Other job ads make similar mistakes, and candidates do worse IBM's Global Technology Services has posted a job ad calling for candidates with a “minimum 12+ years’ experience in Kubernetes administration and management”.…
Heikki Saukkomaa/Lehtikuva via AP FINLAND OUTHELSINKI AP — American biochemical engineer Frances Arnold, whose discoveries in "directed evolution" have helped produce medicines, including drugs for treating diabetes, on Tuesday was awarded this year's euro 1 million $1.2 million Millennium Technology Prize.The 59-year-old professor of chemical engineering, bioengineering and biochemistry at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was cited for "groundbreaking work that has a great impact on areas such as pharmaceuticals and gene therapy," with hundreds of laboratories and companies around the world using methods she developed, committee chairman Jarl-Thure Eriksson said."Directed evolution, which mimics natural evolution to create new and better proteins in the laboratory, uses the power of biology and evolution to solve many important problems, often replacing less efficient and sometimes harmful technologies," the citation said.Crowdsourcing, problem-solving — nature's been doing that for several billion years," she said.Past winners include Tim Berners-Lee for inventing the World Wide Web, Shuji Nakamura, the inventor of bright blue and white LEDs, and ethical stem-cell pioneer Shinya Yamanaka.The previous winner, in 2014, was British-American physicist Stuart Parkin for discoveries leading to a thousand-fold increase in digital data storage on magnetic disks used in large data centers, cloud services, social networks and downloads of music and film online.
The debate over the Investigatory Powers Bill has been rumbling on for some time.The proposed law, which would legitimise bulk internet data collection by the government on what we do on the internet has long horrified digital rights activists – and now the bill has received arguably its highest profile criticism yet.Speaking to The Economist radio on the openness of the web, he said:There are a huge number of fronts on which we have to battle.He then went on to urge the show's listeners to write to their MPs to express their opposition to the Bill.Jim Killock, Executive Director of the group said:When the inventor of the web, says that the IPBill is inappropriate, we hope that the Government will pay attention.Last time around, Labour and the SNP abstained over the proposals, though Labour has since demanded an "independent review" into the bulk data collection powers.
The debate over the Investigatory Powers Bill has been rumbling on for some time.The proposed law, which would legitimise bulk internet data collection by the government on what we do on the internet has long horrified digital rights activists – and now the bill has received arguably its highest profile criticism yet.Speaking to The Economist radio on the openness of the web, he said:There are a huge number of fronts on which we have to battle.He then went on to urge the show's listeners to write to their MPs to express their opposition to the Bill.Jim Killock, Executive Director of the group said:When the inventor of the web, says that the IPBill is inappropriate, we hope that the Government will pay attention.Last time around, Labour and the SNP abstained over the proposals, though Labour has since demanded an "independent review" into the bulk data collection powers.
With the robot economy looming large in the coming decades, one solution to vanishing jobs may simply be to give people money regardless of whether or not they work.That idea is called "basic income," and it just gained the support of one of the tech world's founding fathers, Internet inventor Tim Berners-Lee."I think a basic income is one of the ways of addressing massive global inequality," Berners-Lee, who founded the Web in 1989, explained on a recent episode of The Economist podcast.For Berners-Lee, it's not so important whether technology is driving inequality or if it's increasing because of some other force.Regardless of whether someone is a doctor or a janitor, they'd receive the same stipend each month on top of their normal salary to help cover basic expenses like food, shelter, and clothing.And they'd receive that money even if they decided to quit their job altogether.As a kind of antidote to America's convoluted tax code, basic income could simplify and strengthen the country's safety net.A radical solution may be the only escape.And basic income is radical, but the idea has attracted a lot of attention within the last year.Switzerland will hold a referendum on basic income on June 5, with a proposed monthly salary of roughly $1,650.Though the proposal will likely fail, the vote marks the first concrete step taken towards mandating basic income since a small Canadian town gave it a shot in the 1970s.
But what if we could create a decentralized web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.Every discussion was focused on how to distribute, process, and host data with no centralized control.Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.Tim Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.
But what if we could create a decentralised web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.During the summit, dozens of sessions were held about creating an internet with no central control.Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.
Technology leaders are meeting in San Francisco this week to discuss making the Internet a more decentralized, secure, and less censored place, with an emphasis on privacy and preserving history.The event, called the Decentralized Web Summit, is focused on locking the web open.The idea is that the Web could be a place where governments don t spy or censor information, where culture is preserved, and information is stored in a decentralized way.The Decentralized Web aims to make the Web open, secure and free of censorship by distributing data, processing, and hosting across millions of computers around the world, with no centralized control, the summit s websitedeclares.Another focus is on new digital payment systems— a move away from entering credit card information and towards new tech that gives people more control and takes the focus away from advertising.Follow news about the summit on Twitter: DWebSummitMore from FoxNews.com Tech:
Governments spying on its citizens, some of them blocking selected websites and companies dominate the cloud. But what if we could create a more decentralized Internet with more room for privacy, less government control and less impact from the company. Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, wants to do just that. Call The topics ranged from things that new methods of distrubera websites without using a standard web server, add encryption for different parts of the network, and archive all versions of a web page. Each discussion focused on how the Internet could distruberas, use and maintain the data without any central control. In the future, the goal is that this will be more difficult.
