When it comes to affordable, low-cost 3D bioprinting it s safe to say that we re still a few years away from being able to print out fully-functioning kidneys from the comfort of our own homes.The Aether 1, however, hopes to represent a step in the direction of increased affordability.A sub-$9,000 3D bioprinter set to make its debut later this year, the Aether 1 makes some very bold claims for itself — including its ability to outperform rivals with price tags in excess of $250,000.To demonstrate its promise, Aether 1 s creators recently debuted a gorgeous 22x speed video showing a proof-of-concept of how the 3D printing of bones will look on the upcoming bioprinter.The video shows two bones printed with a synthetic bone material, similar to something called hydroxyapatite, Ryan Franks, Aether 1 s CEO, told Digital Trends.Each bone is wrapped in a band of graphene.
Forget Bjork s 3D printed mask — additive manufacturing could soon be a regular part of facial reconstructive surgery, thanks to facial implants created from printed tissue cartilage.That s according to a new project by renewable materials specialist American Process Inc. in association with Swansea University Medical School in the U.K.Researchers on the project are developing durable 3D-printed tissue that s capable of being used in a variety of ways as part of facial reconstruction.We are printing living tissues, living structures, tailored to the needs of individual patients, project lead Professor Iain Whitaker has said.We hope that in the future, patients who have lost all or part of their ear or nose through trauma or cancer could have reconstruction using new tissue which is grown from their own cells using nanocellulose.Biomaterials are a key component of our tissue-printing technology and nanocellulose is our biomaterial of choice because of its biocompatibility, mechanical and structural properties that can support cell attachment and growth in three dimensions.
TechCrunch is pleased to bring you Indiebio s Demo Day this Thursday, July 14th from San Francisco.Backed by SOS Ventures, Indiebio is the largest life sciences accelerator to date.Indiebio provides each startup in the accelerator with $250,000, lab space, and expert mentors including 23andMe co-founder Linda Avey and father of the Human Genome Project, George Church.IndieBio s third batch includes 15 companies within several broad categories: 21st Century Medicine, future of food and agriculture, new biotools, consumer biotech.Mycoworks– Mycoworks is a biomaterials company that uses mycelium and agricultural waste to create natural alternatives to leather.Their materials are performance engineered, animal-free, sustainable, and cost-competitive, with immediate applications in footwear and fashion.
Drinking and driving may be a terrible idea, but Ford is looking at giving its cars a shot of tequila - or, at least, what's left over when Jose Cuervo has had its way.The automaker and the drinks company are exploring how bioplastics produced from what's left over of the agave plant distilled to make tequila could result in more environmental friendly components in future vehicles.Tequila is made from the central portions of the agave plant, which is first roasted, then ground up, and finally has its juices extracted.That liquid goes on to be distilled into the alcoholic drink, while the fibers that remain are used in composting and to make paper.Ford's idea, though, is to repurpose the biomaterials as an alternative to petrochemical-based plastics."There are about 400 pounds of plastic on a typical car," Debbie Mielewski, Ford senior technical leader in the company's sustainability research department explains.
the Surgeon Paolo Macchiarini is now beating back and JO-notify the Central ethical CEPN .This is after the board criticized two of Macchiarinis scientific articles, writes the daily News.In his complaint to the parliamentary ombudsman, JO writes Macchiarini, among other things, that he believes they have been wrongly treated then he's not had the chance to defend themselves before the allegations became public.He is also critical of the board for the not linked into the international, independent experts in the investigation, in order to ensure a full and fair treatment .both of The articles was about research on matstrupar and trachea and was published in Nature Communications, the respective Biomaterials.CEPN considered to Macchiarini, in both articles, guilty of research misconduct, that is misconduct.
DIRECT RX Combines a New Class of Bioresorbable Drug Coating, Highly Conformable Stent Design and Proprietary Balloon Technology to Provide a Workhorse Coronary Drug-Eluting Stent DES Rapid-Exchange System Designed to Enhance Direct Stenting.NEW PROVIDENCE, N.J.– BUSINESS WIRE –October 24, 2016– Svelte Medical Systems, Inc. today announced it received CE Mark certification of the DIRECT Sirolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent Rapid-Exchange RX System for the treatment of coronary artery disease.The first patient to receive DIRECT RX was treated by Auke Weevers, MD, a practicing interventional cardiologist at Albert Schweitzer Ziekenhuis in Dordrecht, The Netherlands.DIRECT RX provides smooth delivery and the stent conforms well to native vasculature.Adding value in the modern healthcare environment requires new technologies to improve efficiency and reduce cost while enhancing patient outcomes and comfort.DIRECT RX employs DISCREET drug coating, composed of the well-studied drug sirolimus and a natural, amino acid-based polyesteramide PEA bioresorbable drug carrier proprietary to DSM Biomedical, a global leader in biomaterials science and regenerative medicine.
