As a marketer that hates traditional and annoying advertising, I constantly pursue how to make them less annoying and actually engaging - giving that, sadly, traditional ads doesn t go anywhere.So, to not come across as part sleazy salesman and part unconstructive grumpy old man, I have come up with an idea and example of it, that can actually change something.The below linked audio drama episode, blogpost and the game, the episode is set in - I m involved in all of it, so I m super-biased.So, curios what you guys think - if this idea is even viable?Short description of what it is: Basically, it is creating story-driven content set within the world of a marketed entertainment product.NOT directly advertising the product in mention, but showing the setting, tone, feel and maybe some central characters.
Good enough just won t cut it when it comes to content marketing, so what can you do to stand out in the digital crowd?I've identified six key characteristics that separate great B2B content from the merely good, pulling evidence from some of our most successful programs to show why great content matters more in 2017 than ever before.From crafting the perfect headline to keeping your articles concise and to the point, compelling content goes a long way in the competitive world of digital marketing.Some marketers assume that B2B content can never be quite as exciting as consumer facing content; but The Mosaic Company, a global leader in phosphates and potash crop nutrition, proves otherwise.Its 10-episode fictional audio drama explores intriguing agricultural stories, often highlighting problems that could be solved with its services.The key to creating successful interactive content is to think about what your target audience will find engaging and useful.
p If you were still somehow hoping that the Doctor Who spinoff series Torchwood could return to TV, six years after it last aired, then we’ve got some news for you.The good news is Torchwood is finally getting an official continuation!The bad news is if you wanted it on TV, because it’s going to be a new audio drama series from Big Finish.This is far from Torchwood’s first big return to the world of audio dramas.Big Finish, who also do a long-running series of Doctor Who stories, have been doing Torchwood dramas with John Barrowman’s Captain Jack and even the pre-Miracle Day version of the team for a while now.But the newly announced Torchwood: Aliens Among Us, is being billed as an official return and continuation of the series after the events of its (honestly rather terrible) fourth season, Miracle Day.
p , the leading retailer, distributor and publisher of audiobooks and premium spoken word programmes, has appointed PrettyGreen as its retained consumer PR and Events consultancy.PrettyGreen will oversee all of Audible’s consumer PR brand, alongside Midas PR, who will continue to look after the trade and literary press.PrettyGreen’s activity kick started with the launch of Alien: River of Pain, a first of its kind experience, whereby Audible beamed the new audio drama into space at an exclusive first-listen event at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich’s planetarium, ahead of the audio drama’s release last week.Emma Grace, joint managing director at PrettyGreen, commented on the collaboration: “We have an incredible opportunity to position Audible as a leading player in the entertainment category, building brand fame around its rich content.Audible have a fresh thinking and curious approach to comms and we are looking forward to working together."PrettyGreen is an entertainment, sports and wellbeing agency based in London.
The BBC is known for producing radio plays, but the format is about to get a high-tech twist: a new experiment by the broadcasting company will turn traditional audio dramas into interactive stories.One new radio play — a comedy / science fiction story titled The Inspection Chamber — will work similarly to a choose your own adventure book or game.Listeners will hear a chunk of the story, and then be presented with a choice of what should happen next.It was developed by the BBC’s R division, which worked with an audio company called Rosina Sound.The piece is said to take inspiration from games like The Stanley Parable and Papa Sangre, especially in terms of exploring new ways to offer interactive fiction.You can listen to some of it now over at the BBC’s R blog.
While the BBC might be best known (at least, in America) for the creation of popular shows like Doctor Who, Broadchurch and Luther, they've also been known to create radio dramas on a regular basis.It's a storytelling medium which doesn't seem to lend itself much to technological innovation... at least, if you're anybody but the BBC.Today, the broadcaster's Research & Development branch unveiled a project they're particularly excited about: an "interactive comedy science fiction audio drama" designed for Alexa and Google Home smart speakers called "The Inspection Chamber."If you're wondering what an interactive audio drama is, the best comparison one could draw would be to compare this storytelling format to what you'd see in a classic choose-your-own-adventure novel... except, in audio form.Indeed, according to the BBC, that's exactly what they're aiming for: short chunks of story followed by a decision of some sort on the player's (listener's?)Fortunately, there won't be any frantic page-flipping here.
Those smart speakers and virtual assistants have a lot of useful and not so useful features, but the whole voice control thing means there's still a lot of untapped potential.Hoping to unlock another slice of said potential is the BBC, which has announced a new interactive radio play for both Amazon's Alexa and Google Home.It's a comedy/sci-fi story titled The Inspection Chamber, and it sounds like a choose-your-own-adventure-type deal.You listen along with whichever device you're using, and it'll give you some options for what will happen next.As the BBC describes it, you'll be using your voice to direct the play's characters:"We’ve built a story engine which allows us to release the same story across different voice devices.
