(University of Massachusetts Lowell) UMass Lowell research projects, ranging from developing new protective gear and sensors to ensure food and water are safe to advanced wireless communications, were recently awarded nearly $12 million in federal funding through the Fiscal Year 20 Defense Appropriations bill.
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) LOWELL, Mass. - A medical-device startup that aims to improve the health of pregnant women is the top winner in an annual pitch contest presented by the Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center (M2D2).
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Today, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced a new 'Future of Manufacturing' grant of $499,955 awarded to a collaboration of Massachusetts organizations, which will help the region's manufacturers pivot their operations to address emerging crises.
Fisheye lenses have been around for a long time and are used to capture panoramic views in a single shot. These ultra-wide-angle lenses are made from multiple pieces of curved glass that can distort light to produce the wide images. The challenge with traditional fisheye lenses is that the spherical design and multiple pieces of glass makes them bulky and … Continue reading
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Entrepreneurs developing medical devices and technologies to improve health outcomes will pitch their innovations to a panel of expert judges for the chance to share in $200,000 in in-kind resources to advance their work during a virtual event to be held on Thursday, Sept. 17 at 5 p.m. ET
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) A team of teachers and researchers led by UMass Lowell is developing a computer science curriculum for middle-schoolers to introduce the field to students from diverse backgrounds.
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Archana Kamal, UMass Lowell physics professor and internationally known expert on quantum information technologies, will co-present a free TEDx talk on the next quantum revolution as part of the TEDx "Breaking Barriers" webinar series.
(George Mason University) Brian L. Mark, Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, is set to receive $241,361 from the National Science Foundation for a project in which Mason will be responsible for the development of machine learning-based spectrum sensing techniques as a key component of the Intelligent Full Duplex Cognitive Radio Network (IFD-CRN) architecture.
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Entrepreneurs developing new medical devices and technologies for use in health care settings will learn how to get their innovations noticed during a free teleconference with industry leaders.The program "Demystifying Pathways to Innovation Partnerships with Health Systems" will be held virtually on Tuesday, Aug. 25 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) While K-12 schools across Massachusetts are looking at options for reopening this fall in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new report says public schools should also be looking at another important issue for their future: diversity.
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) More durable prosthetics and medical devices for patients and stronger parts for airplanes and automobiles are just some of the products that could be created through a new 3D printing technology invented by a UMass Lowell researcher.
Archana Kamal, an assistant professor in UMass Lowell's Department of Physics and Applied Physics, will use the Department of Energy grants to expand her research into the emerging field of quantum information science (QIS).The first grant, worth $1.5 million, was awarded through the Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences program.It will enable Kamal, who is leading the project, and partners including researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Boulder Laboratories to develop quantum technologies that can ultimately form the foundation for the next generation of computing and information processing, as well as other innovative technologies.The researchers will work on projects ranging from developing noise-resilient techniques for quantum computing to using quantum feedback for real-time error correction.Entangled states are special quantum states in which the information is encoded or hidden in correlations between two or more systems, such that each system can access only partial information or none at all."Using an analogy put forward by Prof. John Preskill of Caltech, an entangled system can be thought of as a book full of information.
- Eggshells can enhance the growth of new, strong bones needed in medical procedures, a team of UMass Lowell researchers has discovered.The technique developed by UMass Lowell could one day be applied to repair bones in patients with injuries due to aging, accidents, cancer and other diseases or in military combat, according to Assistant Prof. Gulden Camci-Unal, who is leading the study.Through the innovative process, crushed eggshells are inserted into a hydrogel mixture that forms a miniature frame to grow bone in the laboratory to be used for bone grafts.The research demonstrates that when eggshell particles - which are primarily made of calcium carbonate - are incorporated into the hydrogel mixture, they increase bone cells' ability to grow and harden, which could potentially result in faster healing.The process could also be used to help grow cartilage, teeth and tendons, she said.We have already filed a patent for it and are very excited about our results.
- An Air Force satellite launched into orbit this week via SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket carries an instrument built by UMass Lowell researchers to conduct experiments in space.Aside from temperature extremes, high vacuum and bombardment of cosmic rays, there are also extremely high-energy particles - dubbed "killer electrons" - that can pose a hazard to the health of astronauts and shorten the lifespan of orbiting satellites.These electrons are the subject of the research being conducted by UMass Lowell via the satellite."These electrons, traveling at nearly the speed of light, are capable of damaging the satellites' sensitive electronics and exposing astronauts to high doses of radiation," said UMass Lowell Physics Prof. Paul Song of the university's Space Science Lab.To help understand how these harmful electrons are generated and, consequently, how they can be mitigated, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) awarded a three-year contract to a team of UMass Lowell researchers led by Song to support the Air Force's Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) mission to the Earth's radiation belts.The DSX's objective is to explore the role of "wave-particle interaction" in the dynamics of these killer electrons.
