Tim Cook is getting the rock star treatment on his first trip to India.Paparazzi have tailed him since he began the visit Wednesday in the financial capital Mumbai, keeping Cook s bodyguards busy as the Apple Inc. chief executive officer toured the city s most famous temple.Just about every step has has been reported, photographed and tweeted.Cook attended a dinner in Mumbai hosted by Bollywood film star Shah Rukh Khan, spent time with Anant Ambani -- son of India s richest man Mukesh Ambani -- and met Tata Group Chairman Cyrus Mistry, whose sprawling conglomerate includes stores selling iPhones.He also met the top brass for Vodafone Group Plc in India.Cook is expected in New Delhi as early as Friday and may meet Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi.The administration is currently reviewing Apple s application to open retail stores in Asia s third-largest economy.As China s market becomes more saturated and people across the globe upgrade their smartphones less frequently, Apple, Samsung Electronics Co. and other vendors are keen to sell to India s middle class, which is projected to quadruple to 200 million by 2020.The challenge for Apple is that its products are beyond the reach of many in India, where most people live on less than $3.10 a day, according to World Bank data.Apple doesn t feature in the top 10 in terms of smartphone market share in the South Asian nation, according to Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Simon Chan.
European Round Table of Industrialists believe that the reasons for the fact that Europe needs to work and stay together are stronger than ever. Organizational members include Machine CEO Henrik Ehrnrooth, Chairman of the Nokia Board of Directors and Mr. Siilasmaa. Some of the largest European companies as leaders, we call upon the creation of a new trust towards the European Union as a first step to solve our common challenges. Only by approaching a uniform common problems we can bring about the changes needed to improve working conditions and living in Europe, especially for young people and future generations, company executives say. Signatories: ERT members Chairman Benoît Potier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Air Liquide The vice-presidents Nils S. Andersen, Group CEO of AP Møller-Mærsk Vittorio Colao, Chief Executive, Vodafone Group Membership Jean-Paul Agon, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of L'Oréal José María Álvarez-Pallet López, Executive Chairman of Telefónica Paulo Azevedo, Chairman and Co-CEO of Sonae Ben van Beurden, Chief Executive Officer of Royal Dutch Shell Kurt Bock, Chairman of the Board of Executive Directors of BASF Jean-François van Boxmeer, Chairman and CEO of Heineken Carlo Bozotti, President and CEO of STMicroelectronics Svein Richard Brandtzæg, President and CEO of Norsk Hydro Ton Büchner, CEO & Chairman of the Board of Management of AkzoNobel Paul Bulcke, Chief Executive Officer of Nestlé Pierre-André de CHALENDAR, Chairman & CEO of Saint-Gobain Jean-Pierre Clamadieu, Chairman of the Executive Committee and CEO, Solvay Iain Conn, Chief Executive of Centrica Ian Davis, Chairman of Rolls-Royce Rodolfo De Benedetti, Chairman CIR Claudio Descalza, Chief Executive Officer of Eni Wolfgang Eder, Chairman and CEO of voestalpine Henrik Ehrnrooth, President and CEO of KONE John Elkann, Chairman of FCA Christoph Franz, Chairman of the Board F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ignacio S. Galán, Chairman & CEO of Iberdrola Zsolt Hernád, Chairman and CEO of MOL Heinrich Hiesinger, Chairman of the Executive Board of ThyssenKrupp Timotheus Höttges, Chief Executive Officer of Deutsche Telekom Frans van Houten, President and Chief Executive Officer of Royal Philips Pablo Isla, Inditex Chairman and CEO Leif Johansson, Chairman Ericsson Joe Kaeser, President and Chief Executive Officer of Siemens Bruno Lafont, Co-Chairman of the Board of Directors LafargeHolcim Thomas Leysen, Chairman of the Board Umicore Martin Lundstedt, President and CEO of Volvo Group Bill McDermott, CEO of SAP Nancy McKinstry, CEO and Chairman Executive Board Wolters Kluwer Gérard Mestrallet, Chairman & CEO engie Lakshmi N. Mittal, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ArcelorMittal Dimitri Papalexopoulos, Managing Director of Titan Cement Jan du Plessis, Chairman of Rio Tinto Patrick Pouyanné, Chief Executive Officer of TOTAL Norbert Reithofer, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of BMW Group Stéphane Richard, Chairman & CEO of Orange Kasper Rorsted, Chief Executive Officer of Henkel Güler Sabanci, Sabanci Holding Chairman Risto Siilasmaa, Chairman of Nokia Tony Smurfit, Group Chief Executive of Smurfit Kappa Group Ulrich Spiesshofer, Chief Executive Officer of ABB Carl-Henric Svanberg, Chairman of BP Johannes Teyssen, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of E.ON Jacob Wallenberg, Chairman of Investor AB
