Humans love a good space story.That's why it's so much fun to speculate about unusual objects seen in images of Mars.Our imaginations turn rock formations into faces and cosmic rays into alien communications.A recent image from the Mars Curiosity rover generated plenty of online speculation about what looks like a crab-shaped object tucked into a dark cranny.It's probably just a weird rock formation.Join us as we explore some famous Mars mysteries and the scientific explanations behind them.
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Aging also results in things we don't like, such as the formation of wrinkles or sagging skin.The scientists managed to create a reactive polymer blend composition with a tensile modulus of 0.48 MPa, a fracture strain of 826 percent, an adhesive strength of 78 N/mm, and the appropriate elasticity.This level of improvement had only been achieved previously through an invasive surgical procedure called a "blepharoplasty" .Both blinded and trained graders found significant improvements in skin quality after one hour and four hours of wear.Those treated with the placebo also exhibited some modest improvements compared to the baseline, likely due to hydration caused by the polymer layer and potentially optical changes caused by the light-scattering particles.The synthetic material showed a remarkable adherence to the underlying skin and remained intact following activities such as running and swimming.
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Photo: BSIP/Universal Images Group/Getty ImagesA company has been created to develop "novel technology" to help treat type 1 diabetes and potentially negate the need for insulin injections.Islexa, formed after successful pre-clinical studies, will now concentrate on more pre-clinical development, the hope being that trials can take place "in the next few years."Insulin regulates levels of glucose in our blood.Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas produces no insulin, while type 2 diabetes refers to when not enough insulin is produced, or when our body's cells "don't react to insulin.""This is a really exciting technology that has the potential to bring life-changing benefits to these patients," Keith Thompson, CEO of the CGT and Islexa director, said."The collaboration has already delivered promising results and the formation of Islexa will accelerate the development of these lab grown islets and ultimately get this potential treatment to thousands of patients," he went on to add.
New developer APIs will make in-app and mobile web integration simpler.In-app: Android Pay is already integrated into a limited number of apps.That could further broaden the wallet s addressable audience, since mobile users tend to spend the majority of their commerce-related shopping time in browsers but complete purchases at a much lower rate than PC users due to friction associated with slower connections and small screens.Loyalty: Android Pay users can add loyalty and gift cards by selecting a deep link via an email, SMS message, or push notification.Google s expansion of Android Pay s use cases could help make Android Pay more competitive while accelerating adoption and pushing users to test the service.Mobile wallets have lagged in adoption because limited in-store and in-app acceptance has hindered habit formation among potential wallet users.But as loyalty programs are integrated and more consumers rely on their mobile wallets for other features like in-app payments, adoption and usage will surge over the next few years.Evan Bakker, research analyst for BI Intelligence, Business Insider's premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on mobile payments that forecasts the growth of in-store mobile payments in the U.S., analyzes the performance of major mobile wallets like Apple Pay, Android Pay, and Samsung Pay, and addresses the barriers holding mobile payments back as well as the benefits that will propel adoption.Here are some key takeaways from the report:In our latest US in-store mobile payments forecast, we find that volume will reach $75 billion this year.Other potential add-ons, like in-app, in-browser, and P2P payments, will also start fueling adoption.
Slide: 1 / of 7 .Caption: In this image from ESO s Very Large Telescope VLT , light from blazing blue stars energizes the gas left over from the stars recent formation.The result is a strikingly colorful emission nebula, called LHA 120-N55, in which the stars are adorned with a mantle of glowing gas.Astronomers study these beautiful displays to learn about the conditions in places where new stars develop.ESOAdvertisement
India is set to launch a scale model of a reusable spacecraft on Monday, a project that in time could pit the nation against billionaires Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk in the race to make access to space cheaper and easier.The winged vessel -- one-fifth of full size -- is due to blast off on a rocket from Sriharikota base on the southeastern coast, reach an altitude of 70 kilometers 43 miles and glide back at supersonic speeds to Earth for a splashdown in the Bay of Bengal, the Indian Space Research Organisation said.India put a probe into Mars orbit in 2014 for just $74 million, demonstrating a combination of technological capability and low costs that chimes with the goal of more frequent space travel being championed by Musk s Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and Bezos s Blue Origin LLC."India plans to spend about 75 billion rupees $1.1 billion on its entire space program in the year through March 2017, a fraction of the yearly $19-billion-dollar budget of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the U.S.The reusable space vehicle is supposed to provide a cost-effective and reliable option for operations such as launching satellites, according to the Indian space agency.An unmanned mission to the moon that ended in 2009 showed water formation there may be occurring.The Mars probe beat China to the red planet after an almost yearlong voyage.Prime Minister Narendra Modi controls the Department of Space, whose successes give the premier an opportunity to market India as a destination for high-technology investment.The nation remains about eight years away from a full-scale version of the reusable space vehicle, and still has to cross the hurdle of steering the vessel safely back to land rather than water, according to the Indian space agency.Musk s SpaceX in December pulled off a soft, vertical touchdown after the two-stage rocket propelled its payload.Less than month earlier, Bezos sent one of his test rockets to the edge of space and landed it safely back on Earth.