A team from Oxford University has been lumbered with looking at ways to minimise the spreading of infections through splashing and spraying, with a lucky side-effect of coming up with something that might stop men splashing wee all over themselves when using a urinal.On a basic level the system uses a gel or rubber coating to soften impact and minimise piss ricochets, although they were initially looking at the much more serious cases of chemicals vaporising and spreading, plus the risks of infections being sprayed about the place in hospitals.Professor Alfonso Castrejón-Pita from Oxford's Department of Engineering Science said: "It's surprisingly easy to for droplets to turn into aerosols or sprays when they splash.So if you re working with dangerous chemicals or biomaterials, it would be helpful to know that you won t be generating sprays or aerosols if some drops fall, exposing you to diseases or harmful materials.""And the development of a splash-free urinal would also be welcome," he added, as a nice bombshell at the end of the full paper published by the university's Fluid Lab.Oxford Times via Digital Trends
A team from Oxford University has been lumbered with looking at ways to minimise the spreading of infections through splashing and spraying, with a lucky side-effect of coming up with something that might stop men splashing wee all over themselves when using a urinal.On a basic level the system uses a gel or rubber coating to soften impact and minimise piss ricochets, although they were initially looking at the much more serious cases of chemicals vaporising and spreading, plus the risks of infections being sprayed about the place in hospitals.Professor Alfonso Castrejón-Pita from Oxford's Department of Engineering Science said: "It's surprisingly easy to for droplets to turn into aerosols or sprays when they splash.So if you re working with dangerous chemicals or biomaterials, it would be helpful to know that you won t be generating sprays or aerosols if some drops fall, exposing you to diseases or harmful materials.""And the development of a splash-free urinal would also be welcome," he added, as a nice bombshell at the end of the full paper published by the university's Fluid Lab.Oxford Times via Digital Trends
the Year 2020 comes a ban on plastic cups in force in France.From the years of 2020, the French government banning plastic plates, plastic cups and other disposable products with mikroplastkulor.the Ban will gradually enter into force until 2025 when it shall be absolutely forbidden to sell products made of plastic.And even now prompted manufacturers and dealers to replace the plastic with the alternative products of the biodegradable material.– This is a mode that we want to use.Our goal is to eventually become a world leader in biomaterials, " says Åke Rosén, co-founder of Helsingborgsbaserade the company Gaia bio-degradable biomaterial Biodolomer.
Soon can you make a human ear of an apple in your own kitchen.the Price will be around 4 000 sek.Spiderwort, is a canadian company that was spun off from the university of Ottawa.the Next year they will start selling an incubator, a cabinet – where you can grow cells from mammals.the Idea is that it should be easy to upgrade, modify and customize according to their own wishes.Paired with this will Spiderwort to sell våtvara, which are ready for biomaterials in the form of discs, blocks, creams or powders – all taken from the plant kingdom.
A team of scientists from the U.K. s Queen Mary University of London have discovered the secret behind what makes reindeer antlers so tough.In a report published Monday in the ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, the team said it used X-ray techniques and computer modeling to get a closer look at the antlers.The team also examined the antler structures at a nano level, which measures at roughly one thousandth of the thickness of a hair strand, in order to identify what makes them so strong.Scientists were keen to discover why reindeers antlers can endure impacts during fights.First author Paolino De Falco from the university s School of Engineering and Materials Science explained their durability on the school s website.The fibrils that make up the antler are staggered rather than in line with each other, said De Falco.
3D-printed organs are a biopunk’s dream and which may soon come true thanks to researchers from the University of California, San Diego.Led by Shaochen Chen, the team of nanoengineers developed a new method for 3D printing biomimetic blood vessel networks, which may help lay the foundation for functioning lab-grown tissue and organs.Artificial blood vessel networks — which help transport nutrients, blood, and waste — have been 3D printed by other researcher labs in the past, though these methods have proven to be time-consuming and expensive.In his research, Chen sought to make the process faster and cheaper and to develop a network sophisticated enough to be integrated with the human body.“We used hydrogel biomaterials that are biocompatible for potential clinical uses,” he told Digital Trends.More: Scientists use stem cells to grow animal-free pork in a lab
Spinach has long been understood to be good for your heart.But researchers have demonstrated that some day spinach could actually be your heart.Specifically, it could be used to repair damaged tissue by giving human heart tissue a plant-infused vascular system.Scientists have previously fabricated human tissue with 3D printing, but the tiny blood vessels have proven to be a more difficult prospect for duplication.A team of researchers from several American universities has gone back to nature to solve that problem and their results are extremely encouraging.Spinach leaves have fine veins that transport water and nutrients to the plant’s cells.
