You can place all kinds of organic waste including meat, dairy and even used kitty litter into the system.HomeBiogasHomebiogas, which costs $995 for a limited time, runs without electricity and its daily gas output is equivalent to about 6 kilowatt-hours of energy.HomeBiogasBecause the systems can be assembled and taken apart easily, the systems have been used in areas that lack electricity.For instance, Reuters reports that the European Union funded a project to bring 40 HomeBiogas systems to the Palestinian village of al-Awja in the central West Bank s Jordan Valley.Jewish Business News also reports that a system was also set up in the Buvundya Orphanage in Uganda, thanks to a donor.The company s chief scientist and cofounder, Yair Teller, told JBN: These children lit up when they discovered the HomeBiogas magic — that they can transform their waste and produce their very own energy.
View photosMoreThe logo of Mellanox Technologies is seen on one of its office buildings in the northern Israeli town of Yokneam October 9, 2013."From our experience in Ramallah, we think we have the potential to collaborate and make our neighbors successful," Chief Executive Eyal Waldman told Reuters in an interview.Arabs struggle to break into Israel's high-tech sector.And Israeli companies need help.But a study among 1,061 new engineering graduates in Gaza showed an unemployment rate of 36 percent.Karin Mayer Rubinstein, head of Israel Advanced Technology Industries, said she welcomed Waldman's initiative.
The code is part of a platform that boosts positive social media posts, photos, news reports and opinion articles that promote Israel – whether that be its booming tech scene or its beautiful beaches – and plays down posts featuring Israeli checkpoints or Palestinian prisoners.Elad Ratson, the head of research and development for the digital diplomacy department at the foreign ministry, cannot explain exactly the second part of the platform, which works to "muffle" pro-Palestinian voices in social media, but said that it is a continuation and an upgrade from efforts undertaken during the Israel-Gaza war in 2014, when students set up a "situation room" at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya.In August, 2014, the social media search engine Topsy found the Gaza hashtag was used more than four million times, whereas the Israel one had been used 170,000 times – the most dramatic online example of Israel's "asymmetric numbers game", said Ratson, in which the number of dead Palestinians has always exceeded Israeli casualties, and has therefore led the stories online and in the press, he argued.A sign painted on a wall in the West Bank in June 2015, calling to boycott Israeli products coming from Jewish settlementsTo meet the growing demand for an online presence, both during times of war and times of peace, Ratson is in collaboration with the Rothschild Fund and other private pro-Israeli organizations, to scour high schools, universities, and private tech companies in both Israel and abroad to participate in an upcoming collaboration project slated to launch in the autumn.Its shortcoming may be explained by the fact that the foreign ministry is led by Netanyahu instead of a full-time minister, who has done little to rein in public diplomacy catastrophes like that initiated by Deputy Foreign Minister Tzipi Hotovely, who earlier this year defied protocol and banned all Swedish officials after its foreign minister demanded an investigation into Israel's extrajudicial killings of assailants during the "knife intifada".In the coming weeks, Israel and its colleagues will open the university's first peace-time "situation room," manned by 20 students and funded by private stipends, and which it hopes will be followed by similar initiatives in Los Angeles and throughout the rest of the world.
Reuters – Israel s Minister of Internal Security on Saturday accused Facebook and its founder, Mark Zuckerberg, of not doing enough to prevent incitement against Israel and said the social network was sabotaging Israeli police work.Israel has in the past said Facebook is used to encourage attacks and the government is drafting legislation to enable it to order Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and other social media to remove online postings it deems incite terrorism.L8N19C1NE But the comments made by Gilad Erdan, a cabinet minister in Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu s right-wing coalition that oversees law enforcement, were particularly biting.He said Zuckerberg was responsible for Facebook policy and called on the citizens of Israel to flood him in every possible place with the demand to monitor the platform he established and from which he earns billions .A spokesman for Facebook in Israel said the company was not commenting on the minister s assertions.During an interview on Channel 2 television, Erdan said, Facebook today, which brought an amazing, positive revolution to the world, sadly, we see this since the rise of Daesh Islamic State and the wave of terror, it has simply become a monster.Facebook today sabotages, it should be known, sabotages the work of the Israeli police, because when the Israeli police approach them, and it is regarding a resident of Judea and Samaria, Facebook does not cooperate, he said, referring to the area of the West Bank.It also sets a very high bar for removing inciteful content and posts, Erdan said.Since October, Palestinians have killed 34 Israelis and two visiting U.S. citizens in a wave of street attacks, mostly stabbings.Israeli forces have shot dead at least 201 Palestinians, 137 of whom Israel has said were assailants.Others were killed in clashes and protests.Palestinian leaders say assailants have acted out of desperation over the collapse of peace talks in 2014 and Israeli settlement expansion in occupied territory that Palestinians seek for an independent state.