Spiclypeus shipporum, shown here in an artist illustration, would have plodded along a 76 million years ago in what is now the Judith River Formation of Montana.The particular specimen used to identify the species was an adult with a bone infection and arthritis, researchers report today May 18 in the journal PLOS ONE.Dinosaur names and nicknamesThe scientific name Spiclypeus shipporum comes from the Latin words for "spiked shield" combined with the surname Shipp, after Bill Shipp, a retired physicist and amateur fossil hunter who first discovered the bones of the new species.The details of the dinosaur's place on the tree of life are online at judiththedinosaur.com, but the new PLOS ONE paper represents its official scientific debut.The upper bone of one of her front legs showed evidence of infection and arthritis in the joint.None of those specimens have been found farther south than Canada.
Artist s concept of black hole formation Image: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss Among the many mysteries surrounding the gigantic black holes that live at the center of galaxies is just how they managed to get so big, so fast.Finally, scientists have come up with an explanation for their improbably large existence.To test this theory, researchers from Italy s National Institute for Astrophysics and Scuola Normale Superiore had the Hubble, Chandra, and Spitzer telescopes search for evidence of black hole seeds.The details will be published in a forthcoming issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society you can read a working version of the paper on ArXiv .Black hole seeds as seen by Hubble Image: NASA/STScI/ESA Black hole seeds as seen by Chandra Image: NASA/CXC/Scuola Normale Superiore/Pacucci While these two new images lend credibility to the black hole seed theory, researchers still aren t calling the matter settled.
A discovery from the Hubble Space Telescope may have given us our most detailed insight yet into the birth of supermassive black holes.The way these black holes, which contain millions more mass than that of our own Sun, grow from 'seeds' has been debated for many years.Supermassive black holes have existed since the early days of the Universe, appearing less than a billion years after the Big Bang and two theories have sought to explain their formation.This would explain the speed in which supermassive black holes form, in which they are effectively "jump started" and therefore are able to form much more quickly.The team used data from the Hubble telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Nasa Chandra X-ray Observatory, to identify two potential black hole seeds and artificially model their formation."There is a lot of controversy over which path these black holes take," said co-author Andrea Ferrara from Scuola Normale Superiore.
A new experiment looking at clouds is about to change the way we think about climate change.For decades, scientists have thought that the tiny particles that form clouds — and play a big role in keeping the planet cool — were produced as a counterintuitive side effect of pollution.So, while it was understood that we were putting loads of planet-warming gases into the atmosphere and heating things up, it was also thought that at least some of those particles were getting trapped inside clouds and helping to keep that warming from being even more catastrophic.But a study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, which looked more closely at these tiny particles, found that they can be produced naturally.This will help us understand just how cloudy the world actually was before we started polluting it, which is key to figuring out the rate at which our planet is heating up.A cloud conundrumThe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC recognizes aerosols as the single biggest source of uncertainty in human-driven climate change.Part of the problem is that we have no way of measuring just how cloudy the planet was in the preindustrial era.Thanks to this uncertainty, and despite our precise measurements of the effects of human-induced greenhouse warming on climate, the estimates for projected climate change have entertained a wide range of numbers for projected warming, and these numbers haven't changed for the past 35 years.The models predict that if carbon dioxide doubles over the next century, then the planet will warm anywhere from 2.7 to 8.1 degrees Fahrenheit — a critical difference that should inform the way we prepare for the future.So, what's the deal with aerosols?"We found that nature produces particles without pollution," Jasper Kirkby, a European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN particle physicist and the originator and spokesman of the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets CLOUD experiment, told Business Insider.To build a large chamber and keep contaminants below one in a trillion molecules is right at the limit of technology," Kirkby said.The scientists directed a beam of artificial cosmic rays from a CERN particle accelerator at the chamber to study the effects of cosmic ray ions on the rate of formation of aerosol particles.Although the effect of these cosmic rays is likely very small today because of the effect of pollution, in the preindustrial era they could have played a key role.