Today Prince William exhorted tech leaders to do something about cyber-bullying at the Founders Forum conference in London.The Duke of Cambridge said that as a parent he had been appalled by examples of online abuse, and while he stressed that new technology could be a force for good he added: What we were seeing was that social media and messaging had transformed bullying from something that was not only the torment of the classroom and playground, but something that followed you home as well – to the one safe haven that children should have.The robot helpfully fell over.accuRx – a big data tool to help clinicians make more accurate prescription decisions and reduce the use of antibiotics.Additionally, it held an event this week, Accelerate-Her , about improving gender diversity in the tech industry by advocating flexible working, adult internships for older women, promoting STEM subjects and highlighting female investors.FF has also also started Founders Factory, with the aim of launching 200 startups in the next 5 years by working with corporate partners.
Well, this will certainly help.The NY TimesHow Yahoo derailed Tumblr Marissa Mayer was running late.Government regulations follow the laws of unintended consequences, and the immediate fear surrounding this new directive from the FCC was that WiFi router manufacturers would make the easiest engineering decision.HackadayReweaving the web Tim Berners-Lee ends "Weaving the Web", a book written in the late 1990s, on an optimistic note: "The experience of seeing the web take off by the grassroots effort of thousands gives me tremendous hope that…we can collectively make our world what we want."Nearly two decades later the inventor of the web no longer sounds as cheerful.EconomistWindows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 graphics performance with Nvidia's GTX 1070 & GTX 1080 Lastly are some results of Unigine Heaven/Valley under Windows and Linux.
We don t recommend basing your vote on technology alone, but it s important to consider how the decision will affect one of the UK s fastest growing sectors before you cast your vote on Thursday.Some of the key tech players throwing their lot in with Remain include: Bill Gates Founder of Microsoft , Richard Branson Founder of Virgin , Stephen Hawking Award-winning physicist , Stephen Fry Actor and technology columnist , Dr Ian Robertson Board member at BMW, Gavin Patterson CEO of BT , Martha Lane Fox Founder of Lastminute.com , Dido Harding CEO of TalkTalk , Ronan Dunne CEO of Telefonica O2 UK , David Stokes CEO of IBM , and Tim Berners-Lee inventor of the World Wide Web .Our trade imbalance with Europe is running at £9 billion a month and rising.The study revealed that the key issues for the Remainers were:Access to a large single market, with harmonised regulationsFree movement of labour, giving access to a talented workforceHaving a seat at the table Stability and securityThe key issues for Leavers, meanwhile, were:SovereigntyOver-regulation and red tape These results aren t surprising, explains Coadec in its survey analysis.Robert Newry, who founded technology recruitment service Arctic Shores, believes that the current interest in UK start-ups will dry up if we leave the EU: We currently have 14 employees, four are European, three of whom are first-generation.Alex Hemsley, who co-founded Global M, an international technology recruitment start-up based in London, said that being in the EU makes it much easier to hire people in the tech sector: The great thing about being a member of the EU when it comes to hiring is that the search for talent is not constrained by borders or hindered by red tape and therefore startups are free to concentrate on sourcing the best talent quickly and efficiently to support their growth.
Before he can continue his battle cry, he s interrupted by someone in the crowd, who suggests aqueducts.In other words, simply providing access to month-old movies is no longer compelling to consumers — that business is a race to the bottom.Then, in the late 1990s, two things happened: first, TiVo was invented — technology that enabled consumers to skip commercials.As I noted in a column for The Huffington Post, Google has further improved its system for serving relevant ads through the concept of Quality Score :Quality Score not only factors in CTR, but also the relevancy of an advertiser s landing page — evaluated in part by human reviewers and in part by data Google collects on how people interact with that page.As one senior Google product manager told me, Google is optimizing not just for a single click, but to ensure that consumers will find enough relevancy in Google ads that they will click on ads in the future.There is an advertising industrial complex that employs hundreds of thousands of people whose livelihoods depend on the continued viability of the current advertising system.
How to join the networkTim Berners-Lee created the web in 1989.Twenty-seven years later, he s asking for a reinvention.The web has made life easier, but it has also introduced challenges and ethical questions pertaining to personal data, access to information and privacy.Berners-Lee laments that the web has morphed into a surveillance network filled with corporate hackers and government spooks with the tools to troll your every keystroke and mine your personal data.How much further can we go down this road before crossing the line between convenience and forfeiting privacy completely?
Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, has written an open letter calling for European citizens to save the open internet by joining a public consultation on net neutrality.EU regulators are currently working on guidelines surrounding net neutrality – which is the principle that all internet traffic is equal – having voted on new legislation last year.However, Sir Tim, along with law professors Barbara van Schewick and Larry Lessig, has urged the public to engage in the consultation, which runs until July 18, in order to pressure regulators into closing what they call potential loopholes that could threaten net neutrality.Network neutrality for hundreds of millions of Europeans is within our grasp, the letter says.Securing this is essential to preserve the open Internet as a driver for economic growth and social progress.But the public needs to tell regulators now to strengthen safeguards, and not cave in to telecommunications carriers manipulative tactics.
