Facebook Mark Zuckerberg CEOFacebook s Mark Zuckerberg is one of the most influential people in tech – remember how the crowd went nuts when he stole Samsung s Galaxy S7 show a few months ago?– but he s not going to be in charge of the most popular social network on Earth.And when he does step down from day-to-day management operations, he shouldn t be able to dictate the future of the company.DON T MISS: Amazon s 15 best daily deals: $10 Google Cardboard, Bose home theater, a free HDTV and moreAccording to Reuters, Facebook s board proposed removing Zuckerberg s majority voting control of the company in the event he should retire from managing the business.The latter give him control over 53.8% of the company, meaning that he can do pretty much what he wants with Facebook regardless of whether he s running it or not.These new terms thus ensure that we will not remain a founder-controlled company after we cease to be a founder-led company, the board said.
The Guillemot family is giving up on the inevitable in its battle with Vivendi.The family said it would sell the majority of its shares in mobile game publisher Gameloft to Vivendi, which  has been waging a months-long campaign to take over Gameloft.It recently said it controlled the majority of shares.Michel Guillemot is chief executive Gameloft and a member of the family that also founded Ubisoft , and he and his family held about 21.7 percent of Gameloft s stock.Vivendi controls 56 percent of Gameloft s voting rights, and the French media conglomerate said it planned to appoint a majority of new directors to the mobile game publisher s board at its June 29 annual meeting.Vivendi, which used to own a big stake in Activision Blizzard, wants to get back in the games business.The family maintains that Vivendi s hostile approach goes against the best interest of Gameloft, both for its activity and for its teams, the Guillemot family said in a statement.Vivendi now owns 17.7 percent of Ubisoft and is seeking board representation.In a positive development for Ubisoft, its Hungry Shark World mobile game — the sort of title you would expect to come from Gameloft — has taken off and given Ubisoft a foothold in the modern mobile gaming business.
Craig Newmark is the founder of craigslist.His latest venture, craigconnects, helps drive peer-to-peer, grassroots civic engagement and philanthropy to support veterans and military families; trustworthy journalism; voting rights and women in tech.Fifty-three years after the Equal Pay Act and supposedly the advancement of women s rights in the workplace, Silicon Valley still has the feel of a fraternity.Jonathan Beninson recently shared a great post on Medium about structuring mentor/mentee relationships.I figure that if you ve done well, as Kevin Spacey says, it s your job to send the elevator back down — meaning we need to be intentional about opening our doors to women and helping them expand their networks and clout.This is about fairness.
BuzzFeed reports that the two tech titans, both members of the Unicode Consortium — the organization charged with approving letters, digits, and symbols for the encoding standard Unicode — removed several gun-toting characters from consideration in the upcoming Unicode 9.0.A rifle emoji had already been approved by a majority of members for inclusion the Unicode 9.0 release in June, but Apple spearheaded an opposition effort.Ultimately, company s outsized influence — millions of iPhone users send messages containing Unicode emojis every day, and the company retains voting rights — effectively forced the other members to fall in line.The members also agreed to remove a second, pentathlon emoji that depicts a figure holding a pistol among athletes.The initial reasoning behind the inclusion of the rifle emoji was relatively innocuous.It was intended to appear alongside a set of sports-themed icons — handball, water polo, and gymnastics, among others — timed to coincide with this year s Olympic games in Rio, and indeed, Unicode s webpage of proposed emojis includes descriptors for the rifle such as shooting, hunting, and marksmanship.
Apparently, Unicode – the firm that oversees new emoji – debated the proposed gun glyph, and decided against it, following heavy opposition from tech companies.According to the report, Apple told the Unicode consortium that it wouldn t support a rifle emoji, with one source saying: I heard Apple speak up about it, and also Microsoft.Apple is one of the biggest member companies within Unicode, and has both influence and voting rights.Unicode's proposed 'rifle' emojiThe rifle emoji, and another emoji depicting a man firing a pistol, had already passed into the encoding process for this month s new Unicode 9.0 release, but were dropped at the last minute.Unicode President Mark Davis told Buzzfeed: The committee decided not to mark them as emoji, but to add them as characters that is, normal black & white symbols.Another proposed emoji of a man firing a pistol was also blockedThe rifle was intended to be part of a set of Olympics-themed emoji, as shooting rifles is one of the competition s sports.
