The company said employees can get their elderly family members vaccinated immediately.Infosys, Accenture, Capgemini, Reliance Industries, TVS Motor Company and ReNew Power have already announced that they would cover the vaccine cost for their employees and their family members
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Tory MPs have urged ministers to think again and pay NHS staff more than the controversial proposed 1% pay rise.More backbenchers broke cover on Monday to demand a rethink amid a backlash that has seen anger from unions and warnings of strikes by health workers in England.It came as Downing Street refused to rule out giving NHS staff a one-off Covid bonus for their work battling the pandemic, which has stretched the health service to its limit.Senior Tory MP Rob Halfon called for lower-paid health workers to get more than the 1% the government proposed to the NHS pay review body, while party colleague Andrew Percy suggested either a one-off payment or more recuperation time away from work.HuffPost UK understands that several more Tories are urging ministers behind the scenes to consider other options, including giving frontline staff who worked directly with Covid patients a bigger increase.7 Things The Government Spent Money On Instead Of A Pay Rise For NHS StaffSome Tory MPs are seeing their post bags fill up with constituents’ concerns about the proposed increase, which could end up being a real terms pay cut as the Office for Budget Responsibility predicts inflation to rise to 1.5% this year.Other backbenchers said they had not heard many concerns from voters.But amid mounting pressure on ministers, one Tory MP told HuffPost UK: “Like you – we are just waiting for the U-turn.”Boris Johnson’s official spokesperson refused to rule out a Covid bonus for NHS workers, which could potentially be modelled on Scotland’s £500 one-off payment to health and care staff.Asked twice on Monday to rule out a similar approach in England, they said:  “I’m not going to comment on speculation.“We’ve set out what we think is affordable. It’s now for the pay review body to look at that and look at the other evidence and come forward with their recommendation.”Labour criticised health secretary Matt Hancock for sending junior minister Helen Whately to answer an urgent question on the issue which was directed at him.During the debate Halfon asked: “Whilst absolutely recognising the economic constraints and the £2tn debt that our country owes, will she reconsider and at least propose a larger increase for lower-paid NHS workers?”"Whilst absolutely recognising the economic constraints... will she reconsider and at least propose a larger increase for lower-paid NHS workers?" asks Tory MP Robert Halfon Helen Whately says goverment will look at recommendations from pay review bodyhttps://t.co/wnoITFQKSbpic.twitter.com/XVQismiZDH— BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) March 8, 2021Percy, the Tory MP for Brigg and Goole, added to calls for a rethink.He said: “I’m proud to play a small role on the NHS frontline and this last most recent wave has been particularly brutal on nurses, healthcare assistants and, especially this time round, ambulance crews.“So can I urge [Whately] to, during this period of the review body considering it, open up discussions with the Treasury to look at what more we can do for our NHS staff, be that a one-off additional payment, be that other support, just giving people more rest and recuperation time?“We should do everything we can and make every effort to go further than what has so far been recommended.”Asking his urgent question, Labour’s shadow health secretary Jon Ashworth said: “I am grateful for the minister [Whately], but where is the secretary of state [Hancock]?“Why isn’t the secretary of state here to defend a budget that puts up tax for hard-working families and cuts pay for hard-working nurses?“The secretary of state has stood at that despatch box repeatedly waxing lyrical, describing NHS staff as heroes, saying they are the very best of us, and now he is cutting nurses’ pay.“Last summer, when asked by Andrew Marr if nurses deserved a real-terms pay rise, he replied: ‘Well, of course, I want to see people properly rewarded, absolutely’ – and yet now he is cutting nurses’ pay.”At a Downing Street coronavirus briefing, Johnson pointed towards the extra cash the NHS had received during the pandemic as he was asked about the 1% pay rise proposal.“I understand, of course that the whole sector has been under massive pressure and that’s why we are investing colossally on top of the £140bn annually that we give to the NHS, an extra £62bn to support the NHS,” he said.“I think is really crucial for the wellbeing of nurses across the country, in addition of course to the 12.8% pay increase that they got [in] the most recent round.”Related...Will The NHS Nurses Pay Row Deflate The Tories’ ‘Vaccine Bounce’?Organiser Of NHS Pay Protest In Manchester Fined £10,000 Under Covid RegulationsMinister Hints At U-Turn On 1% Pay Rise For NHS Staff
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A mutation called E484K appeared to help the variant, first found in South Africa, to evade antibodies produced by the vaccines, the authors said.