Spinach has long been understood to be good for your heart.But researchers have demonstrated that some day spinach could actually be your heart.Specifically, it could be used to repair damaged tissue by giving human heart tissue a plant-infused vascular system.Scientists have previously fabricated human tissue with 3D printing, but the tiny blood vessels have proven to be a more difficult prospect for duplication.A team of researchers from several American universities has gone back to nature to solve that problem and their results are extremely encouraging.Spinach leaves have fine veins that transport water and nutrients to the plant’s cells.
Spinach has long been understood to be good for your heart.But researchers have demonstrated that some day spinach could actually be your heart.Specifically, it could be used to repair damaged tissue by giving human heart tissue a plant-infused vascular system.Scientists have previously fabricated human tissue with 3D printing, but the tiny blood vessels have proven to be a more difficult prospect for duplication.A team of researchers from several American universities has gone back to nature to solve that problem and their results are extremely encouraging.Spinach leaves have fine veins that transport water and nutrients to the plant’s cells.
Researchers have created a new type of 3D bioprinting material designed to form custom cartilage knee implants.Wave a tentative goodbye to knee braces!Researchers from Duke University have created a new type of 3D bioprinting material they hope will one day be able to help form cartilage implants for patients with damaged knees.“We’ve developed the first 3D-printable hydrogel that surpasses both the compression strength and elasticity of cartilage,” Feichen Yang, a researcher on the project, told Digital Trends.“This high strength makes it a good candidate for meniscus replacement.”The work is described in a new paper published in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, which spells out how the cartilage-mimicking structures could be used to create customized implants on a patient-by-patient basis.
They certainly don't want to punch out just today, but have a hard time standing out with the idea of the heart as well as just to continue beating for all eternity.Death casts a long shadow of meaninglessness over life.The stated goal is to become a world leader.As an example, at the mention of Business Sweden ”biomaterials and orthopaedic implants, transplantation, regenerative medicine and gene therapy”.Her research team have managed to figure out how the body's own stem cells can produce new bone.– It is possible then to take out the newly formed bone and use it to repair damaged bone elsewhere in the patient.
In their work toward 3-D printing transplantable tissues and organs, bioengineers and scientists from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have demonstrated a key step on the path to generate implantable tissues with functioning capillaries.In a paper published online in the journal Biomaterials Science, a team from the laboratories of Rice bioengineer Jordan Miller and Baylor College of Medicine biophysicist Mary Dickinson showed how to use a combination of human endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells to initiate a process called tubulogenesis that is crucial to the formation of blood-transporting capillaries.The work is an important step with fragile endothelial cells (ECs) made from "induced pluripotent stem cells," or iPSCs, a type of cell that can potentially be made from the cells of any human patient.Because iPSCs can be patient-specific, researchers hope to find ways of using them to generate tissues and replacement organs that can be transplanted without risk of rejection by a patient's immune system.But the fragility of endothelial cells during laboratory growth has limited the utilization of this critical cell type, which is found in all vasculature.Without vascularization, tissues more than a few millimeters in thickness will die due to lack of nutrients, so finding a way to grow tissues with blood vessels is one of the most sought-after advances in the field.
PITTSBURGH (July 10, 2017) ... As a rule, implants and the immune system don't get along.The human body recognizes these materials as foreign substances and tries to fight them like a virus or bacteria.Although this response can cause trouble for doctors and patients, new research at the University of Pittsburgh suggests the immune system can actually assist the body in accepting implanted biomaterials.The National Institute on Aging, one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded Bryan Brown, assistant professor of bioengineering at Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, a five-year, $1.57 million R01 grant to examine how aging affects implantable medical devices.This is the second R01 grant from the NIH Dr. Brown has received this year to support his research of implantable materials.His study, "Assessing the Impacts of Aging upon the Macrophage Response to Implantable Materials," will specifically address reactions to implantable medical devices by the aged body, including immunosenescence (a deterioration of the immune system brought on by aging), dysregulation of white blood cell function and polarization, and delayed resolution of acute immune responses.
The ability to grow functioning capillaries takes us one step closer to the dream of working 3D-printed organs and tissues.For physicians, the dream of 3D printing is to one day be able to print functional tissues and organs for patients, made from their own cells.Doing this will allow a level of bespoke geometric customization and biochemical matching that will dramatically improve the quality of life of tens of thousands of people in need.We have yet to reach that lofty goal but a new project carried out by researchers at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine takes the dream one step closer to reality.In a paper published in the journal Biomaterials Science, the researchers demonstrate a method of generating implantable tissues with functioning capillaries, the tiny blood vessels responsible for supplying the body with oxygen and other nutrients.The demonstration involved using a combination of human endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells to initiate a process called tubulogenesis, that is a key element of the formation of said blood-transporting vessels.
More

Top