The chart includes a summary of the rights for your state, where you can find the exact citation in case your boss doesn t believe you, and whether that time off is paid or not.Here are a few examples for some of the largest states:California: You can take time off at the beginning or end of your shift to vote and up to two hours of that time is paid if you don t have sufficient time outside your work hours to vote.New York: You must request your time off to vote two to ten days before Election Day.Florida: No specific laws that employers must give time off to vote.I recommend reading the citations for your state, which highlight your time off voting rights within the election code, to get all the details.Looking up your rights now is useful since some states require you to let your employer know a few days ahead of time that you ll be out.
The French media conglomerate run by billionaire Vincent Bolloré said Monday that it has bought stock giving it 22.8% of Ubisoft, up from 20.1% just a month ago.The Paris-based conglomerate said that the new stake gives it 20.2% of the voting rights of Ubisoft, which is known for franchises such as Assassin s Creed.But Vivendi reiterated in a statement that it isn t currently planning any tender offer for Ubisoft, nor any takeover of the firm.Ubisoft has for months been hostile to Vivendi s stake-building, saying that Vivendi doesn t know the videogame business and would destroy shareholder value.Vivendi on Monday reiterated its desire for board representation at Ubisoft.The slow increase in Vivendi s stake continues Mr. Bolloré s battle with the Guillemot brothers who founded and run Ubisoft.
MoreA woman walks walk past the main entrance of the entertainment-to-telecoms conglomerate Vivendi's headquarters in Paris April 8, 2015.PARIS Reuters - French market regulator AMF on Monday said French media group Vivendi now owned more than 20 percent of the voting rights of French video game company Ubisoft and 22.63 percent of its equity after purchasing shares on the market.AMF reiterated that Vivendi said it did not plan to make a bid for Ubisoft.The Guillemot family, which owns about 9 percent of Ubisoft, considers the arrival of Vivendi in the company's capital as hostile and has refused so far to cooperate with the media giant, led by billionaire Vincent Bollore.
MoreA man walks past the Ubisoft booth at the E3 Electronic Expo in Los Angeles, California, U.S. June 14, 2016.PARIS Reuters - French video games maker Ubisoft is confident that a majority of shareholders will back its independence from media giant Vivendi, Chief Financial Officer Alain Martinez said on Tuesday.Vivendi, led by billionaire Vincent Bollore, is asking to be represented on the board of Ubisoft because it has become the company's biggest shareholder, owning 22.63 of equity and more than 20 percent of voting rights.That request has been denied by Ubisoft's founding Guillemot family, owner of a 9 percent stake and 15 percent of the voting rights, because it considers the move hostile."We keep on talking and communicating with our shareholders to make sure that all our resolutions receive their support," Martinez said in a conference call discussing the annual shareholder meeting slated for Sept. 29."We think that's the case for the moment."
MoreA general view shows an office of Swedish telecom giant Ericsson in Lund, Sweden, September 18, 2014.TT News Agency/Stig-Ake Jonsson/via REUTERS/File PhotoSTOCKHOLM Reuters - Two of Swedish telecom group Ericsson's main owners have decided Chief Executive Hans Vestberg needs to step down as soon as a replacement can be found, the business newspaper Dagens Industri reported on Tuesday, citing unnamed sources.Ericsson said earlier on Tuesday it would step up its cost-cutting program after its results fell short of market expectations.The stock fell more than 5 percent on Tuesday, and has shed more than a quarter of its value so far this year.Investor and Industrivarden, Ericsson's two biggest owners with a combined 37 percent of voting rights in 2015, has decided Vestberg will have to quit as soon as a suitable replacement is found, Dagens Industri said.
Silicon Valley is gearing up to rock the vote this November.And for many Valley techies there will be no excuses — such as a pesky job to report to — to keep them from the polls this year.As part of a growing push to drive more Bay Area voters to the polls, tech startups are launching voter registration campaigns, partnering on voter turnout initiatives and even pledging to give employees the day off on Nov. 8.Google added voter registration information directly to its search pages this summer, and earlier this month Airbnb celebrated the anniversary of the Voting Rights Act by urging visitors on its website to register to vote, The Hill reported over the weekend.Silicon Valley companies including Airbnb, Lyft and Salesforce have partnered with The TurboVote Challenge to help America reach 80 percent voter turnout by 2020.Other startups are letting their employees skip work on Election Day, Bloomberg reported.Companies that have joined the Take off Election Day campaign include Twilio, TaskRabbit, Survey Monkey, Square, Spotify and DoorDash.Venture capital firms including Cowboy Ventures and August Capital also have made the pledge.VC Hunter Walk has been leading the campaign.On Monday Yuri Sagalov, co-founder and CEO of Palo Alto-based file syncing platform AeroFS and part-time Y Combinator partner, voiced his support in a blog post.
