Stephen Hawking is almost universally revered for his intelligence.Donald Trump is revered for certain other attributes.I can t, Hawking said on Tuesday during an appearance on the news show Good Morning Britain when asked to explain the blustery human clementine s rise to political power.The celebrated genius added, He is a demagogue, who seems to appeal to the lowest common denominator.Hawking, of course, is famous for his work with black holes, general relativity, quantum mechanics, and other Smart People Things.The physicist and artificial intelligence naysayer also discussed another global disaster, climate change, and said it posed a more immediate danger.
Stephen Hawking is almost universally revered for his intelligence.Donald Trump is revered for certain other attributes.I can t, Hawking said on Tuesday during an appearance on the news show Good Morning Britain when asked to explain the blustery human clementine s rise to political power.The celebrated genius added, He is a demagogue, who seems to appeal to the lowest common denominator.Hawking, of course, is famous for his work with black holes, general relativity, quantum mechanics, and other Smart People Things.The physicist and artificial intelligence naysayer also discussed another global disaster, climate change, and said it posed a more immediate danger .
The European Space Agency has said its Lisa Pathfinder mission is performing better than expected.A key part of the space probe was created at Glasgow University.The existence of gravitational waves, as proposed in Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, was proved earlier this year.BBC Scotland's science correspondent Kenneth Macdonald reports.Footage: ESAThey're one of the great mysteries of the universe predicted by Albert Einstein and proved to exist in experiments earlier this year.Now a space probe, party created at Glasgow university, is involved in the search for gravitational waves.
They had managed to detect gravitational waves for the first time, which provided further proof that Einstein s theory of General Relativity was correct.Objects with larger masses warp the fabric to a greater extent than objects with less mass, causing smaller, neighbouring objects to fall towards them.So far, only incredibly large gravitational waves produced from incredibly violent events – such as two massive black holes smashing into one another – have been detected by Advanced LIGO.Second black hole merger eventThe latest signal comes from the final moments when two black holes – one 14 times the mass of the Sun and the other eight times the size – merged to create a massive, spinning black hole 21 times the mass of the Sun.Physicists have analysed the signal which came from the last 27 orbits of the black hole before they spiralled into each other 1.4 billion years ago."It is very significant that these black holes were much less massive than those observed in the first detection," said Gabriela González, LIGO Scientific Collaboration LSC spokesperson and professor of physics and astronomy at Louisiana State University.
Now, the fact of having seen another gravitational wave proves that indeed we are observing a population of binary black holes in the universe.With general relativity, Einstein explained the concept of gravity in an entirely new way.Einstein s explanation of gravity answered questions that Newton s version of gravity could not.Newton described gravity as a constant, instantaneous force in which more massive objects will have a stronger pull than less massive objects.LIGO facility in Hanford, WashingtonBecause we know the speed of light, a precise measurement for each tunnel leg s length can be taken.After announcing their findings, LIGO laboratory executive director Davit Reitze said, This was a scientific moon shot.
We ve all noticed how those last few Cheerios in the cereal bowl seem to cluster together in the center and along the edges.They described their results in a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The Cheerios effect may not be an especially exotic phenomenon—we also see it in pollen floating atop a pond, and the foamy heads of beer—but the actual physical mechanisms at work weren t clearly outlined until a 2005 paper in the American Journal of Physics.Buoyancy is what determines whether something will sink or float, while surface tension is a property arising from water molecules pulling on one another in a dance of mutual attraction.It s a microcosm of general relativity, whereby the mass of the Sun warps the fabric of spacetime, pulling the planets into orbit around it.What is remarkable about our case though is the fact that the direction of the interaction can be tuned by the medium, without modifying the particles themselves.
Back in September of 2015, physicists operating the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory or LIGO for short detected the first round of gravitational waves seemingly proving Einstein's theory of General Relativity."By the end of the decade we'll probably be able to detect at least one gravitational wave event per month," Ken Strain, professor of physics at University of Glasgow involved in upgrading LIGO, told The Register.The mirror suspension system was later updated with four wires made out of ultrapure fused silica glass worth half a million dollars each.Those wires are less susceptible to vibrations allowing the instrument to detect the smallest of gravitational wave vibrations.Scientists hope that once eLISA launches in 2034 it will help them to learn how black holes form and how galaxies evolve."If we can trace back the origins and distances of supermassive black holes, we might get more information on how the universe is expanding.
Scientists think the recent discovery of gravitational waves observed from the collision of two black holes may have also detected signatures of the astrophysics mystery of dark matter.Scientists at Johns Hopkins university behind the September 2015 discovery by Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory LIGO wrote in the Did LIGO detect dark matter?Their discovery came 100 years since Einstein's theory of General Relativity predicted the existence of gravitational waves.It fits however with the model for the less-popular primordial black holes hypothesis in which the objects are said to be formed of collapsed gas during the early universe rather than dying stars.These would distribute evenly throughout the universe and may congregate around galaxies.Some US$600 million has already been spent upgrading LIGO to its advanced state.
Doppler detections will help test Einstein's key theoryGravitational waves released from black hole super kicks may soon be detectable, according to new research published in Physical Review Letters.Einstein realised that gravitational waves were a product of his theory of General Relativity, which found that spacetime behaved like a fabric.When objects with mass – such as stars, galaxies or black holes – moved through this fabric, they emit gravitational waves and send ripples through spacetime.Gravitational waves from the collision of two massive black holes – one was 35 solar masses and the other was 30 – were detected.But signals from black hole super kicks remain elusive.