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Boris Johnson warned coronavirus cases could rise again after schools reopened on Monday.The prime minister also appeared to reject suggestions that his “roadmap” to lifting lockdown in England could be accelerated as Covid cases, deaths and hospitalisations all continue to fall.Johnson pointed towards Europe, where Covid cases have risen by around 9% in recent weeks, and warned that the UK has experienced similar increases after the continent in the past.It came as England’s deputy chief medical officer Jenny Harries said infections were now below 100 per every 100,000 people – levels last seen in September.Dr Harries says the #COVID19 case rate continues to fall across the country, but stresses the importance of continuing to follow preventative measures, adding "this is a level at which a new wave could easily take off again from"Live analysis: https://t.co/H4juU5gU1spic.twitter.com/2JvdmtN8tg— Sky News (@SkyNews) March 8, 2021Asked whether the encouraging data suggested lockdown could be lifted more quickly, the PM told a Downing Street briefing: “Of course I understand the urgency that people feel but we have to be driven by the data, we have to look at the rates of infection.“Don’t forget they are still very high by the standards of last year – we still have thousands of people in hospital with Covid.“We have seen, alas, in other European countries that the curve is going up again and we remember frankly what happened every time we’ve seen those upwards curves in our friends and neighbours that it is not too long after that that we see an increase in this country as well.“We’ve just got to remain prudent and the whole point about this road map is it is intended to be cautious but irreversible and we think we can do that because of the success of the vaccine rollout.“I think people would really rather trade some urgency and some haste in favour of security and certainty about those dates that we have set out.”Harries meanwhile warned that despite cases plummeting, they were at “a level at which a new wave could easily take off from again”.The deputy chief medical officer did however downplay suggestions schools may be forced to close again if new cases emerge.She told the briefing: “I think we can be very optimistic going forward.“The testing programme in schools should mean that the likelihood of a case going into a school and then numbers of children having to come out of education to isolate should be very significantly reduced.“There may be a very short period at the start of this programme where everybody gets used to it and a larger number of children come out of school and then it will settle down.“It is really important when observing this that people think through the next three to four weeks, not the first one or two.”Related...No.10 Clears Up Confusion On School Covid Tests After Minister's Mistake‘We Are Survivors’: A Year On The Covid Front Line For 6 British WomenOrganiser Of NHS Pay Protest In Manchester Fined £10,000 Under Covid Regulations
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The Electric Vaccine Vehicle will take road trips across the US in the coming months to show leaders how it can help.
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 Market HighlightsAccording to MRFR analysis, Meningococcal Vaccines Market has a demand for USD 172 Million doses in 2019.Further, the global estimated supply in 2019 is expected to be 203 Million doses.Despite broad and effective commitment from the global health community in meningitis A (MENA) vaccination in the meningitis belt, low manufacturing capacity and high prices across other meningococcal vaccine types have hindered access to these vaccines over the past several years.A more in-depth knowledge will benefit addressing these long-standing access issues and the development of the WHO global roadmap for overcoming meningitis by 2030.This is expected to set goals for disease control and vaccination for meningococcal meningitis on a global level.Request For Free Sample Copy :https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/8622 Regional AnalysisNeed for meningococcal vaccines is characterized by significant use outside of routine immunization: subnational use, immunization of special risk groups such as military personnel or travelers, private market use, or recommended but not-reimbursed immunization.In 2019, in addition to the 39 mostly HIC and meningitis belt countries that use meningococcal vaccines in national immunization programs NIPs, 27 countries use meningococcal vaccines only for special risk groups.National routine uses in 2019 accounts for approximately 100 million doses across all countries except for China.However, other countries in the African and Eastern Mediterranean region have indicated interest in introducing a multivalent, conjugate vaccine into routine National Immunization Program Schedule, but have strived to access these vaccines due to the high price and limited availability.Further, in 2018, 3.2 million doses were available in the Global stock, compared with 5 million doses that professionals forecast will be needed each year in the future, with more C- and W-containing vaccines needed to focus on the rising incidence of those serogroup globally.Overall, demand for MenACWY conjugate is expected to increase over the short- and mid-term, as HICs and MICs show a growing inclination for immunization strategies targeting multiple serogroups and as Hajj pilgrims increasingly use MenACWY conjugate due to withdrawal of polysaccharide products.SegmentationThe Global Meningococcal Vaccines Market has been segmented based on treatment type and end-user.
By vaccinating those in wealthy nations at the expense of the most vulnerable in poorer countries, the risk increases of dangerous variants emerging.
