(University of California - Irvine) In a new paper in Advanced Biosystems, researchers at the University of California, Irvine describe how they combined artificial intelligence, microfluidics and nanoparticle inkjet printing in a device that enables the examination and differentiation of cancers and healthy tissues at the single-cell level.
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President Trump refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses, and said he expects the election to "end up in the Supreme Court."
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(University of California - San Diego) A team of University of California researchers is working to improve telepresence robots and the algorithms that drive them to help children with disabilities stay connected to their classmates, teachers and communities. The effort is funded by a $1 million grant from the National Robotics Initiative at the National Science Foundation.
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(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have collaborated to create a universal design schema for navigation technologies to better support people with disabilities in getting from place to place. For this study, researchers worked with technology users with a broad and diverse range of disabilities to find similarities and differences in their navigation preferences. They then used those findings to create a schema that can inform the design of future technologies.
(University of California - Irvine) From cutting-edge research and clinical trials focused on cancer care to creating a new center devoted to protecting personal data privacy, University of California, Irvine scholars, scientists and physicians are blazing new paths to help change the world. And their impact keeps growing. In fiscal 2019-20, which ended June 30, UCI researchers received the most funding in campus history: $529 million in grants and contracts.
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The article has been mechanically translated into English by Google Translate from Russian and has not been edited.Переклад цього матеріалу українською мовою з російської було автоматично здійснено сервісом Google Translate, без подальшого редагування тексту.Bu məqalə Google Translate servisi vasitəsi ilə avtomatik olaraq rus dilindən azərbaycan dilinə tərcümə olunmuşdur.(University of California, Irvine)In this course, you will follow the sounds of American English, which might sometimes be misleading - both consonants and vowels.Studying this can assist you to speak extra clearly and ensure that others can perceive what you are saying.This course is helpful for those studying English who want to enhance the pronunciation of American English for better communication.Classes last 4 weeks on 3-four hours per week.The ultimate a part of the course focuses on communication abilities and interviews.Anyone can take this course for free and receive a diploma issued by the University of Pennsylvania.Training begins on December 27.three.(University of Pennsylvania)This course is designed for those whose English is a non-native language, and who are thinking about studying more about US media literacy.In this course, you'll explore varied kinds of media - corresponding to newspapers, magazines, tv, and social media.
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The article has been mechanically translated into English by Google Translate from Russian and has not been edited.Переклад цього матеріалу українською мовою з російської було автоматично здійснено сервісом Google Translate, без подальшого редагування тексту.Bu məqalə Google Translate servisi vasitəsi ilə avtomatik olaraq rus dilindən azərbaycan dilinə tərcümə olunmuşdur.(University of California, Irvine)In this course, you'll follow the sounds of American English, which might typically be deceptive - each consonants and vowels.The ultimate part of the course focuses on communication expertise and interviews.Anyone can take this course free of charge and receive a diploma issued by the University of Pennsylvania.Training begins on December 27.3.This course is designed that can assist you understand the phrases and abbreviations which might be commonly present in US medical institutions.Training starts on December 27.four.(University of Pennsylvania)This course is designed for those whose English is a non-native language, and who're interested in learning extra about US media literacy.In this course, you will discover various types of media - corresponding to newspapers, magazines, tv, and social media.
In an article in Brain, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and elsewhere report which brain regions must be intact in stroke survivors with aphasia if they are to perform well in a speech entrainment session, successfully following along with another speaker.One of the main causes of aphasia is stroke, the third leading cause of death in the U.S. About one in three stroke survivors develops aphasia.Patients with non-fluent aphasia speak in short, halting, telegraphic sentences and have trouble forming their words."Speech entrainment is asking the person to repeat in real time what they hear and see, or in other words to copy the speech of another speaker," said Leonardo Bonilha, M.D., Ph.D., who led the study.Bonilha is the SmartState Endowed Chair for Brain Imaging and an associate professor in the Department of Neurology at MUSC.Other team members include C-STAR collaborators from Johns Hopkins University and the University of California, Irvine.
If solving a Rubik's Cube wasn't hard enough already, you can now test your skills against the dextrous new artificial intelligence system created by OpenAI.In an 18-second video posted to the company's Twitter account Tuesday, OpenAI's new robot masters the cube quickly with a single, human-like robotic hand."This is an unprecedented level of dexterity for a robot, and is hard even for humans to do," OpenAI tweeted.Earlier this year, researchers at the University of California at Irvine unveiled an AI algorithm (sans robot arm) that can analyze more than 10 billion possible combinations to solve a Rubik's cube in just over a second.OpenAI's robot still hasn't perfected its technique, though.It only solves the cube 60% of the time, according to the company's blog.
