Critics, including Trump's former intelligence briefer, are concerned that he cannot be trusted with classified information after leaving office.
Roger Stone was convicted of multiple counts including making false statements, witness tampering, and obstruction of justice.
The US doesn't have "the personnel, the language skills, the expertise and the prioritization of resources" needed to deal with China, Rep. Adam Schiff says.
Former Cabinet minister Chris Grayling has quit the Commons Intelligence and Security (ISC) committee just weeks after he was blocked from heading the influential body.The ex-transport secretary has written to the man who beat him to the chairmanship of the committee last month, Julian Lewis, to tender his resignation from the ISC.Lewis was expelled from the parliamentary Conservative Party after being elected head of the body with the backing of opposition MPs.In the aftermath of the vote for chairman, Lewis condemned what he called Downing Street’s attempt to impose its “preferred candidate” to lead the committee.The move came after Grayling was widely seen as prime minister Boris Johnson’s favoured candidate for the prestigious job.In a statement at the time, Lewis said that the 2013 Justice and Security Act explicitly removed the right of the prime minister to choose the ISC chairman and gave it to the committee members.Amid the controversy, Downing Street denied that that the government was seeking to “parachute” a preferred candidate in to the chairmanship, insisting that it was a matter for the senior parliamentarians on the committee to decide.The impression that the prime minister wanted Grayling to head the committee – which oversees the work of the intelligence agencies MI5, MI6 and GCHQ – drew raised eyebrows across the political spectrum.Unlike previous chairmen, the former transport secretary had little experience of security matters and was dubbed “failing Grayling” for a series of policy blunders during his time in government.The decision to withdraw the government whip from Lewis left the Conservatives without a majority on the nine-member committee.The spat over the chairmanship came ahead of the release of a much delayed report by the ISC on alleged Russian interference in UK politics.Johnson had been heavily criticised for blocking its publication ahead of last December’s general election. Related... How Julian Lewis Pulled Off A Very British Coup To Chair The Intelligence And Security Committee Chris Grayling Fails To Become Intelligence Committee Chairman Tories Withdraw Whip From Julian Lewis After Beating Chris Grayling To Top Job
In testimony yesterday before the House Intelligence Committee, diplomat William Taylor said that he had recently learned of a phone call between George Sondland—the US ambassador to the European Union—and President Donald Trump.Taylor, the senior diplomat for the US in Ukraine, said that his staff overheard Trump during a call with Sondland while at dinner with the ambassador at a restaurant in Kiev.But as anyone in national or diplomatic security will attest to, an open phone call between the president and an ambassador regarding topics of diplomatic interest in a public place like a restaurant—a place where any foreign intelligence organization could be monitoring for collection purposes—would be a major breach of operational (and national) security.How to not do presidential opsec: Crisis management over dinner in publicThis is not the first time that the administration has let issues of national security play out before a public audience.In February of 2017, President Trump consulted with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe regarding a North Korean ballistic missile test and made phone calls from the restaurant of his Mar-A-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, in plain view and within earshot of other diners—some of whom essentially live-streamed the situation from their cell phones.
Ransomware has steadily become one of the most pervasive cyberattacks in the world.And while high-profile global meltdowns like 2017’s NotPetya strain garner the most attention, localized attacks have devastating consequences as well.Look no further than the cities of Atlanta and Baltimore, whose online operations ground to a halt after ransomware takeovers.Or more recently, Alabama’s DCH Health Systems, which had to turn away all but the most critical patients from its three hospitals after hackers seized control of their networks.Hackers have increasingly focused on so-called managed service providers, companies that remotely handle IT infrastructure for a wide range of customers, to get the highest return on their investment.Yet despite the clear and pervasive danger, Congress seems stumped.
On September 26, the House Intelligence Committee held a hearing to investigate a whistle-blower complaint against President Donald Trump.In Congressman Devin Nunes’ opening remarks, he argued that this was just another example of news media and Democratic “information warfare” spreading “hoaxes” that delegitimize the president.His argument was similar to his remarks during a June 12 House Intelligence Committee hearing, where he referred to the Mueller Report as a “shoddy political hit piece” created through a “perfect feedback loop” between intelligence leakers, key intelligence figures, Democrats, and the media who perpetuate “fake outrage.” These remarks do more than assert his position.A careful analysis reveals how strategic keyword signaling amplifies conservative agendas in the contemporary news environment.Francesca Tripodi is an assistant professor at James Madison University.We increasingly turn to search engines to seek out information.