Some tech firms are joining national voter turnout initiatives.And a growing list of companies are making Election Day a day off, hoping their employees will vote, as reported by Silicon Beat.Airbnb added a message on its U.S. website this past Saturday, the anniversary of the enactment of the Voting Rights Act, as reported on The Hill.Airbnb hosts and guests are engaged in the communities they call home and we believe that everyone should be able to participate in the crucial conversations that will shape the future of our country, the company continued.The TurboVote Challenge is a nonpartisan effort to achieve an 80-percent voter turnout by 2020.According to its website, The TurboVote Challenge brings leading companies and organizations together in a nonpartisan, long-term commitment to increase voter participation.
Singapore s move to allow more than one class of shares for its public companies won t be enough on its own to lure international businesses, according to executives and asset managers.Some of the world s largest companies, including Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc., have multiple share classes, which usually are in place to allow minority shareholders to have majority voting rights.An independent body on Monday said it was in favor of permitting weighted-voting rights for new listings on Singapore Exchange Ltd., in what is the city s latest bid to draw initial share sales.The move may help narrow the gap with Hong Kong, Asia s biggest market for initial public offerings, where minority-control voting structures aren t permitted.Hong Kong lost Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. s $25 billion IPO to the U.S. after regulators rejected the Chinese e-commerce company s governance structure.Technology companies would typically first consider the Nasdaq and New York Stock Exchange, and then the Hong Kong stock exchange, said Chua Kee Lock, chief executive officer of Vertex Venture Holdings Ltd., a unit of state investment firm Temasek Holdings Pte.Companies in Vertex s portfolio include Reebonz Pte, Southeast Asia s biggest luxury e-commerce company, and online grocer HappyFresh.Until you attract good companies, no institutional investor will spend time, said Chua, the head of Singapore s largest venture capital firm.
Only 57.5% of Americans voted in the 2012 presidential election.So to increase voter turnout, many believe online voting is the answer.While online voting is unavailable in most states, some have adopted online voting methods to help certain absentee voters cast their ballots.Most online voting rights are reserved for voters that fall under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act UOCAVA .Unfortunately, UOCAVA voters face difficulties sending and receiving absentee ballots.Take military personnel, for instance.The standard way of returning an absentee ballot is via postal mail, but many states also allow returning ballots using fax.However, military personnel are often placed in remote areas without consistent access to mail services, so casting votes online might be more reliable for those people.
Reuters – Major technology companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter are urging Congress to support a plan for the U.S. government to cede control of the internet s technical management to the global community, they said in a joint letter dated on Tuesday.The U.S. Commerce Department has primary oversight of the internet s management, largely because it was invented in the United States.Some Republican lawmakers are trying to block the handover to global stakeholders, which include businesses, tech experts and public interest advocates, saying it could stifle online freedom by giving voting rights to authoritarian governments.The years-long plan to transfer oversight of the nonprofit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, is scheduled to occur on Oct. 1 unless Congress votes to block the handover.The California-based corporation operates the database for domain names such as .com and .net and their corresponding numeric addresses that allow computers to connect.In the Sept. 13 letter, a copy of which had been reviewed by Reuters before it was sent, thetechnology companies said it was imperative that Congress does delay the transition.A global, interoperable and stable Internet is essential for our economic and national security, and we remain committed to completing the nearly twenty year transition to the multi stakeholder model that will best serve U.S. interests, the letter said.Other signatories include Amazon, Cloudflare, Yahoo and several technology trade organizations.Former presidential hopeful Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, who leads the opposition against the handover, will hold a congressional hearing on Wednesday to review the transition, which he has criticized as a giveaway of our internet freedom.Tech companies, technical experts and academics have said the transition is overdue and necessary to keep the Internet open and globally oriented, and that the proposal includes safeguards against any potential abuse by any one country.Reporting by Dustin Volz; Editing by Richard Chang