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Most of the opposition Labour Party voted with the conservative majority to advance the bill to the House of Lords, while the opposition Scottish National Party, citing concerns about privacy and civil rights, voted against it.Many of the surveillance techniques -- such as scooping up the metadata of communications and using malware to gain access to the computers and mobile phones of terrorism suspects --- have already been in use by U.K. spy agencies and the law now gives them explicit authority.The legislation was sharply criticized by global technology companies when it was first proposed last year.Apple Inc. Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook warned of "dire consequences" if the bill passed with language weakening encryption.Meanwhile, Vodafone Group Plc, the U.K. mobile company, said it was worried about the cost of modifying its systems to comply with the new law and that allowing the government to hack into its network might compromise its stability and integrity.The version of the bill passed Tuesday makes clear that companies aren t required to build backdoors to their encryption and will only be required to remove such code in response to a government request if doing so is technically feasible and not unduly expensive.When Apple was battling with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation over breaking the encryption on the iPhone of the attacker in a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, the company said it would require a dedicated team of engineers working for at least a month to figure out how to crack it or modify the lock screen to allow unlimited attempts to open the device.If this U.K. bill becomes law, it would be up to a British judge to decide if that kind of effort met the technical feasibility and reasonable cost test.The bill also makes clear that the government will likely reimburse communications companies, including mobile operators, for the cost of complying with the new legal obligations, such as the requirement to retain records of all the websites its customers visit for at least a year.Civil rights and privacy advocates have also opposed the bill and the revisions the government made in the final version hasn t mollified them."Minor botox has not fixed this bill," Shami Chakrabarti, the director of the civil rights group Liberty, said when the final version was introduced in March.The House of Lords will now consider the proposed law, known as the Investigatory Powers Bill.Anderson will issue a report on the bill -- including an opinion on whether the bulk surveillance powers the government is asking for are justified -- in time for the Lords final vote on the bill sometime in the fall.
Most of the opposition Labour Party voted with the conservative majority to advance the bill to the House of Lords, while the opposition Scottish National Party, citing concerns about privacy and civil rights, voted against it.Many of the surveillance techniques -- such as scooping up the metadata of communications and using malware to gain access to the computers and mobile phones of terrorism suspects --- have already been in use by U.K. spy agencies and the law now gives them explicit authority.The legislation was sharply criticized by global technology companies when it was first proposed last year.Apple Inc. Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook warned of "dire consequences" if the bill passed with language weakening encryption.Meanwhile, Vodafone Group Plc, the U.K. mobile company, said it was worried about the cost of modifying its systems to comply with the new law and that allowing the government to hack into its network might compromise its stability and integrity.The version of the bill passed Tuesday states that companies can only be asked to remove encryption that they themselves have put in place and if doing so is technically feasible and not unduly expensive.This provision would allow a company ordered to break encryption to appeal to the Secretary of State that doing so would pose a prohibitively costly or otherwise damaging challenge.The bill states that the government will likely reimburse communications companies, including mobile operators, for the cost of complying with the new legal obligations, such as the requirement to retain records of all the websites its customers visit for at least a year.Civil rights and privacy advocates have also opposed the bill and the revisions the government made in the final version haven t mollified them."Minor botox has not fixed this bill," Shami Chakrabarti, the director of the civil rights group Liberty, said when the final version was introduced in March.When Apple was battling with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation over breaking the encryption on the iPhone of the attacker in a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, the company said it would require a dedicated team of engineers working for at least a month to figure out how to crack it or modify the lock screen to allow unlimited attempts to open the device.If this U.K. bill becomes law, it would be up to a British judge to decide if that kind of effort met the technical feasibility and reasonable cost test.The House of Lords will now consider the proposed law, known as the Investigatory Powers Bill.