Click to Open Overlay GalleryChuck Zlotnick/Universal PicturesHowdily doodily neighborino!Yes, your trusty WIRED Culture team is here once again, and this week we have an important question to ask: Is Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising a feminist movie?But it s a wash we re happy to discuss on this week s Monitor podcast.We also take a deep-dive into Chance the Rapper s new album Coloring Book, which just debuted on the Billboard Hot 200 at No.8, despite being a streaming-only Apple Music release.A few helpful links for things we talk about in the podcast:-Lexi Pandell s interview with author Joe Hill about The Fireman–A few pieces about the feminism of Neighbors 2-One of the Lemonade reaction videos Beyoncé is showing on her Formation World Tour-WIRED s pieces on Preacher hitting the small screen-Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne s Google Autocomplete interview with WIRED:
After years of crash-and-burn growth met with copious scandals and user complaints, Reddit is getting back to basics and trying to scale like your average Internet company, albeit one that boasts around 234 million unique visitors powering 8 billion page views per month.Instability everywhereIn February of last year, Weiner met over lunch with Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian just to chat about how things were going at each other s companies.Soon Reddit would have quite a bit more to worry about than just the quality of their code and the growingly insurmountable amount of tech debt that was causing long-promised features like search and the ever elusive official Reddit mobile app to fall by the wayside.Through a somewhat cataclysmic turn of events that followed the firing of Reddit Director of Talent Victoria Taylor, users went wild and moderators began shutting down communities on the site in protest.CEO Ellen Pao resigned shortly after and another Reddit co-founder, Steve Huffman, returned to lead the site he had helped build in 2005.What came from later conversations with Huffman was the formation of what Weiner frames as a very clear focus on paying down a lot of tech debt, building a great platform, starting to build products for our mods and users, and then starting on some of our crazier ideas — the rocket science that we re not to yet, but will be soon.
Scientists have long debated the possibility that some of the key ingredients for life on Earth were brought to our newly-formed planet by comets and asteroids.A new discovery in the fuzzy atmosphere of Rosetta s comet may lend some credence to this theory.The European Space Agency announced Friday that the Rosetta probe discovered some basic building blocks of life on comet 67P, including phosphorus and the amino acid glycine.Therefore, it s possible that the impact of small bodies on a forming Earth drastically increased the concentration of life-related chemicals by impact on a closed water body, according to a corresponding paper published in Science Advances.In contrast, Earth has gone through some dramatic changes since its formation billions of years ago.The important point is that comets have not really changed in 4.5 billion years: they grant us direct access to some of the ingredients that likely ended up in the prebiotic soup that eventually resulted in the origin of life on Earth, said paper co-author Hervé Cottin.
Scientists have long debated the possibility that some of the key ingredients for life on Earth were brought to our newly-formed planet by comets and asteroids.A new discovery in the fuzzy atmosphere of Rosetta s comet may lend some credence to this theory.The European Space Agency announced Friday that the Rosetta probe discovered some basic building blocks of life on comet 67P, including phosphorus and the amino acid glycine.Therefore, it s possible that the impact of small bodies on a forming Earth drastically increased the concentration of life-related chemicals by impact on a closed water body, according to a corresponding paper published in Science Advances.In contrast, Earth has gone through some dramatic changes since its formation billions of years ago.The important point is that comets have not really changed in 4.5 billion years: they grant us direct access to some of the ingredients that likely ended up in the prebiotic soup that eventually resulted in the origin of life on Earth, said paper co-author Hervé Cottin.
Authors like Greg Rucka with Michael Lark and Eric Trautmann and Brian K. Vaughan with Fiona Staples have been knocking it out of the sci-fi park with Lazarus and Saga, respectively.A pair of tattooed Marines go back in time to stop him, but things start to unravel when their stealth plane materializes in a formation of B-17s in the skies above Berlin.The rest of the first issue plays out in 1945, in which British intelligence officer Naomi Givens is tasked with finding out what just fell out of the skies of Berlin.Don't read Archangel expecting boring, anatomically-impossible ladies in revealing outfits.Having to wait at least a month for the next 20-odd pages is going to seem like an eternity.Archangel evidently hit a chord, though.