Israel s police minister accused Facebook Inc. of complicity in Palestinian violence against his country after back-to-back attacks claimed the lives of a 13-year-old stabbed to death in her bed and a father of 10 killed in a drive-by shooting.Many young Palestinians incite against Israelis on Facebook and the social network fails to take down such posts, Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan said.Facebook also sabotages police efforts and turns down requests for collaboration, he said.The victims blood is partially on Facebook s hands, Erdan told Channel 2 late Saturday.Facebook has turned into a monster.The younger generation in the Palestinian Authority runs its entire discourse of incitement and lies and finally goes out to commit murderous acts on Facebook s platform.A Facebook spokeswoman said the company works regularly with safety organizations and policy makers around the world, including Israel, to ensure that people know how to make a safe use of Facebook.
View photosMoreComputer screens display the Facebook sign-in screen in this photo illustration taken in Golden, Colorado, United States July 28, 2015.JERUSALEM Reuters - Facebook is doing its share to remove abusive content from the social network, it said on Sunday in an apparent rejection of Israeli allegations that it was uncooperative in stemming messages that might spur Palestinian violence.Beset by a 10-month-old surge in Palestinian street attacks, Israel says that Facebook has been used to perpetuate such bloodshed and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's rightist government is drafting legislation to enable it to order social media sites to remove postings deemed threatening.Ramping up the pressure, Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan on Saturday accused Facebook of "sabotaging" Israeli police efforts by not cooperating with inquiries about potential suspects in the occupied West Bank and by "set ting a very high bar for removing inciteful content and posts".Facebook did not respond directly to Erdan's criticism, but said in a statement that it conferred closely with Israel."We work regularly with safety organizations and policymakers around the world, including Israel, to ensure that people know how to make safe use of Facebook.
Israel s minister for public security Gilad Erdan has called Facebook a monster for sabotaging police investigations and called on Israelis to flood Mark Zuckerberg and make him change the site s policy.In a television interview, Erdan said that the recent increase in street attacks by Palestinians was encouraged on Facebook, and the company has not been quick enough to remove violence-inciting posts because there is a very high bar for removing inciteful content and posts.Erdan added that Facebook does not cooperate in West Bank investigations and asked Israelis to flood Zuckerberg in every possible place with the demand to monitor the platform he established and from which he earns billions.For its part, a Facebook spokesperson told Reuters it was working with Israeli authorities and trying to block violent comments, though the company did not directly address Erdan s comments.Social-media sites like Facebook have come under increased scrutiny for their part in the rise of terrorism.Last month, the father of a victim of the Paris attacks sued Facebook, Twitter, and Google for knowingly let ISIS recruit through their platforms.
Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan slams Facebook for not doing enough to prevent incitement and sabotaging the work of the police .Facebook has responded to an Israeli minister's scathing criticism that the social media network is not doing enough to remove abusive content from its site that could incite Palestinian violence against the country.Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan slammed the social media giant on Saturday 2 July , saying it has become a "monster" due to "the dialogue, the incitement, the lies of the young Palestinian generation that are happening on the Facebook platform".Erdan said Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has blood on his hands after a 13-year-old girl was recently stabbed to death in her bed in the West Bank settlement of Kiryat Ara.The killer, identified as 17-year-old Muhammad Nasser Tarayrah, previously announced his intentions in a series of posts on Facebook before the murder, saying he wanted to have a "martyr's death"."Facebook today, which brought an amazing, positive revolution to the world, sadly, we see this since the rise of Daesh and the wave of terror, it has simply become a monster," Erdan told Israeli television station Channel 2 in Hebrew, Reuters reports.
Facebook is one of several social media sites to face criticism over a perceived lack of action when it comes to fighting online extremism.Now, the Isreali government has gone so far as to call the social network a monster for not doing enough to remove posts that incite violence against the country.During a television interview on Saturday, Isreali Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan said that Facebook was sabotaging the nation s police force by not aiding it in investigating potential suspects in the West Bank.Ariel s killer, 19-year-old Muhammad Tarayreh, said he wished to die a martyr s death in a Facebook post made before the murder.Facebook today, which brought an amazing, positive revolution to the world, sadly, we see this since the rise of ISIS and the wave of terror, it has simply become a monster, said the minister.It also sets a very high bar for removing inciteful content and posts.