Media companies have mostly used voice-activated devices like Amazon Echo and Google Home to deliver news headlines.One result of this is “The Inspection Chamber,” a Kafkaesque audio drama developed over the last nine months with production company Rosina Sound.The two scientists, who may be aliens, have to correctly identify a new life form, the listener, before they can go home.The listener undergoes a scientific examination, answering questions like, “Do you feel special?” and “Are you in a happy mood or a gloomy mood?”“The scientists have different approaches to solving the riddle, so there’s tension between them and tension between them and Dave, who appears less reliable than a computer,” said Henry Cooke, senior producer at BBC’s R team.The story runs about 20 minutes.
The BBC, in collaboration with Rosina Sound, is working on an interactive radio play for artificial intelligence-enabled home chatbots like Amazon’s Echo and Google Home.Check out VB Summit on October 23-24 in Berkeley, a high-level, invite-only AI event for business leaders.The story’s narrator will ask you, the listener, questions throughout the story.The questions are designed so the listener doesn’t have to step out of the story to consider their decision, but instead feels like they’re a character in the story.The creators of the play said they took inspiration from games like The Stanley Parable and Papa Sangre, and authors such as Franz Kafka and Douglas Adams.The story became, in the creators’ own words, “a comedy science-fiction audio drama.”
The BBC has a rich history in radio, after having been founded as a wireless broadcaster back in the 1920s.But now, the corporation is embracing the world of interactive audio stories with the release of The Inspection Chamber, a sci-fi comedy drama that you use your voice to participate in.The experience can be downloaded from the Alexa Skill Store or the BBC Taster website, at which point you'll be able to play along as a fourth character.The experience has been developed by the BBC's R department alongside Rosina Sound.The BBC's department has been embracing new technologies for years, including co-developing the first broadcast-ready HDR standard Hybrid Log Gamma, and investing heavily in VR experiences.The Inspection Chamber is not the first interactive story released for Alexa with the likes of Runescape: One Piercing Note, but the corporation's history in radio makes this release an especially interesting proposition.
Last month, the BBC announced that it was producing a new type of interactive audio drama called The Inspection Chamber.Using a “story engine,” listeners would be able to interact with, and influence, the outcome of the story.Earlier this week, BBC debuted the story as an Amazon Alexa skill, and UK users can listen to it now.The story begins with a computer called Dave that tells the listener that a pair of scientists will be looking at you, to try and figure out what type of creature you are.The answers you provide will help shape the story and bring you to one of several potential endings.The design team noted that they were inspired by video games such as The Stanley Parable and Papa Sangre, and authors such as Franz Kafka and Douglas Adams.
When This War of Mine first launched in 2014, it offered a raw perspective on war and its horrors.Developer 11 Bit Studios is releasing a series of downloadable content tales that will shift the focus to personal stories rather than just trying to eke out an anonymous living in a city under siege.The first episode, Father’s Promise, is out today for $2 on Steam, and players can also purchase a season pass for all future DLC for $5.Two other episodes are coming sometime in 2018.Father’s Promise riffs on an audio drama by Polish author Łukasz Orbitowski, who’s also known as the Stephen King of Poland.He won the Polityka Passport Award in 2015 for literature, and frequently writes in horror, science fiction, and fantasy genres.
When it comes to smart speakers, the BBC is actively embracing the future.Not only has it released an interactive audio drama for the Amazon Echo and Google Home, it's gone ahead and released an Alexa skill that brings in all of the BBC's local radio and podcast services - with support for other smart speakers coming in the near future.The BBC is a big producer of audio content, with 10 national radio stations, six regional stations, and 40 local stations across the UK.There's also the world service being beamed out across the globe, and the fact that it's the world's second largest producer of podcasts.The Alexa skill is designed to make accessing all of that content easy, with a single unified voice service.According to the BBC is also allows the corporation to introduce a number of pop-up stations to cover events, festivals, and genres without too much hassle.
BBC R has launched a new interactive radio drama for Amazon Alexa that's different for everyone who hears it.The Unfortunates is adapted from a BBC Radio 3 play starring Martin Freeman, which was based on an experimental 'book in a box' novel by BS Johnson.The story contained 27 unbound sections, with only the start and end points specified; the rest could be read in any order.The story, which was originally released in 1969, follows a sports journalist whose memories of a friend are triggered when he is sent to report on a football match, and according to the author, the format is intended to convey "the mind's randomness".Last year, BBC R released its first interactive audio drama for smart speakers: sci-fi story The Inspection Chamber."[We] found a perfect example of a story we could bring to smart speakers, creating something which would sound and interact like a traditional radio programme but also take advantage of new technology"
The idea of a Star Wars audio drama might seem a bit niche, but there have been loads since 1981's wonderful National Public Radio adaptation of the original movie, in which actors performed a dramatic reading of that story.We've had adaptations of various movies and comics since then, but Dooku: Jedi Lost is the first in many years.It's basically a short novel -- clocking in at 6 hours and 21 minutes -- read by a full cast.It reveals the early days of Jedi Master Dooku, who'll ultimately take the super villainous title "count," become a Sith Lord and kick off a galactic conflict in Star Wars Episode 2: Attack of the Clones (where he's played by the late Christopher Lee).The story is told from the perspective of Dooku's apprentice, Asajj Ventress, who learns about him during a mission to rescue his sister.Things rapidly become more intense as Dooku ages and his morality becomes twisted, but it's fascinating to see him as a good man and a charismatic hero as we move through his life.