Microsoft has announced that it has formed a new venture capital fund which will focus on early-stage investment, a new area for the company.Microsoft has long invested cash in external companies: it was instrumental in the deal to send Dell private again, owns a chunk of Facebook, invested in Android port Cyanogen, and was even rumoured to be sniffing around AMD last year.Because we would often invest alongside commercial deals, we were not a part of the early industry conversations on disruptive technology trends,' bemoaned Microsoft's Nagraj Kashyap in a blog post announcing the formation of a new investment group.Dubbed Microsoft Ventures - not to be confused with the company's previous Microsoft Ventures arm of its Developer Evangelism group, which has now been renamed the Microsoft Accelerator - the group will seek out start-up companies in which it can make early-stage investments, as Microsoft seeks to further diversify itself.Initially, it will focus on start-ups located in San Francisco, Seattle, New York City, and Tel Aviv, with expansion promised 'in the coming years.'Kashyap has indicated that 'we re not aiming to hit a specific number of investments annually, but you should expect steady activity over the course of the year' in the field of companies working on cloud technologies complementing Microsoft's own Azure platform, software-as-a-service, Windows- and HoloLens-based personal computing projects, security, and machine learning.
Image: Imke de Pater, Michael H. Wong, Robert J. SaultFor centuries, astronomers have been enchanted by the planet Jupiter, that roiling sea of clouds punctuated by a glowering red eye.Using the Very Large Array in New Mexico, a team led by the University of California, Berkeley, has produced a map of Jupiter s atmosphere down to 100 km 60 miles depth, revealing the gas giant s noxious, ammonia-rich clouds and atmospheric circulation patterns in unprecedented detail.But it s also a mere taste of what s to come later this summer, when NASA s Juno Mission begins probing into the entirely unexplored region at Jupiter s core.Alternating ammonia hotspots and deserts helps explain why, when NASA s Galileo probe made its suicide plunge into Jupiter s atmosphere in 1995, it recorded nitrogen levels much higher than planetary scientists expected.Whatever processes caused Jupiter to be enriched in heavier elements may have laid the groundwork for the formation of Earth, Venus, and Mars.But we can t be certain until we have a better idea of what s really cooking inside our friendly neighborhood gas giant s core.
Sure sounds like aliens—but these strange, glowing patches over Pluto are actually something else almost as mysterious.But, as researchers looked closer at the photo, a question emerged: Uh, what s withthat weird glowing patch in the upper right hand corner?The glowing patch measures over 10 miles across and hovers in Pluto s lower atmosphere.But if you were hoping we d caught a snap of some low-flying craft paying a visit to our solar system, prepare for disappointment: Researchers think it s probably a cloud reflecting sunlight.This would be the first cloud spotted in photos from the New Horizons haul.Models have long suggested that conditions on Pluto would be amenable to the formation of methane clouds—this picture seems to lend credence to that hypothesis.
Using the Very Large Array in New Mexico, a team led by the University of California, Berkeley, has produced a map of Jupiter s atmosphere down to 100 km 60 miles depth, revealing the gas giant s noxious, ammonia-rich clouds and atmospheric circulation patterns in unprecedented detail.But it s also a mere taste of what s to come later this summer, when NASA s Juno Mission begins probing into the entirely unexplored region at Jupiter s core.But while previous studies have been limited to specific latitudes, a recent upgrade to the Very Large Array — one of the world s premier radio observatories — has now enabled scientists to build a global picture, albeit a limited one.Alternating ammonia hotspots and deserts helps explain why, when NASA s Galileo probe made its suicide plunge into Jupiter s atmosphere in 1995, it recorded nitrogen levels much higher than planetary scientists expected.Whatever processes caused Jupiter to be enriched in heavier elements may have laid the groundwork for the formation of Earth, Venus, and Mars.But we can t be certain until we have a better idea of what s really cooking inside our friendly neighbourhood gas giant s core.
It certainly sounds like it could be down to aliens — but these strange, glowing patches over Pluto are actually something else almost as mysterious.But, as researchers looked closer at the photo, a question emerged: Uh, what s that weird glowing patch in the upper right hand corner?The glowing patch measures over 10 miles across and hovers in Pluto s lower atmosphere.But if you were hoping we d caught a snap of some low-flying craft paying a visit to our solar system, prepare for disappointment: researchers think it s probably a cloud reflecting sunlight.This would be the first cloud spotted in photos from the New Horizons haul.Models have long suggested that conditions on Pluto would be amenable to the formation of methane clouds and this picture seems to lend credence to that hypothesis.
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