Israel s justice minister Gilad Erdan has called Facebook a monster for sabotaging police investigations and called on Israelis to flood Mark Zuckerberg and make him change the site s policy.In a television interview, Erdan said that the recent increase in street attacks by Palestinians was encouraged on Facebook, and the company has not been quick enough to remove violence-inciting posts because there is a very high bar for removing inciteful content and posts .Erdan added that Facebook does not cooperate in West Bank investigations and asked Israelis to flood Zuckerberg in every possible place with the demand to monitor the platform he established and from which he earns billions .For its part, a Facebook spokesperson told Reuters it was working with Israeli authorities and trying to block violent comments, though the company did not directly address Erdan s comments.Social-media sites like Facebook have come under increased scrutiny for their part in the rise of terrorism.Last month, the father of a victim of the Paris attacks sued Facebook, Twitter, and Google for knowingly let ISIS recruit through their platforms.
Located in the West Bank, Rawabi is about 5.6 miles north of Ramallah, the administrative capital of the Palestinian Authority, and around 15.5 miles from Jerusalem.Photo:Courtesy of Bashar Masri and Rawabi
A group of Israeli and American citizens is suing Facebook to the sum of $1 billion for allegedly facilitating fatal Palestinian militant attacks on their relatives.The victims include four Israeli-U.S. dual nationals, and one visiting U.S. citizen who were killed in several attacks that took place in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and the occupied West Bank between 2014, and 2016, reports Reuters.The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York accuses Facebook of assisting the operations of Hamas militants.The suit claims Facebook knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas … facilitat ing this terrorist group s ability to communicate, recruit members, plan and carry out attacks, and strike fear in its enemies .Hamas has thus far accepted responsibility for only one of the attacks, but the plaintiffs lawyer claims to have expert assessments linking the Palestinian organization to the other killings.Hamas, which assumed administrative control of the Gaza Strip after winning the 2006 legislative elections, is designated a terrorist group by the U.S. Consequently, the private lawsuit was brought under the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1992, which prohibits American businesses from providing material support to terrorist groups and their assailants.
Lawyers filed a $1 billion lawsuit against Facebook Inc., alleging it allowed the Palestinian militant Hamas group to use it as a medium to carry out attacks that killed four Americans and wounded one in Israel, the West Bank and Jerusalem.Facebook has knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas in the form of Facebook s online social network platform and communication services, making it liable for the violence against the five Americans, according to the lawsuit sent to Bloomberg by the office of the Israeli lawyer on the case, Nitsana Darshan-Leitner.Simply put, Hamas uses Facebook as a tool for engaging in terrorism, it said.Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by the U.S., European Union and Israel.The suit said the group used Facebook to share operational and tactical information with members and followers, posting notices of upcoming demonstrations, road closures, Israeli military actions and instructions to operatives to carry out the attacks.In an e-mailed statement, Facebook said it doesn t comment on legal proceedings to the press.Mushir al-Masri, a senior Hamas leader, said by phone that suing Facebook clearly shows the American policy of fighting freedom of the press and expression and is evidence of U.S. prejudice against the group and its just cause.The suit was submitted to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York on July 10.
View photosMoreA 3D plastic representation of the Facebook logo is seen in this illustration in Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, May 13, 2015.JERUSALEM Reuters - A group of Israelis and Americans filed a lawsuit on Monday seeking $1 billion in damages from Facebook Inc. for allegedly facilitating deadly Palestinian militant attacks on their loved ones.The plaintiffs, relatives of four Israeli-U.S. dual nationals and one visiting U.S. citizen who died in attacks in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem or the occupied West Bank between 2014 and 2016, accused Facebook of helping Hamas militants operate.The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, argued that Facebook "knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas ... facilitat ing this terrorist group's ability to communicate, recruit members, plan and carry out attacks, and strike fear in its enemies".The social media giant did not respond directly to the lawsuit but said it stood by its regulations for preventing abusive content and a company representative in Israel said the company wanted "people to feel safe" when using Facebook."There is no place for content encouraging violence, direct threats, terrorism or hate speech on Facebook.