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The US CDC has released new guidance for those who have been fully vaccinated for COVID-19, explaining the latest advice for visiting those who are unvaccinated, when masks can be taken off, and more. It’s a long-anticipated update, with rising concerns that as America’s vaccinated population increases, uncertainty among families and extended families about just what sort of social distancing … Continue reading
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Danish biotechnology company records strong preclinical results for its Covid-19 vaccine candidate, ABNCoV2
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The global vaccine storage & packaging market size is expected to reach USD 43.8 billion by 2027 according to a new study by Polaris Market Research.The report “Vaccine Storage & Packaging Market Share, Size, Trends, Industry Analysis Report, By Type (Storage [Storage Equipment (Refrigerator, Freezer, Others), Service (Warehouse Storage, Transportation)], Packaging [By Packaging Material (Vaccine Bags, Vials, Ampoules, Corrugated boxes, Others), By Packaging Level (Primary, Secondary, Tertiary)]; By End-Use (Retailers, Forwarding & Clearing Agents, Distributors and Others); By Regions; Segment Forecast, 2020-2027” gives a detailed insight into current market dynamics and provides analysis on future market growth.It also helps to prevent vaccines from degradation.Moreover, vaccine storage equipment has a huge application in medical laboratories, biotechnology companies, pharmacy stores, blood banks, hospitals & other health care institutes.The growing government venture on vaccination programs will offer lucrative opportunities for the growth of the global market.The issues including in-house storage and packaging abilities and budget barriers faced by biopharmaceutical organizations, government centers, and academic institutions are estimated to drive the development of the global market.
The competitive landscape of the  U.S. vaccines market is highly fragmented  with the presence of several local and international players, says Transparency Market Research.Some of the prominent players in the U.S. vaccine market are GlaxoSmithKline plc, Sanofi Pasteur SA, CSL Limited, Johnson & Johnson, MedImmune, LLC, Pfizer, Inc., and Astellas Pharma Inc.To maintain a leading position in the market, the key players are making notable investments in the research and development activity.The strong growth in the region is mainly due to the easy availability of vaccine owing to presence of several key manufacturers in the region.Apart from this, favorable government policies for manufacturing and sales of vaccine are another factors expected to drive the  U.S. vaccine market.Some of them are malaria, dengue, tuberculosis, chikangunya, influenza.Apart from this, growth of the U.S vaccine market is attributed to increase in public and private funding for research and development of  several advanced vaccine.Foremost,  vaccines have helped to control prevalence of disease like polio, small pox, and chicken guniya.
According to IMARC Group’s latest report, titled “Meningococcal Vaccines Market: Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2020-2025,” the global meningococcal vaccines market to exhibit strong growth during the next five years.The meningococcal vaccine includes a biological substance formulated to prevent meningitis that occurs when the liquid surrounding the brain and spinal cords become infected.The meningococcal vaccines can broadly be categorized into conjugate, polysaccharide, and subcapsular meningococcal vaccines.They are widely administered to infants, children and adults to immunize them against invasive ailments and meningococcal bacteria.Once the vaccine is dispensed, antibodies are formed to fight the bacteria and create an immune response to preclude the infection in the future.Get a PDF Sample for more detailed market insights: https://www.imarcgroup.com/meningococcal-vaccines-market/requestsampleMarket TrendsThe growing prevalence of meningococcal diseases is primarily driving the market for meningococcal vaccines.Furthermore, the increasing health consciousness among the masses and the rising adoption of routine immunization are also positively influencing the market.The meningococcal vaccine helps in preventing the disease and minimizing the long-term effects, such as neurological damage, temporary or permanent deafness, and loss of vision and motor skills.