Vodafone Group PLC plans to add pay TV to its New Zealand operations through a 3.44 billion New Zealand dollar US$2.44 billion merger of its local unit with Sky Network Television, as the world s big telecommunications companies continue to pivot toward TV and online video.Russell Stanners, currently chief executive of Vodafone New Zealand Ltd., will head the new business.The move follows a trend by telecommunications companies to do deals that will help them bundle media content into their offerings to differentiate themselves from competitors and reduce customer churn.While U.K.-based Vodafone, the world s second-largest mobile carrier, behind China Mobile Ltd., once focused on selling only mobile-phone subscriptions, it has been investing heavily in recent years in adding fixed lines for cable television and broadband, enabling it to sell combo packages with both wireless and fixed line services.Sky is the leading pay TV operator in New Zealand with more than 830,000 subscribers serving almost half of all New Zealand households.However, profits fell last financial year as it ramped up investment in content deals to try to compete with rivals, and the company surprised the market in May by forecasting subscribers will be down the second half of this fiscal year as many customers who had signed up for last year s Rugby World Cup decided not to renew their contracts.
BT, a 170-year-old former state-run monopoly known as British Telecom, lays down most of the U.K. s telecoms lines and makes a hefty chunk of its revenue through its Openreach division by connecting up the country s copper wire and high-speed fiber-optic cable network.For years, BT has faced calls for increased regulatory pressure on the division by rival operators which lease the network on a wholesale basis to reach their own customers.Ofcom says Openreach, which recorded 40% of BT s operating profit in the year to end of March 2015, needs to take its own decisions on budget, investment and strategy.Responding to concerns over competition, investment and service across the network, Ofcom said BT must allow easier access to its cables for other operators to build up their own fiber networks.BT competes with companies such as Vodafone Group PLC, Sky and Liberty Global LBTYA 0.90 % PLC s Virgin Media in the rapidly-developing market for combined telephony, internet broadband and media services.Ofcom announced last year that it was considering whether BT should be split up, based on promoting benefits to consumers and businesses.
NEW DELHI—A new wave of affordable smartphones has brought hundreds of millions of Indians online for the first time, giving them access to better education, jobs and entertainment.Nestlé SA, NSRGY 0.27 % Coca-Cola Co. KO 0.64 % and others selling consumer products to India s 1.2 billion people say that as their poorest customers start spending on smartphone data, they have fewer pennies left over for snacks, sodas and shampoo.We are competing for the consumer s wallet not just with beverages and other impulse categories, but also with data services on smartphones, said Venkatesh Kini, the president of Coca-Cola in India and Southwest Asia.Indians generally can t afford monthly data plans, and only get online when they have some spare change.For a quick peek at Google or Facebook, for example, Vodafone Group VOD -0.06 % PLC offers data plans for as little as 15 cents at a time, roughly the same price consumers pay for a bag of salted chips.There was a time when kids would come here and blow their pocket money on chips and chocolate, said Anup Kapoor, who runs a mom-and-pop grocery shop in New Delhi.
Facebook Inc. s head of sales in France, Italy, Iberia and the Benelux, will leave the company as part of a European management reshuffle, according to two people familiar with the matter.Paola Bonomo, who s based in Milan, will leave the company Sept. 16 after working for Facebook since 2015, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the resignation hasn t been made public yet.A representative for Facebook wasn t immediately available for comment.Bonomo, southern Europe global marketing solutions director, previously held positions at Vodafone Group Plc, EBay Inc. and McKinsey & Co. Inc.
Funds will also be used to expand spectrum portfolio.British telecom major Vodafone Group has pumped $7.2bn into its Indian subsidiary as the competition heats up with the entry of new player Reliance Jio.The investment comes ahead of the spectrum auction in the world's second-biggest mobile phone market.Vodafone India chief executive officer Sunil Sood said: This reaffirms our commitment to India.With this, we will focus on right-sizing our spectrum portfolio and deployment of 4G and 5G technology."In November last year, the group invested Rs 13,000 crore $1.6bn in the Indian unit for network rollout.