The families of Israeli and American victims killed in recent Palestinian attacks in Israel, the West Bank and Jerusalem have filed a $1bn £765m lawsuit against Facebook, alleging that the company has "knowingly provided material support and resources" to terrorist group Hamas.Filed in New York on 10 July, the suit claims that the social media giant violated US anti-terror laws by knowingly allowing Hamas to use its platform to incite violence and terrorist attacks."For years, Hamas, its leaders, spokesmen, and members have openly maintained and used official Facebook accounts with little or no interference," the lawsuit reads."Despite receiving numerous complaints and widespread media and other attention for providing its online social media platform and communications services to Hamas, Facebook has continued to provide these resources and services to Hamas and its affiliates.""Simply put, Hamas uses Facebook as a tool for engaging in terrorism.""For way too long, the social media companies have been allowed to believe that the anti-terrorism laws do not apply to them, that they have blanket immunity and they can do whatever they please," Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, an attorney for the plaintiffs, told ABC News.
A lawsuit filed against Facebook Inc. on behalf of terrorism victims in Israel illustrates some of the complications of going to court to remedy violent radicalism.Fortunately, there s a better way to address the problem of militants exploiting social media.Lawyers for the victims sued Facebook in Manhattan federal court on Monday, seeking $1 billion in damages.They alleged that the U.S. company allowed Palestinian militants affiliated with Hamas, branded by the U.S. government as a terrorist organization, to use the online service to plan attacks that killed four Americans and wounded another in Israel, the West Bank, and Jerusalem."Simply put, Hamas uses Facebook as a tool for engaging in terrorism," the lawyers wrote.The suit alleged that Hamas has used Facebook to share operational information and instructions for carrying out attacks.Whatever one's position on the Middle East conflict, it's fair to say that the suit against Facebook faces some serious legal hurdles.First, there is the so-called safe harbor provision of the Communications Decency Act.
A glitch caused West Bank and Gaza to disappear from Google MapsOutrage online that Google deleted Palestine from its Maps service after a glitch caused the West Bank and Gaza to briefly disappear, prompted the internet giant to explain that the country "has never been" on the service.Palestine, although recognised as a country by the United Nations, has never been on Google Maps.Instead of being demarcated with a solid line that denotes a country border, Google instead defines the Gaza Strip and the West Bank with a dashed border - the mark it uses to outline disputed territories.Google was forced to explain that it doesn't define Palestine as a country separate from Israel on Maps after a petition signed by 250,000 people described the company's "airbrushing" of Palestine as "deeply offensive" and called for the internet giant to put Palestine on its map.A glitch that briefly removed the labels for the West Bank and Gaza, according to Google, sparked outrage on social media, with people tweeting under the hashtag PalestineIsHere.
Google has been forced to deny accusations it has deleted Palestine from Maps after a bug led labels on the West Bank and Gaza to disappear.After critics claimed Palestine had been "airbrushed" out, the tech giant explained to WIRED that it was never there in the first place and that it is working on getting the labels back.Despite being recognised as a state by the United Nations, Palestine is not deemed to be a separate country from Israel by Google Maps.While country borders are denoted by solid lines, Google Maps demarcates the Gaza strip and the West Bank with a dotted line - the mark it uses to illustrate disputed territories.A Wikipedia knowledge box that pops up over the map describes Palestine as a 'de jure sovereign state,' a term that was allotted by the UN in 2013.Google was forced to clarify its cartographical position on Palestine after an online petition, which already has more than quarter of a million supporters, described its omission of Palestine as 'a grievous insult to the people of Palestine'.
But the west bank and the Gaza strip fell victim to a bug.One of last week's big star was that the name Palestine was not reflected in Google Maps.Something that aroused strong reactions on the internet, where all sorts of theories about why the it giant excluding the name circulated.Now, the question has received an answer.Techsajten Endgadget, which has been in contact with Google, can report that the name "Palestine" never existed excellent as a point on the map in Google Maps.however, What actually has happened is that the areas of the Gaza strip and the west bank have lost their labels, which Google blames it on a bug in their map service.
The PayPal4Palestine hashtag has been making waves on social media after 43 companies and organizations in Palestine published an open letter to Paypal asking for the payment platform to work there.The group behind the hashtag and the letter, Americans for a Vibrant Palestinian Economy A4VPE , ask PayPal CEO Daniel Shulman pictured to consider the fact that PayPal operates in 203 countries, many of which could be considered far less stable than Palestine, including Somalia and Yemen.We have been told that PayPal is concerned about the compliance investments required to enter the Palestinian market.A spokesperson for startup accelerator Gaza Sky Geeks GSG , one of the signatories to the letter, said: GSG is a major work hub for startups and freelancers in Gaza — payments are one of the toughest issues for them.After working tirelessly to win business in the global marketplace, they then have to pay steep fees for wire transfers or foreign banks to get paid.Businesses in Gaza and the West Bank just want access to the same opportunities PayPal affords to the other 200 countries and territories they serve.
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