” he added.This comes as airport bosses offer a £50,000 reward through Crimestoppers for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the criminal act that ruined the travel plans of thousands.
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Following a drone incident that grounded planes and disrupted operations at the UK’s second-largest airport just days ahead of Christmas, officials say they have made two arrests in connection with the event.Large drones appeared over London’s Gatwick Airport on Wednesday, resulting in chaos during one of the busiest travel times of the year.Sussex Police now say they arrested a 54-year-old woman and 47-year-old man, both of whom were said to be from neighbouring Crawley, just after 10 p.m. on Friday.The two individuals were arrested on “suspicion of disrupting services of civil aviation aerodrome to endanger or likely to endanger safety of operations or persons.”“As part of our ongoing investigations into the criminal use of drones which has severely disrupted flights in and out of Gatwick Airport, Sussex Police made two arrests,” Superintendent James Collis of the Sussex Police said in a statement on Saturday.“Our investigations are still on-going, and our activities at the airport continue to build resilience to detect and mitigate further incursions from drones, by deploying a range of tactics.”
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UK police have arrested two individuals in connection with flight disruptions at London Gatwick Airport.The pair, a 47-year-old man and a 54-year-old woman were arrested late on Friday, according to the Sussex Police.Air traffic at Gatwick, England’s second largest airport, was disrupted when a drone was spotted flying in the area on Wednesday, prompting the airport to suspend flights through Friday.Flights were diverted to other airports, and authorities ended up bringing in the British Army, which media reports say set up an Israeli-built drone defense system called a “Drone Dome,” designed to intercept the device’s radio signals.Flights resumed at the airport on Friday.Sussex Police did not identify the individuals, other than to say that they were being held on “suspicion of disrupting services of civil aviation aerodrome to endanger or likely to endanger safety of operations or persons,” and that the investigation was ongoing.
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The drone-caused chaos at London's Gatwick airport has resulted in two arrests.Sussex police said Saturday that they'd taken a man and woman into custody on suspicion of disrupting services at the UK's second-busiest airport "to endanger or likely to endanger safety of operations or persons."Gatwick's airfield was closed for more than a day after drones were spotted nearby on Wednesday night local time.It reopened Friday morning before being shut down again briefly after another drone sighting.The closures caused problems for tens of thousands of holiday travelers, as flights were canceled, delayed or diverted.The police department's investigation is ongoing, Sussex police Superintendent James Collis said in a statement.
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A man and a woman have been arrested in connection with the “criminal use of drones” which caused widespread disruption at Gatwick Airport.More than 100,000 passengers were left stranded at the UK’s second biggest airport after flights were grounded following a number of drone sightings near the airfield from Wednesday night.Sussex Police said the two were detained by officers “in the Gatwick area” at around 10pm on Friday.Meanwhile, Gatwick Airport said on Saturday morning that the runway is open but passengers are urged to check with their airline before travelling.The airport fully reopened on Friday, with police saying “proactive investigations” are ongoing.A handful of flights due to arrive into Gatwick on Saturday have been cancelled, according to the airport’s website, including an easyJet service from Milan-Linate and a TUI flight from Bridgetown, Barbados.
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Strange tale leaves 120k bods displaced during Xmas rushLondon Gatwick Airport has reopened after closing for more than a day due to a seemingly deliberate drone disruption ploy – but police still haven't caught the perpetrators.The errant drones, which are of an unknown make and model according to Sussex Police, were being flown near enough to Gatwick's runway to trigger a full shutdown of the airport.While police eventually did not rule out shooting down the drones, El Reg has a handy guide here to all the immediate answers bubbling up in people's heads about how to stop the devices.It appears more than one craft was being flown at intervals from different locations, just often enough to keep the airport closed down.Police reported that they had had 50 sightings of the drones in the last day alone.