Vodafone Group VOD 0.22 % PLC intends to work with an Iranian internet-service provider to help improve its local networks, becoming the first big Western firm to jump into Iran after the U.S. moved earlier this month to make it easier for companies to do business in the Islamic Republic.telecommunications carrier said Tuesday that it plans to assist Iran s HiWEB, a small, privately owned operator, in modernizing infrastructure and expanding landline and mobile internet services for personal and business customers.Vodafone didn t disclose details, including any planned investment in the venture.Vodafone isn t the first—or even the biggest—Western company to enter Iran after world powers started lifting global sanctions earlier this year, following Iran s agreement to curb its nuclear program.Earlier this month, the U.S. Treasury loosened restrictions on Iran s ability to trade in the U.S. dollar, and widened the pool of potential business partners in Iran for non-American investors.Washington ruled that non-American investors can become partners with Iranian entities even if those entities are still on the U.S. sanctions list, as long as the entities weren t controlling shareholders in any new venture.
India s largest operator, Bharti Airtel, is to acquire the Indian mobile business of Norwegian carrier Telenor, in an apparent move to counter the impact of disruptive pricing by new entrant Reliance Jio Infocomm.The deal is the latest among carriers aiming to consolidate their operations in India.Vodafone Group confirmed recently that it was in talks with Indian operator Idea Cellular for a merger, while earlier Reliance Communications entered into an agreement in September to merge its wireless business with Aircel, a smaller mobile operator.The consolidation could help users as larger companies will be able to use spectrum more efficiently and invest in new technologies quickly, according to analysts.A unit of the large Reliance Industries with deep pockets, Jio upset the plans of entrenched rivals by offering 4G services free for close to six months, garnering 100 million customers in the bargain.The company, which plans to start charging from April 1, has indicated it will continue to undercut its rivals.
RCS is the next standard of texting, and Google's rounding up the carriers to adhere to the universal platform.Following Sprint, Rogers, and Telenor, four new telecommunications providers will now support Google’s RCS Jibe platform: Vodafone Group, Globe Telecom, Orange, and Deutsche Telekom.To enforce a seamless experience on these networks, Google is also rebranding Messenger, the default texting application on some Android devices, to Android Messages.RCS, or Rich Communication Services, is the follow-up to SMS and MMS.RCS lets users send higher-quality picture messages, participate in group chat, share their current location, and initiate video calls.It essentially brings texting up to speed with features available on instant messaging services like Facebook Messenger.
Vodafone Group PLC said Monday that it would merge its embattled Indian business with a local rival, a $24 billion move that would create India’s largest wireless company and could strengthen the British telecommunication company’s standing in a cutthroat market.Vodafone and Idea Cellular Ltd., which are respectively India’s No.3 mobile operators, would overtake Bharti Airtel Ltd. as the country’s leading carrier.
p The telco giant took a huge hit from it’s business in India.The Vodafone Group has announced a year-to-end-March loss of €6.1 billion following a huge write down of its business in India.The worlds second largest mobile provider, which operates in 26 different countries, reported that it had also had an underwhelming year in the UK.However despite these losses, the company’s share price actually increased more than 3% thanks in part to the company’s confident forecast for the year ahead.Vodafone has forecast a growth in earnings and a jump in cash flow for 2017 due to a stabilising revenue and decreased spending.Chief Executive Vittorio Colao said :”We expect to sustain our momentum in the coming financial year, generating free cash flow of around 5.0 billion euros.”
Vodafone group is enlisting the help of UK outfit Lime Microsystems to develop software-defined radio platform that supports its open RAN ambitions.Lime aims to commoditize the RAN such that it is open to all developers in much the same way has the PC platform has been for years.As the virtualization era progresses it has become clear that the old paradigm of closed, proprietary networking technology is over and a much more open environment is required.Lime thinks that software-defining the RAN is a key part of this.Vodafone has been one of the most vocal operators in demanding the industry gets a move on with virtualization and all the utopian goodness it promises the industry.It is also one of the operators showing a desire to become less dependent on the big networking vendors and do more of the R heavy lifting itself, as indicated by its recent tech day.