Every Monday, we’ll answer your questions on Covid-19 and health in a feature published online. You can submit a question here.  HuffPost UK reader Pete asked: “Can you catch Covid in a busy park?As the weather warms up, parks are going to get busier again – especially since Boris Johnson’s roadmap states people will be able to sit with one other person from March 8 – and five other people from March 29. So as we, once again, have picnics with our pals on the grass, are we putting ourselves at risk? “We know this virus transmits during close contact with people,” says Dr Julian Tang, clinical virologist at the University of Leicester. If a park is very crowded, with less than two metre spacing between groups, where no masks are worn, “the virus can still potentially transmit”, he says. “If most people have been vaccinated, and there is a strong breeze and strong sunlight, this risk will be less.”Submit a coronavirus health question to HuffPost UK.Paul Hunter, professor in Medicine, at the Norwich School of Medicine, University of East Anglia, adds that the evidence is that transmission of Covid outside is much lower – about 19-fold less – than transmission indoors.“There was also no obvious outbreak associated with the very crowded beaches that we saw last spring and summer,” he adds. “That does not mean that such transmission is impossible but it will be unlikely to play an important role in the spread of the epidemic.”The highest risk of transmission is during face-to-face conversation between unmasked people, less than one metre apart, if there is less wind and less sunlight, says Dr Tang. In these conditions, the virus can pass quickly between individuals at this distance through the air.“Standing close to someone not from your household or support bubble face to face whilst talking still should be avoided,” says Prof Hunter. “But sitting near other people, especially if more than two metres apart whilst not socialising with them, would be a very low risk.”Prof Keith Neal, professor of the Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, University of Nottingham, says the benefits of exercise and vitamin D are much greater than the risks of not going outside at all. When lying down especially, the sunbathing droplets you breathe out will “go virtually nowhere”, he says. Closing parks isn’t an option for local and national government, adds Prof Neal, as “forcing people into places where distancing is less practical”.  So, while going to a busy park may not be super risky, you should still abide by distancing measures. Professor Jonathan Reid, director of Bristol Aerosol Research Centre, says there have been “very few recognised cases” of transmission outside and only when people were “not observing the guidance on physical distancing”. “It is also important people still recognise the risks of any indoor spaces they might use when visiting an outdoor venue, such as toilets, changing rooms and cafes,” he adds. If a park looks, or becomes, too crowded, you can go somewhere else. “The important thing to remember is that no one who gets vaccinated at the moment is routinely tested for an antibody response, so you don’t actually know if you might be one of the few that has not responded to the vaccine,” sats Dr Tang. “This non-response rate is typically around 5-10% across all vaccines.“Despite the rapid vaccine rollout, people still need to be aware of potential transmission risks – particularly with the circulation of multiple potentially more transmissible, partial vaccine escape virus variants – which includes crowded outdoor situations also.”Experts are still learning about Covid-19. The information in this story is what was known or available at the time of publication, but guidance could change as scientists discover more about the virus. To keep up to date with health advice and cases in your area, visit gov.uk/coronavirus and nhs.uk.Related...The Risk Of Catching Covid From A Runner's BreathYes, Covid Affects People Differently, Even In The Same HouseholdThe Unrivalled Joy Of Lazing In Parks Is A Positive Lockdown TakeawayYou've Had The Vaccine, So Can You Hug Your Grandkids Now?
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An estimated 4,300 people at the Oakland Coliseum received a suboptimal dosage of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on March 1, KTVU reported.
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US intelligence officials believe this effort to undermine the Pfizer vaccine is a way to bolster the status of Russia's vaccine.
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Every vaccination helps the public at large, but we live in a world where getting the COVID-19 vaccine is both encouraged and hotly debated.
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Four online publications linked to Russian intelligence agencies have been spreading false or misleading information about coronavirus vaccines, The Wall Street Journal reported, citing an official at the US Department of State’s Global Engagement Center. The sites, identified as New Eastern Outlook, Oriental Review, News Front, and Rebel Inside, have emphasized the side effects of Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine as well as other western pharma companies’ vaccines, stoking concerns about whether the vaccines are effective or had been rushed through the US approval process, the WSJ said. The sites don’t have large audiences, but officials said their false stories are often picked up and circulated by international media. They typically... Continue reading…