If solving a Rubik's Cube wasn't hard enough already, you can now test your skills against the dextrous new artificial intelligence system created by Open AI.In an 18-second video posted to the company's Twitter account Tuesday, Open AI's new robot masters the cube quickly with a single, human-like robotic hand."This is an unprecedented level of dexterity for a robot, and is hard even for humans to do," OpenAI tweeted Tuesday.Earlier this year, researchers at the University of California, Irvine unveiled an AI algorithm (sans robot arm) that can analyze more than 10 billion possible combinations to solve a Rubik's cube in just over a second.Open AI's robot still hasn't perfected its technique, though.It only solves the cube 60% of the time, according to the company's blog.
Irvine, Calif. - Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new scanning transmission electron microscopy method that enables visualization of the electric charge density of materials at sub-angstrom resolution.With this technique, the UCI scientists were able to observe electron distribution between atoms and molecules and uncover clues to the origins of ferroelectricity, the capacity of certain crystals to possess spontaneous electric polarization that can be switched by the application of an electric field."This method is an advancement in electron microscopy - from detecting atoms to imaging electrons - that could help us engineer new materials with desired properties and functionalities for devices used in data storage, energy conversion and quantum computing," said team leader Xiaoqing Pan, UCI's Henry Samueli Endowed Chair in Engineering and a professor of both materials science & engineering and physics & astronomy.Employing a new aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope with a fine electron probe measuring half an angstrom and a fast-direct electron detection camera, his group was able to acquire a 2D raster image of diffraction patterns from a region of interest in the sample."With our new microscope, we can routinely form an electron probe as small as 0.6 angstrom, and our high-speed camera with angular resolution can acquire 4D STEM images with 512 x 512 pixels at greater than 300 frames per second," Pan said."Using this technique, we can see the electron charge distribution between atoms in two different perovskite oxides, non-polar strontium titanate and ferroelectric bismuth ferrite."
Irvine, Calif., Sept. 17, 2019 - An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of California, Irvine has developed a new technique for predicting the final size of a wildfire from the moment of ignition.Built around a machine learning algorithm, the model can help in forecasting whether a blaze is going to be small, medium or large by the time it has run its course - knowledge useful to those in charge of allocating scarce firefighting resources."A useful analogy is to consider what makes something go viral in social media," said lead author Shane Coffield, a UCI doctoral student in Earth system science."We can think about what properties of a specific tweet or post might make it blow up and become really popular - and how you might predict that at the moment it's posted or right before it's posted."It sounds extreme, but this scenario has become all too common in recent years in parts of the western United States as climate change has resulted in hot and dry conditions on the ground that can put a region at high risk of ignition.By feeding it climate data and crucial details about atmospheric conditions and the types of vegetation present around the starting point of a fire, the researchers could predict the final size of a blaze 50 percent of the time.
In the last decade, many commentators have expressed concern over how much time we spend using technology and its effects on mental health.This is particularly an issue with younger people, who can experience high rates of cyberbullying and can have adverse reactions to social media.However, teens themselves don’t necessarily agree, with surveys showing they are aware of the potential downsides of using technology but are also positive about its benefits.A new study from the University of California, Irvine, investigated this issue by tracking how much time teens spent on their phones and seeing if this was linked to worse mental health outcomes.And spoiler alert: The researchers didn’t find a link between technology use and mental health.The team surveyed over 2000 young people and then specifically tracked the smartphone use of nearly 400 subjects between the ages of 10 and 15 for two weeks.
Voters may form false memories after seeing fabricated news stories, especially if those stories align with their political beliefs, according to research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.The research was conducted in the week preceding the 2018 referendum on legalizing abortion in Ireland, but the researchers suggest that fake news is likely to have similar effects in other political contexts, including the U.S. presidential race in 2020."In highly emotional, partisan political contests, such as the 2020 US Presidential election, voters may 'remember' entirely fabricated news stories," says lead author Gillian Murphy of University College Cork."In particular, they are likely to 'remember' scandals that reflect poorly on the opposing candidate.'She and her colleagues, including leading memory researcher Elizabeth Loftus of the University of California, Irvine, recruited 3,140 eligible voters online and asked them whether and how they planned to vote in the referendum.The researchers then informed the eligible voters that some of the stories they read had been fabricated, and invited the participants to identify any of the reports they believed to be fake.
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