This week, Tech.eu tracked 14 technology M transactions and 57 funding deals totaling €260 million, about $287 million in Europe, Turkey, and Israel.Here s an overview of the 10 biggest European tech news items from this week:1 The EU announced on Thursday a new round of antitrust charges against Google — the third set since early 2015 — claiming that some of the company s advertising products had restricted consumer choice.2 Microsoft has won a court appeal to prevent it having to hand email data located on Irish servers over to US authorities.3 Microsoft also confirmed last Monday that it will close its Finnish mobile phone unit and cut up to 1,350 jobs in the Nordic country.4 German chipmaker Infineon Technologies has agreed to buy Wolfspeed Power and RF for $850 million from U.S. company Cree, as it bets on new energy-efficient chips it expects will dominate the market in the next decade.5 Uber had a rough week in Europe – drivers in Denmark were fined, and the company has been forced to pull out of Hungary after the introduction of tough new laws by prime minister Viktor Orban.6 Some of the leading fintech companies in Europe have joined forces to launch the European Fintech Alliance EFA in Berlin.7 Cloud9 IDE, an Amsterdam/San Francisco-based startup that offers a cloud-based integrated development environment IDE in which developers can quickly start building applications and collaborate with others, has been acquired by Amazon Web Services.8 Germany has launched a support program for automated and connected driving, making available up to €80 million for research projects until 2020.In related news, Germany s electric car discount scheme has greatly spurred new BMW i3 sales.9 Opera Software on Friday said it will communicate by early Monday whether all the conditions of a $1.24 billion takeover bid by a Chinese consortium have been met.10 Investment firm Marlin Equity Partners has closed €325 million for its first dedicated fund in Europe.Bonus link: Tim Berners-Lee, the man who invented the World Wide Web, has pleaded with EU regulators to sew up loopholes in the bloc s new net neutrality rules, rules that aim to maintain a level playing field on the internet.Subscribe to the weekly Tech.eu Newsletter here.This post was first published on Tech.eu.
It's hard to work up a good lump in the throat in sympathy for a bureaucrat, but staff at the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications BEREC probably need just a little: they're going to have to work through 400,000 submissions about Net Neutrality in the EU.Volker Sypli of German telco regulator BNetzA gave the number while briefing the 96th Internet Research Task Force IETF meeting in Berlin this week on the progress of its consultation.Considering the consultation is supposed to result in an implementation plan by the end of August, BEREC has its work cut out for it just reading so many documents.That implementation plan includes standardising how national regulators should monitor Internet quality of service, and what should be in an EU-wide net neutrality toolkit.Heise reported from the meeting that IETF chair Lars Eggert said some kind of traffic management is going to be a reality on the Internet, because traffic growth keeps running ahead of investment in capacity.The BEREC presentation comes in the context of strong pushback to European carriers' claim that 5G will need special rules to justify the investment in network rollout.
You may have seen some chatter here and there about the decentralized web — it s something passionately pursued by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, for instance.But there isn t a really clear definition of what the term means — and really, considering its nature, it would be surprising if there were.There are, therefore, a variety of opinions, as Syracuse University s School of Information found out when they pinged two dozen tech experts and leaders.Brewster Kahle of the Internet Archive takes a literal but admirably concise approach: Websites served from many locations; locations that are not coordinated.Arizona State s Eric Newton took to metaphor: It is to communication what local farming is to food.With it people can grow their own information.
On this day 25 years ago, August 6, 1991, the world's first website went live to the public from a lab in the Swiss Alps.So Happy 25th Birthday, WWW!The world's first website, which ran on a NeXT computer at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN , can still be visited today, more than two decades after its creation.The first website address is http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html."The project started with the philosophy that much academic information should be freely available to anyone."Berners-Lee wrote about the HyperText Transfer Protocol HTTP that outlined how information or data would travel between computer systems, as well as, HyperText Markup Language HTML that was used to create the first web page.Berners-Lee vision was to create a place where people could share information across the world through a "universal linked information system" – in which a network of documents web pages linked to one another could help users navigate to find what exactly they need.And so is the concept of the World Wide Web.
Today marks the 25 anniversary of Sir Tim Berners-Lee launching the first websiteOn this day 25 years ago the world's first website went live to the public.The site, created by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, was a basic text page with hyperlinked words that connected to other pages."The WWW project merges the techniques of information retrieval and hypertext to make an easy but powerful global information system," said Berners-Lee on the world's first public website.The NeXT computer Sir Tim Berners-Lee used to create the World Wide Web is still housed at CERNThe first step to making that a reality occurred on August 6, 1991, and was hailed with little fanfare when Berners Lee launched the first web page from his NeXT computer at CERN's headquarters in Geneva.
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