Has Apple unfairly locked down iOS? Or is it boxed in by external competitors?
1
Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Sure, “hot-tubbing” sounds fun, but in a court context, it’s just a judge encouraging lawyers to argue — which is how Epic v. Apple ended today. Not with a bang but with a quarrel. In honor of the trial’s final day, a raft of spare lawyers were in the gallery, representing Epic and Apple. But everyone who spoke to the judge — Epic’s Gary Bornstein and the three lawyers who handled the end of the case for Apple, Dan Swanson, Veronica Smith Moye, and Richard Doren — had their backs to the gallery the entire time. Throughout the trial, Epic’s general strategy appears to have been to stuff the record as full of evidence as possible — just in case it’s needed on the inevitable appeal. To do that, Epic sacrificed telling a coherent story. A... Continue reading…
1
The Epic v. Apple trial was bookended by Tims. Epic Games called its CEO Tim Sweeney as the first witness nearly three weeks ago. Yesterday, Apple called Tim Cook as the last to take the stand, before both sides make their final case to a judge on Monday. Cook was supposed to bring home Apple’s defense of its ecosystem. He did it by laying out Apple’s most high-minded principles — but also its hard financial calculations. Epic v. Apple covers two separate issues: whether the market for in-app purchases within the App Store is unfairly monopolistic, and whether iOS itself is a monopoly that should be opened up to third-party stores and side-loaded apps. Cook addressed both with an appeal to user safety and privacy. “Privacy from our point... Continue reading…
7
The gaming company's lawyers and the judge both questioned the Apple CEO as he testified in the ‘Fortnite’ antitrust trial.
4
Judge Rogers: "It doesn’t seem to me you feel any pressure or competition..."
8
CEO Cook defends the world's most valuable tech company from one of the largest game makers.
9
CEO Cook defends the world's most valuable tech company from one of the largest game makers.
1
Tim Cook is seen through a window of the federal courthouse in San Francisco | Photo by Philip Pacheco/Getty Images Apple called CEO Tim Cook to conclude three weeks of testimony in Epic v. Apple — and with the end of the trial approaching, Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers engaged Cook in a surprisingly tense exchange over Apple’s business model. Rogers noted that most of Apple’s App Store revenue comes from games, and she asked Cook why developers can’t use other payment methods to sell in-app purchases, or at least tell users they can make those transactions elsewhere. “If they wanted to go and get a cheaper Battle Pass or V-Bucks, and they don’t know they’ve got that option, what is the problem with Apple giving them that option?” she asked. “If we allowed people to link out like that, we would in essence give up our total return on our [intellectual... Continue reading…
1
Cook defends the world's most valuable tech company from one of the largest game makers.
2
Epic Games, the maker of Fortnite, has called the Apple chief to testify.
5
Cook is making a rare court appearance as a sworn witness in defense of Apple in the lawsuit brought by "Fortnite" maker Epic Games.
4
Cook is making a rare court appearance as a sworn witness in defense of Apple in the lawsuit brought by "Fortnite" maker Epic Games.
5
OK, you can't watch, but you can listen, and we'll be covering live as he defends the world's most valuable tech company from one the largest game makers.
6
Fortnite maker Epic Games sued Apple over its restrictive policies over its iPhone App Store. Now, top Apple execs begin testifying.
10
Apple executive Phil Schiller defended the company's App Store policies treating games different from movies.
10
Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Expert testimony continues Continue reading…
3
Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge Last week, the judge in Epic v. Apple asked whether Epic really had an antitrust case against Apple, or whether it just wanted to help kids make impulse purchases. Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers was talking about the importance of where and how people pay for their apps, and today she continued that line of questioning to the point of suggesting a kind of App Store policy change that Epic never originally put on the table. Epic sued Apple for banning Fortnite from iOS over a direct payment system for V-Bucks, Fortnite’s in-game currency. Epic called that unfair and monopolistic. But Apple argued that it lets developers sell in-app purchases through its Safari browser, even at a discounted price — so there’s no lockout. And while Epic... Continue reading…
9
Fortnite maker Epic Games is suing Apple over its restrictive policies over its App Store and iPhones.
8
As the trial for Epic v. Apple entered its second week, both parties took a break from antitrust law to argue over whether bananas should wear clothes in court. The banana in question is Peely, a humanoid fruit avatar from Epic’s game Fortnite. Fortnite, as you may remember, is at the center of the huge lawsuit between Apple and Epic. The trial’s sixth day began with testimony from Matthew Weissinger, Epic’s VP of marketing. And Apple used its cross-examination to offer the court an exhaustive tutorial on Fortnite, beginning with its title screen and one of its skins. Hence the banana: Apple attorney: We have in front of us a new set of images, and what is this screen showing? Weissinger: This is your matchmaking lobby. Attorney: And we... Continue reading…
2
Microsoft Xbox exec called up to explain differences with gaming console The legal spat between Epic Games and Apple entered somewhat philosophical territory on Wednesday as the battling sides debated over whether the iPhone legitimately constitutes a general-purpose computing device, or is merely a locked-down platform with a specific purpose, such as a games console.…
10
More

Top