The CEOs of many large European operators around the continent have signed an open letter calling for ‘genuine’ reform of the EU with regards to spectrum policy ahead of the rollout of 5G networks.Telecoms ministers are due to meet in Tallinn, Estonia tomorrow (18th July, 2017) for a meeting on the conditions needed for the successful deployment of 5G technology in Europe.Ahead of the meeting, the CEOs of Deutsche Telekom, GSMA, KPN, Orange, Telecom Italia, Telefónica, Telekom Austria, Telenor Group, Telia Company, and Vodafone Group have signed an open letter from the GSMA which calls for changes in spectrum policy across Europe.The concerns regard current discussions about the spectrum elements of the proposed European Electronic Communication Code.“We see this as an unprecedented chance to champion genuine spectrum policy reform, that will position Europe as a true global leader,” the signatories wrote in the letter.Specifically, the signatories emphasise the need for:
While speculation continues to swirl over the bidding for its fixed-line network business, Hutchison Telecommunications Hong Kong is looking to spark fresh growth at its mobile operation by offering international roaming for as low as HK$15 a day.Mobile arm Three Hong Kong will launch its so-called Roam-in-Command programme this Friday, providing discounted data roaming service in six countries in Europe and 10 countries across Asia-Pacific, as well as packages that combine the United States, Canada, mainland China, Taiwan and Macau.Hutchison Telecom’s aggressive strategy may help kick new life into the moribund roaming business of the city’s three incumbent mobile network operators, which include HKT and SmarTone Telecommunications.Kenny Koo, the director of roaming and service development at Three Hong Kong, said the operator is drawing on its close industry alliances “to tailor value-for-money roaming packages that offer extensive overseas coverage”.Those partnerships include those with Japan’s NTT Docomo, British multinational telecommunications giant Vodafone Group, Asia-based mobile alliance Conexus and the rest of the Three Group businesses under Hutchison Telecom parent CK Hutchison Holdings.Three has mobile network operations in Austria, Britain, Denmark, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Macau, Sri Lanka, Sweden and Vietnam.
The IoT market is one of today’s hottest and Vodafone has attacked it by launching a new service allowing consumers to connect home devices to the Group’s own IoT network.V by Vodafone not only supports the connection of IoT products but also offers and range of new offerings, including a connected car dongle, a 4G security camera, a pet location and activity tracker and a bag location tracker.Vodafone Group chief executive, Vittorio Colao, said: “The Internet of Things is already beginning to transform how businesses operate.Over the next decade, the expansion of IoT into consumer markets will bring about an equally dramatic shift in how people manage their daily lives, at home and in their leisure time.”He said that the new service would offer users more choice.“V by Vodafone” makes it simple to connect a wide range of IoT-enabled devices, helping customers keep everyone and everything that matters to them safe and secure” he added.
Vodafone is hoping to leverage its favourable market position and prior experience with enterprise solutions for the launch of a new brand of consumer IoT products.The brand is called ‘V by Vodafone’ and devices will be connected to the operator’s network straight out the box to simplify things for the consumer.“The Internet of Things is already beginning to transform how businesses operate,” said Vodafone group chief executive Vittorio Colao.“Over the next decade, the expansion of IoT into consumer markets will bring about an equally dramatic shift in how people manage their daily lives, at home and in their leisure time.”Some of the products available include a connected car dongle, a 4G security camera, a pet location tracker, an activity tracker, and a bag location tracker.All of the devices will be linked by the dedicated ‘V by Vodafone’ smartphone app to provide customers with a “single and intuitive” overview of all IoT-enabled products registered to their account.
UK operator group Vodafone is having a good few months, culminating in the first upward revision of its organic EBITDA growth for ages.It’s all down to strong growth in Europe, apparently, with mobile, fixed and enterprise all heading in the right direction.India is still a bit of a struggle but even there Vodafone reckons the worst of the Jio-induced carnage may be over.The result is anticipated organic growth of around 10% for the 2018 financial year, up from the previous guidance of around 6%.“In the first half of the year we have maintained good commercial momentum,” said Vittorio Colao, Vodafone Group Chief Executive.“Revenue grew organically in the majority of our markets driven by mobile data and our continued success as Europe’s fastest growing broadband provider.
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