- More than 300 leaders in educating the next generation of entrepreneurs are at UMass Lowell this week for the eighth annual Deshpande Symposium for Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Higher Education.The university - which runs three business incubators and a student entrepreneurship program - has presented the annual symposium with the Deshpande Foundation since 2012.The event was launched by UMass Lowell Chancellor Jacquie Moloney and the foundation's co-founder, technology entrepreneur Gururaj "Desh" Deshpande.Tours of local sites - the UMass Lowell Innovation Hub and Fabric Discovery Center; UMass Lowell's DifferenceMaker Central, home of the student entrepreneurship program; the IDEA Center at Middlesex Community College; Lowell Makes; and EforAll - were provided."We are extremely excited to once again welcome innovators and thought-leaders from more than 100 colleges and universities worldwide.With three days packed full of panel sessions, workshops, keynote presentations, an annual awards ceremony and extensive networking opportunities, the Deshpande Symposium offers a unique opportunity for attendees to share best practices, discuss new ideas and develop strategic collaborations to help advance innovation and entrepreneurship initiatives on their campuses," said Tom O'Donnell, senior director of innovation initiatives and director of the UMass Lowell Innovation Hub, who is among the conference's organizers, which also include representatives of the Deshpande Foundation, Arizona State University, the Burton D. Morgan Foundation, Houston Community College, Middlesex Community College, Queen's University, Rice University, University of Akron, University of North Carolina, VentureWell and Worcester Polytechnic Institute.
That was the point of one of the demonstrations Thursday at Verizon's 5G lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as a knee-high humanoid robot trundled up and down several steps and along the length of a wooden platform.It's a scale model of a person-size robot intended to help rescue people trapped in life-threatening situations."With 5G, the robot and the operator can communicate instantly," said Yan Gu, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.In the US, Verizon and AT, the nation's two biggest wireless carriers, have switched on mobile 5G networks in only a small handful of locations.Sprint just turned on its network in four cities at the end of May, right about the same time that wireless carrier EE became the UK's first 5G provider.There's a lot more to 5G than giving you instant gratification on your phone.
That was the point of one of the demonstrations Thursday at Verizon's 5G lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as a knee-high humanoid robot trundled up and down several steps and along the length of a wooden platform.It's a scale model of a person-size robot intended to help rescue people trapped in life-threatening situations."With 5G, the robot and the operator can communicate instantly," said Yan Gu, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.In the US, Verizon and AT, the nation's two biggest wireless carriers, have switched on mobile 5G networks in only a small handful of locations.Sprint just turned on its network in four cities this week, right about the same time that wireless carrier EE became the UK's first 5G provider.CNET's Jessica Dolcourt tested the performance of the Chicago network with a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G, and found it "insanely fast."
The use of self-tracking and personal surveillance technologies has grown considerably over the last decade.There are now apps to monitor people’s movement, health, mindfulness, sleep, eating habits and even sexual activity.For example, there are specific apps that allow parents to monitor their child’s GPS location, who they call, what they text, which apps they use, what they view online and the phone number of their contacts.As a bioethicist who specializes in the ethics of emerging technologies, I worry that such tracking technologies are transforming prudent parenting into surveillance parenting.Tracking apps are not primarily designed to keep children safe or help with parenting.They are designed to make money by gathering loads of information to be sold to other companies.
People with disabilities are experts at navigating a world that is not built for them - often by turning to technologies such as voice recognition devices and cochlear implants.But which technologies, and under what circumstances, truly enhance a person's ability to live the most meaningful, flourishing life?A new Hastings Center project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will explore how technologies can be used to promote or thwart flourishing through conversations with people with disabilities.The Art of Flourishing: Conversations on Disability and Technology will convene a series of six public events in New York City during 2019 to 2021, featuring a range of writers, scholars, artists, and thought leaders with disabilities to engage in conversation about how they use and why they refuse technology in their work and lives.Each conversation will focus on an art form, such as a dance or documentary, that explores how technology promotes or thwarts their flourishing and feeling at home in the world.The codirector is Joel Michael Reynolds, an assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and the Rice Family Fellow in Bioethics and the Humanities at The Hastings Center.
The event was attended by members of the UMass Lowell community along with more than 90 industry partners from across New England, including 22 that were recognized as Strategic Partners.Both top honorees Kronos and Raytheon collaborate with UMass Lowell in a variety of ways, from research and corporate education to internship and co-op opportunities for students.In addition, they work with the university to access important expertise and other resources, including the university's Core Research Facilities, that help them meet their business goals."Partnering with industry and preparing our students for careers with leaders like Raytheon and Kronos is part of our institutional DNA and is the spirit that has guided our university since it was founded nearly 125 years ago.While industries that fuel our economy have evolved, our determination and ability to meet their needs has only accelerated," Chancellor Jacquie Moloney said in addressing the honorees at the event."We are profoundly grateful to you for your support, your counsel and the chance to work with you to drive innovation, job creation and the economy of our region and the entire Commonwealth."
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