Senator Kamala Harris has a message for Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey: It’s past time to eject President Trump, America’s Tweeter in Chief, from the platform.On Tuesday, the presidential hopeful penned a letter to Dorsey pointing to several recent Trump tweets, including the now-infamous “Civil War” tweet and several targeting the whistle-blower and House Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff, as evidence that the president has violated Twitter’s policies against harassment and incitement of violence.Who wants to guess what that response is going to be?In 2018, after taunting North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un in tweets that many people felt threatened nuclear war, many Democrats, watchdog organizations, and commentators called for Twitter to ban Trump.Twitter refused, citing concerns like censorship and the inherent newsworthiness of presidential tweets.Twitter is especially not likely to do this since it has updated its rules to avoid the conversation Harris is trying to have.
Last week at the Black Hat cybersecurity conference in Las Vegas, the Democratic National Committee tried to raise awareness of the dangers of AI-doctored videos by displaying a deepfaked video of DNC Chair Tom Perez.But there’s doubt over whether tech companies are ready to deal with deepfakes.Earlier this month, Rep. Adam Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, expressed concern that Google, Facebook, and Twitter don’t have no clear plan to deal with the problem.Mounting fear over the potential onslaught of deepfakes has spurred a slate of projects and efforts to detect deepfakes and other image- and video-tampering techniques.The researchers found that neural networks trained on eye blinking videos could localize eye blinking segments in videos and examine the sequence of frames for unnatural movements.However, with the technology becoming more advanced every day, it’s just a matter of time until someone manages to create deepfakes that can blink naturally.
More specifically, he’ll field questions from the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees in two separate sessions.We'll be live-streaming it right here, bright and early.Mueller will start his day at 8:30 am ET with a three-hour House Judiciary Committee session focused on obstruction of justice.And while Attorney General William Barr opted not to pursue charges against Trump, Mueller’s report says that “if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, we are unable to reach that judgment.” Expect plenty of questions about the gap between what the report says and how Barr framed it—and declined to act on it—especially given that Mueller has already directly complained to Barr about that very thing.The House Intelligence Committee will follow up after a short break; expect that portion to kick off at around noon, and to last two hours.
More specifically, he’ll field questions from the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees in two separate sessions.We'll be live-streaming it right here, bright and early.Mueller will start his day at 8:30 am ET with a three-hour House Judiciary Committee session focused on obstruction of justice.And while attorney general William Barr opted not to pursue charges against Trump, Mueller’s report says that “if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, we are unable to reach that judgment.” Expect plenty of questions about the gap between what the report says and how Barr framed it—and declined to act on it—especially given that Mueller has already directly complained to Barr about that very thing.The House Intelligence Committee will follow up after a short break; expect that portion to kick off at around noon, and to last two hours.
Congress is planning to hold two hearings Wednesday in which it will question Robert Mueller, the former FBI head who was appointed two years ago to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.Mueller also investigated accusations that President Donald Trump obstructed justice.The report included details on the 34 indictments brought against people during the probe, ranging from Russian propagandists to Trump's former campaign manager, Paul Manafort.Mueller's team concluded there was "insufficient evidence" to determine whether Trump or his aides engaged in a criminal conspiracy with the Russians.They also declined to clear the president of obstruction of justice."If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the president clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state," the report read.
Top House Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) issued a warning on Thursday that deepfake videos could have a disastrous effect on the 2020 election cycle.“Now is the time for social media companies to put in place policies to protect users from this kind of misinformation not in 2021 after viral deepfakes have polluted the 2020 elections,” Schiff said.“By then it will be too late.”The warning came during a House Intelligence Committee hearing focused on analyzing the national and election security risks of the technology.The committee convened a panel of experts from universities and think tanks to prepare a deepfake strategy to guide new restrictions from both the government and platforms.At the outset of the hearing, Schiff came out challenging the “immunity” given to platforms under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, asking panelists if Congress should make changes to the law that doesn’t currently hold social media companies liable for the content on their platforms.