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(Reuters) — London’s Gatwick Airport reopened on Friday after a mystery saboteur wrought 36 hours of travel chaos for more than 100,000 Christmas travelers by using drones to play cat-and-mouse with police snipers and the army.After the biggest disruption at Gatwick, Britain’s second busiest airport, since a volcanic ash cloud in 2010, Gatwick said around 700 planes were due to take off on Friday, although there would still be delays and cancellations.“This kind of incident is unprecedented anywhere in the world.”The motivation of the drone operator, or operators, was unclear.Gatwick’s drone nightmare is thought to be the most disruptive yet at a major airport and indicates a new vulnerability that will be scrutinized by security forces and airport operators across the world.Sussex Police Assistant Chief Constable Steve Barry said they were keeping an open mind about who was responsible.
Gatwick is at an absolute standstill today, and while you could make some snide comments about the airport's usual efficiency (the budget airlines aren't generally known for being 100% prompt) you have to concede that this whole situation is an absolute shitshow.All thanks to some dickhead that's been flying a drone around the airport, and stranding thousands of people.With the latest update confirming the airport will be closed until at least 10pm, more than 24 hours after the drone incident began, it's now been revealed Sussex police have requested help from the military to hunt down the bastard with his stupid flying toy.This was then confirmed by defence secretary Gavin Williamson who told journalists that the armed forces will use “unique military capability” to help but an end to the person (or people, I assume) responsible.Full Gavin Williamson quote on Gatwick drone crisis pic.twitter.com/oHPy5Gdi6BAs you can see in the above quote, it's not clear what capacity the military operation will involve.
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One of the UK’s biggest airports has been shut down for more than 17 hours, after rogue drones were spotted over the runway.The sightings above Gatwick Airport, one of the airports serving London and the second largest in the UK, have forced air traffic controllers there to cancel all incoming and outgoing flights across all airlines.“We anticipate disruption to continue throughout the day and into tomorrow,” the airport said in a statement today.“Any passengers due to fly today or tomorrow should not set off for Gatwick without checking flight information with their airline.”Two drones were identified flying over the airfield at around 9pm local time on Wednesday, December 19.Multiple sightings followed, forcing the airport to suspend flights “while we investigate this alongside Sussex Police,” the local police force, it said in a statement.
Thousands of passengers at one of the UK’s busiest airports after drones were seen flying over Gatwick airport on Wednesday evening and Thursday morning.In 2016 for example, a ‘drone‘ collided with an A320 passenger jet that was on final approach to London’s Heathrow Airport.But Gatwick it seems has no defences in place yet.Remember, in the UK it is illegal to fly a drone in the vicinity (1 kilometre) of an airport, as well as fly drones “beyond the direct unaided line of sight”.“Following reports of two drones flying over the Gatwick Airport airfield at around 9pm on Wednesday 19 December, and several further sightings since, our airfield remains closed for safety reasons,” it stated.“We are still investigating these alongside Sussex Police.”
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One of the UK's busiest airports had to suspend or divert all flights after drones were seen over its airfield.The disruption at Gatwick Airport, which is 30 miles south of London and Britain's second busiest, started around 9 p.m. local time Wednesday after a pair of drones were spotted, according to the BBC.The runway remained closed until 3 a.m., but was shut down again 45 minutes later after "a further sighting of drones."It was still closed as of Thusday morning and police are hunting for the drones' operator, Chris Woodroofe, Gatwick's chief operating officer, told the BBC."There are no indications to suggest this is terror related," Sussex Police tweeted on Thursday, before seeking the public's help to identify the operator.It's illegal to fly a drone within 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) of an airport or airfield boundary, and you can't fly it above 120 meters (400 feet) because it increases the likelihood of an aircraft hitting it.
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Sir Winston Churchill, perhaps the greatest orator of the 20th century, is renowned for delivering awe-inspiring speeches, including the legendary "We shall fight on the beaches" address.A startling discovery was recently made at a branch of Churchill's favorite tailor shop from yesteryear.Several bank notes dating all the way back to World War II, worth $2.5 million in today's money, have been found at the location of Cotswold Outdoor store in Brighton, which was formerly Bradley Gowns, a branch of a well-known London-based furrier frequented by Churchill and his wife, Lady Clementine.The face value of the £1 and £5 notes totals about £30,000, according to the BBC, which first reported the news.In today's money, adjusting for inflation, the notes are worth approximately £1 million ($2.5 million).The notes were found by Cotswold Outdoor's owner, Russ Davis, when construction workers were tearing up old layers of carpet and tile.
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