Reuters — Major technology companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter are urging Congress to support a plan for the U.S. government to cede control of the internet s technical management to the global community, they said in a joint letter dated on Tuesday.The U.S. Commerce Department has primary oversight of the internet s management, largely because it was invented in the United States.Some Republican lawmakers are trying to block the handover to global stakeholders, which include businesses, tech experts and public interest advocates, saying it could stifle online freedom by giving voting rights to authoritarian governments.The years-long plan to transfer oversight of the nonprofit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, is scheduled to occur on Oct. 1 unless Congress votes to block the handover.The California-based corporation operates the database for domain names such as .com and .net and their corresponding numeric addresses that allow computers to connect.In the Sept. 13 letter, a copy of which had been reviewed by Reuters before it was sent, the technology companies said it was imperative that Congress does not delay the transition.A global, interoperable and stable Internet is essential for our economic and national security, and we remain committed to completing the nearly twenty year transition to the multi stakeholder model that will best serve U.S. interests, the letter said.Other signatories include Amazon, Cloudflare, Yahoo and several technology trade organizations.Former presidential hopeful Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, who leads the opposition against the handover, will hold a congressional hearing on Wednesday to review the transition, which he has criticized as a giveaway of our internet freedom.Tech companies, technical experts and academics have said the transition is overdue and necessary to keep the Internet open and globally oriented, and that the proposal includes safeguards against any potential abuse by any one country.This version of the story adds dropped word in fourth paragraph Reporting by Dustin Volz; Editing by Richard Chang
View photosMoreA picture shows the Facebook logo at the Facebook office in Berlin, Germany, August 29, 2016.WASHINGTON Reuters - Major technology companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter are urging Congress to support a plan for the U.S. government to cede control of the internet's technical management to the global community, they said in a joint letter dated on Tuesday.The U.S. Commerce Department has primary oversight of the internet's management, largely because it was invented in the United States.Some Republican lawmakers are trying to block the handover to global stakeholders, which include businesses, tech experts and public interest advocates, saying it could stifle online freedom by giving voting rights to authoritarian governments.The years-long plan to transfer oversight of the nonprofit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, is scheduled to occur on Oct. 1 unless Congress votes to block the handover.The California-based corporation operates the database for domain names such as .com and .net and their corresponding numeric addresses that allow computers to connect.
the Seventh AP fund is suing Facebook after Mark Zuckerbergs plan to give away röstsvaga shares.It may seem strange that a man sues a company in which it is major shareholder in, and which you think is good , " says the ceo of the Seventh AP fund Richard Gröttheim.Richard Gröttheim has throughout the week been in the united states where he is to testify in a class action suit against Facebook.the pension Fund is one of two institutional owners that are leading the protest against the stamp on the A - and B-shares C-shares without voting rights.The new C shares make it possible for Mark Zuckerberg to give away röstsvaga shares without losing power over the company.Read also: the New class paves the way for the Mark Zuckerbergs of philanthropy
Several heavy owners drag Facebook to court.Facebook's founder and major shareholder Mark Zuckerberg has previously announced that he, over time, will give away 99 per cent of their shares to a charitable foundation.But he would also like to retain power over the social network.In the process have Facebook wanted to punch the A - and B-shares to C-shares, which lack voting rights.It is the reason why Facebook sued in a class action in which the Seventh AP fund participates.the Fund, which manages funds in the public pension system, mean that Facebook's aktietrixande will lower the value of its shareholding in Facebook.
Lest you get any ideas about looking away from your screen to pick up the paper election guide you got in the mail and finally get down to reading about all the other candidates and issues besides Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, Facebook wants to suck you back in.So after you ve watched all the recipe videos you want on Facebook, and read all about Lindsay Lohan and the other celebrities on the Trending list, the social network has another treat for you: an election ballot preview to prepare you for Nov. 8.The tool can give you information about races and issues on your ballot.After you read up about them, you can mark your favorites, ask your Facebook friends for their opinions or email yourself your choices.And since it s Facebook, you can choose to share your picks if you d like.Also, Google wants to help you find your polling place, and has been offering a bunch of Google-gathered voting information in its search results.And if you DM direct message Twitter s @Gov account, you can plug in your address and an oh-so helpful chat bot will let you know who s running for mayor and city council where you live, plus other ballot measures and where to find more information about them.That s just the big companies that most everyone has heard of.Other efforts from Silicon Valley to encourage and help voters include the Sean Parker-backed Brigade app, which offers a social ballot guide that encourages political debate.There s also Voteplz, created by Y Combinator s Sam Altman and others, which is available in an app or on the web and includes everything from voter registration too late now, though to information about voting rights to what to expect if you ve never voted before.
More

Top