The differing responses underscore the challenge that manipulated video, and misinformation more broadly, pose for the companies.On Thursday, the House Intelligence Committee is scheduled to hold a hearing on manipulated media and "deepfakes," a technique that uses AI to create videos of people doing or saying something they didn't.The Pelosi video, a simpler form of edited video that some viewers thought was real, isn't considered a deepfake, but will likely be part of the discussion.The problem will likely get worse.Early deepfakes relied on hundreds or thousands of photographs of the person being faked to get convincing results.Samsung recently said it had developed a technique that allows relatively realistic fake videos to be created from a single image.
Huawei is indefinitely delaying the announcement of a new Windows laptop, The Information reported Tuesday.The laptop was scheduled to be unveiled this week.Huawei is the world's second-largest phone manufacturer by volume, but it has struggled to make a dent in the US, partly because of concerns expressed by the government, including the FBI, CIA, NSA, the Federal Communications Commission and House Intelligence Committee.The core issue with Huawei has been concerns over its coziness with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.In May, President Donald Trump issued a national security order banning Huawei from the US.Google, Facebook and other US tech companies have since broken ties with the Chinese company.
Silence might speak louder than words for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has criticized Facebook for not removing a video that was altered to make her seem drunk.On Tuesday, The Washington Post reported that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg called Pelosi to talk about how the company deals with misinformation but that she wasn't "eager" to hear his explanation and didn't call back.Their staff members have been in touch, though, according to the Post, which cited unnamed people familiar with the matter.Tensions between the California Democrat and the world's largest social network have escalated after Facebook decided to leave up the doctored Pelosi clip.Facebook doesn't label the video itself as manipulated, but on desktop computers it shows articles from fact-checkers alongside the clip, and it reduced the video's reach on NewsFeed.Twitter also left up the video.
Congress is looking to investigate deepfakes after the appearance of doctored videos of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, says a Tuesday report from CNN.Deepfakes, video forgeries that make people appear to be doing or saying things they didn't, are the moving-picture equivalent of bogus images created with programs like Photoshop.Deepfake software has made manipulated videos accessible and increasingly harder to detect as fake.Speaking with CNN, House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff, a Democrat from California, reportedly said the Russian fake news campaign during the 2016 presidential election could escalate for the 2020 presidential race thanks to deepfakes."The most severe escalation might be the introduction of a deepfake -- a video of one of the candidates saying something they never said," Schiff said.Schiff called the Pelosi video a "cheap fake."
President Donald Trump is expected to sign an executive order as early as this week that could pave the way for banning US companies from using equipment from Chinese telecom giant Huawei, Reuters reported Tuesday.The order, which has been under consideration for more than a year, won't name specific companies or countries, the news agency reported, citing unidentified sources described as familiar with the plan.The order still could be delayed further, they say.The order is expected to invoke the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, a federal law that authorizes the president to regulate commerce after declaring a national emergency in response to an extraordinary threat to the US.Huawei is the world's second-largest phone manufacturer by volume, but it has struggled to make a dent in the US, partly because of concerns expressed by the government, including the FBI, CIA, NSA, the Federal Communications Commission and House Intelligence Committee.The core issue with Huawei has been concerns over its coziness with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.
The CIA has accused Huawei of funding from Chinese state security, The Times reported Saturday, adding to the list of security allegations dogging the embattled Chinese telecommunications giant.The CIA has warned intelligence officials that Huawei receives funding from China's National Security Commission, the People's Liberation Army and a third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network, a source in Britain told the newspaper.The US intelligence agency shared the information earlier this year with Britain, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, the newspaper reported.Huawei is the world's second-largest phone manufacturer by volume, but it has struggled to make a dent in the US, partly because of concerns expressed by the government, including the FBI, CIA, NSA, the Federal Communications Commission and House Intelligence Committee.The core issue with Huawei has been concerns over its coziness with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.It's the reason why the US banned companies from using Huawei networking equipment in 2012.
Almost immediately after special counsel Robert Mueller's report on his investigation became public in a redacted version, several Democrats formally requested he testify before Congress about the inquiry."Even in its incomplete form, the Mueller report outlines disturbing evidence that President Trump engaged in obstruction of justice and other misconduct," Rep. Jerrold Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said in a statement Thursday.Nadler sent a letter to Mueller, requesting he testify before his committee by May 23.Separately, Rep. Adam Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, sent Mueller a letter asking that he appear before Schiff's committee sometime next month.Without sending a formal letter, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, said on Twitter that Mueller should testify before Congress.US Attorney General William Barr said Thursday during a press conference, "I have no objection to Robert Mueller personally testifying."
More

Top