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Education secretary Gavin Williamson has hinted ministers could U-turn on NHS pay, amid a fierce backlash to government’s “insulting” offer of a 1% hike. Chancellor Rishi Sunak offered the tiny increase to hard-pressed staff like NHS nurses, who have been on the frontline in the country’s battle against Covid.Now, Williamson has stressed the move, which is being examined by an independent pay review board, is “part of a process”, suggesting the government could rethink the rise. Shown a video of prime minister Boris Johnson and Sunak clapping for carers during the pandemic, as hospitals and care homes were struggling to cope with the pandemic, BBC One presenter Andrew Marr put it to Williamson that the minuscule hike was “frankly an insult” to staff. “What we are having to deal with is incredibly challenging economic circumstances,” the education secretary said. “We have put forward a proposal. We have put forward what we believe that we can afford and it’s part of a process and that will sort of be looked at.“But really, our focus is on making sure we recover from this pandemic.”Pressed on whether ministers could U-turn, he added: “We’ve stated that this is very much part of the process – what the government has put forward has been passed to an independent review.”Asked if he was among those who clapped, Williamson said: “Like everyone, I went out there to clap.” Unions, NHS staff and members of the public have reacted with anger to the pay offer. They had been expecting a 2.1% rise, after Tory MPs voted through a set increase last year. The British Medical Association (BMA), the Royal College of Midwives, the Royal College of Nursing and Unison have said in a letter to ministers that the pay deal “fails the test of honesty and fails to provide staff who have been on the very frontline of the pandemic the fair pay deal they need”.The letter adds: “Our members are the doctors, nurses, midwives, porters, healthcare assistants and more, already exhausted and distressed, who are also expected to go on caring for the millions of patients on waiting lists, coping with a huge backlog of treatment as well as caring for those with Covid-19.” Speaking earlier to Sky News’ Sophy Ridge, Williamson was also asked whether a U-turn was likely on the NHS pay recommendation.He said there had “quite rightly” been “record increases” going to doctors and nurses, but that the country faced “a much more difficult economic period” after the economy had shrunk by 10% during the pandemic.Pressed on possible NHS strikes over the pay move, he added: “No-one wants to see industrial action and I’m certain the Royal College of Nursing wouldn’t want to see industrial action.”Shadow foreign secretary Lisa Nandy said it was “reprehensible” for ministers not to recommend putting NHS pay up by more than 1%.The senior Labour politician told Sky News” “The government, to be clear, is not planning a pay rise.“That is a real-terms pay cut because it doesn’t keep up with inflation and for nurses to be offered a pay cut is just reprehensible in our view.“In the NHS long-term plan, the government budgeted for a 2.1% pay rise – that is what nurses were promised and last year they legislated for that in order to give nurses a cast-iron guarantee that after years of seeing their real-terms pay fall, that the Government would finally reverse that decision and start to see their pay increase.“We think they ought to go into these negotiations at a bare minimum of honouring that promise of a 2.1% (increase) and then consider what more they can offer to our NHS staff who have done so much to put their families and themselves at risk every day going into work – some of them have died.”Related...7 Things The Government Spent Money On Instead Of A Pay Rise For NHS Staff‘Let’s Bloody Show Them The Money’: Amanda Holden Weighs In On NHS 1% Pay Rise RowWill The NHS Nurses Pay Row Deflate The Tories’ ‘Vaccine Bounce’?
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Nigel Farage has announced he is stepping down as leader of Reform UK so that he can dedicate more time to fighting young people and the “increasing influence” of Chinese communists.And he’s going to plant a few trees while he’s at it.In a ten-minute video released on Twitter, he declared Brexit a success and said he had “actually achieved what I set out to do” and that “after 30 years, that’s enough of active politics”.“But I’m not retiring, oh no goodness gracious me no,” Farage added.Instead of Brexit, Farage said he will now concentrate on “lots of other things that I want to fight for and campaign for”.Top of his list is the “increasing influence in the Chinese Communist Party over our whole way of life”, he said, adding: “Once again, effectively, the British establishment has sold out to it. I think that’s a big education campaign and I will fight for that.”This is why I’m standing down as leader of Reform UK.I will continue to play my part through the media, social media and new projects.My thanks go out to the many millions that helped change the course of history forever. pic.twitter.com/F9m0sCAW57— Nigel Farage (@Nigel_Farage) March 6, 2021He then took aim at younger people who might not share the views of a 56-year-old Eurosceptic, saying: “The indoctrination of our children at school. And that starts from the age of seven or eight and goes all the way through to university. We’re not teaching young people critical thinking, they’ve been propagandised politically. “And I think in many cases, encouraged to hate this country and everything it’s ever stood for.”In a surprise twist, Farage also said he would be concentrating on green issues.He said: “And there are some environmental causes I care strongly about such as the health of our oceans and... let’s get planting trees!”Didn’t Nigel Farage quit politics when he finally stopped drawing his EU salary last year? He’s not got a job in British politics to quit from because voters rejected him each of the seven times he tried to become an MP. https://t.co/g3AhNNAEMc— David Lammy (@DavidLammy) March 6, 2021Nigel Farage standing down as leader of party most people didn’t know existed— John Crace (@JohnJCrace) March 6, 2021Farage, who as leader of the eurosceptic UK Independence Party (UKIP) applied pressure on the government to hold the 2016 EU referendum, said the Brexit Party had helped the Conservatives “come to their senses” and chose Boris Johnson as their leader with a pro-Brexit agenda.“The final outcome (of Brexit) has cut off Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK and treated our fisherman terribly, but we are out and there is no going back,” he said.“Already, in terms of the vaccine rollout and trade deals around the world, we are seeing the benefits of Brexit and the EU itself turn into a laughing stock.”Farage said he now felt he could do as much to shift public opinion through media and social media as he could as a campaigning party leader.  He will be replaced as Reform UK leader by Richard Tice.Related...Nigel Farage Gets Fact-Checked By The Home Office Over 'Incorrect' Migrant Covid ClaimsNigel Farage Supporters 'Least Likely To Take Up Covid Vaccine' Among Voters
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