The idea of a Star Wars audio drama might seem a bit niche, but there have actually been loads.Classic comics like Dark Empire and Tales of the Jedi got adapted for audio, and in 1981, National Public Radio did a wonderful version of the original movie, with actors like Mark Hamill and Anthony Daniels presenting a dramatic reading of the story.So Dooku: Jedi Lost is the latest in a long line of audio dramas set in the Star Wars universe.It's essentially a short novel -- clocking in at 6 hours and 21 minutes -- read by a full cast.It reveals the early days of Jedi Master Dooku, who'll ultimately take the super villainous title "count," become a Sith Lord and kick off a galactic conflict in Star Wars Episode 2: Attack of the Clones (where he's played the late Christopher Lee).Things rapidly become more intense as Dooku gets older and his morality becomes twisted, but it's fascinating to see him as a good man and a charismatic hero as we move through his life.
Yesterday, Disney announced a fully armed and operational movie slate, bolstered by its recently formalised acquisition of Fox.But the news brought with it a bit of a bombshell for Star Wars fans: new films are coming, but they won’t start coming until 2022, three years after The Rise of Skywalker.“How can less Star Wars be a good thing,” you might ask?We’re just not getting it on the big screen for the next few years after the Skywalker Saga comes to an end in December this year.Too much of a good thing: It exists!But that’s not the point I’m making here – the point is that the lack of a galaxy far, far away at the cinema does not make that galaxy any further away from us.
Yesterday, Disney announced a fully armed and operational movie slate, bolstered by its recently formalised acquisition of Fox.But the news brought with it a bit of a bombshell for Star Wars fans: new films are coming, but they won’t start coming until 2022, three years after The Rise of Skywalker.“How can less Star Wars be a good thing,” you might ask?We’re just not getting it on the big screen for the next few years after the Skywalker Saga comes to an end in December this year.Too much of a good thing: It exists!But that’s not the point I’m making here – the point is that the lack of a galaxy far, far away at the cinema does not make that galaxy any further away from us.
The Seventh Doctor was a mastermind of fiendishly clever plans that really pushed not just the Doctor’s famous intelligence to its limits, but often involved his infamous dark side, too.And in his next audio adventure, he’s going to need all the fiendish cleverness he can muster – and perhaps even just some fiendishness – to save the day.Gizmodo can exclusively reveal a first look – well, a first listen – at what’s to come for Sylvester McCoy’s Seventh Doctor in Dark Universe, penned by Guy Adams.Set immediately before Big Finish’s epic multipart Eighth Doctor series Doom Coalition, Dark Universe sees McCoy’s Doctor reunited with his beloved companion Ace, once again played by Sophie Aldred, as he goes up against the sinister Time Lord the Eleven (played by the returning Mark Bonnar, who’s been both foe and uneasy ally in several of the Eighth Doctor dramas beyond Doom Coalition).But there’s a twist for the Doctor that even he’ll struggle to overcome this time around.It’s been 20 years since Ace last saw him, and things have changed a great deal.
Move over, Doctor—there’s a new pilot at the TARDIS console room controls, and a lifetime’s temping in Chiswick has prepared her to be the universe’s greatest defender.Big Finish has announced that its latest Doctor Who audio drama will bring Catherine Tate back behind the microphone as one of the show’s finest companions, Donna Noble...except this time, Donna’s flying solo.Yes, there’s no Tenth Doctor around in Donna Noble: Kidnapped!, a four-story series from Jacqueline Rayner, John Dorney, James Goss, and Matt Fitton.Set shortly after the events of the season four two-parter “Silence in the Library/Forest of the Dead”—which saw Donna briefly sucked into a digital happily-ever-after-life where she lived in wedded bliss, only to lose it all when the titular library’s archival systems were restored—Kidnapped!sees Donna briefly return home for a little break between adventures in time and space...only to immediately get wrapped up in her own adventures.Tate will of course reprise her role as Donna, as she previously has for two seasons of Doctor/Donna adventures with David Tennant for Big Finish, and will be joined by Jacqueline King as Donna’s judgemental mother, Sylvia.
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