The GeekOnJava attempts to explain the concept of gravitational waves and the significance of the discovery.Founded in 1992, the project’s main aim is to detect gravitational waves, which were believed to be undetectable.In this case, such a black-hole merging took place about 1.3 billion years ago at a location 1.3 billion light-years away, and its gravitational waves were detected on earth at 5:51 am (US Eastern) on September 14, 2015. 
On the grand scale, galaxies, planets, and all the other big stuff dance to the tune of gravity.Part-in-parcel with creating a unifying model is finding evidence of a connection between the gravity and quantum mechanics.So, if two objects have identical masses and are in free fall, they should follow identical trajectories.And this is what we have observed since the time of Galileo although I seem to recall that Galileo's public experiment came to an embarrassing end due to differences in air resistance .As long as you know the starting velocity of the atoms and measure the time accurately, then you can calculate the force due to gravity.At any given point, a trough may line up with a peak, their peaks may line up, or anything in between.
While recent advancements have given the Hubble Space Telescope more power, NASA and the European Space Agency ESA just took photos of one of the farthest views into space yet — using something almost as simple as gravity.As part of a three-year, 840-orbit program, Hubble recently took photos of a cluster of star systems called Abell S1063, identifying 16 new galaxies.The images show galaxies that were previously too distant to photograph.While there was definitely a pretty powerful telescope involved, the reason the Hubble was able to see so far isn t from new tech but a theory as old as Einstein, because, well, the theory actually stems from Einstein s theory of general relativity.The mass from Abell S1063 is large enough to bend light, acting as a natural magnifier that allowed NASA and the ESA to take this image, one of the deepest photographs of space yet.First, a quick science lesson: Photography lenses and telescopes both work by using pieces of glass to bend light rays to focus them.
When physicists announced in February that they had detected gravitational waves firsthand, the foundations of physics scarcely rattled.The signal exactly matched the expectations physicists had arrived at after a century of tinkering with Einstein s theory of general relativity.Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent division of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciencesAsimina Arvanitaki is not one of those people.A theoretical physicist at Ontario s Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics, Arvanitaki has been dreaming up ways to use black holes to explore nature s fundamental particles and forces since 2010, when she published a paper with Dimopoulos, her mentor from graduate school, and others.Together, they sketched out a string axiverse, a pantheon of as yet undiscovered, weakly interacting particles.
Their effects can be seen in our everyday lives and govern everything from GPS systems to the electricity that powers our homes.In 1905, Einstein's groundbreaking work showed that the speed of light in a vacuum is independent of the motion of all observers, and the laws of physics are the same for all so-called 'non-accelerating' observers.This work introduced a new framework for all of physics, and proposed new concepts of space and time.The theory explains the behaviour of objects in space and time, and it can be used to predict everything from the existence of black holes, to light bending due to gravity and the behaviour of the planet Mercury in its orbit.The three rules of relativityEinstein's relativity theory is deceptively simple and consists of just three rules.
But to you, me, and everyone else, time moves in one direction: from expectation, through experience, and into memory.Many physicists believe it emerges when enough tiny particles—individually governed by the weird rules of quantum mechanics— interact, and start displaying behavior that can be explained using classical physics.But two scientists argue, in a paper published today in Annalen der physik—the same journal that published Einstein s seminal articles on special and general relativity—that gravity isn t strong enough to force every object in the universe to follow the same past present future direction.However, the rules change when electrons start interacting with many objects—like a bunch of air molecules—or decohere into things like dust particles, airplanes, and baseballs.That s why you never see a baseball simultaneously disappear into the left fielder s mitt while also soaring into the upper deck.Although the equation doesn t include a variable for time which isn t all that weird.
Participants confirmed so far include Professor Stephen Hawking, Alexei Leonov, Nobel Prize winners George Smooth, Adam Reiss, Robert Wilson, May-Britt Moser, Susumu Tonegawa and Edvard Moser, as well as Alan Stern, Michel Mayor, Jill Tarter, Brian Eno, and Walt Cunningham.Tickets go on sale on October 24 and more names are due to be announced.Ahead of this year's event, Professor Hawking discusses how he came up with some of his most groundbreaking theories, talks about the breadth of his career and how it's impacted his life, and gives his thoughts on the future of humanity and the universe."My work on black holes began with a eureka moment, shortly after the birth of my daughter, Lucy, while getting into bed."The area theorem can be tested experimentally by Ligo.On September 14 2015, Ligo, for the first time, detected gravitational waves from the collision and merger of a black hole binary.
The "most precise measurement" ever made recently suggested our Universe is expanding much faster than previously thought, casting doubts on earlier predictions and even calling into question Einstein's theory of general relativity.The rate of this expansion may eventually tear the Universe apart, forcing it to end in a Big Rip."Observations have since shown it is in fact expanding, and at an accelerating rate.This means it must have originated from a more compact state that we call the Big Bang, implying that time does have a beginning."Kitching continued: "the faster you move relative to me, the slower time will pass for you relative to my perception of time."This means that in our Universe of expanding galaxies, spinning stars and planets, experiences of time vary and everything s past, present and future is relative.
Professor Janet Hung, 34, is a theoretical physicist at Fudan University in Shanghai.And she s doing so as a professor at Shanghai s Fudan University, blazing a trail for other young scientists from Hong Kong.The portal, buried in a heap of formulas, links the gravity governing stars and galaxies to quantum entanglement at the atomic level, which Einstein dubbed spooky action .Hong Kong has produced many world famous scientists, including mathematician Yau Shing-tung, who received the Fields Medal in 1982, and Nobel physics laureates Daniel Chee Tsui and Charles Kuen Kao, who has been described as the father of fibre optics communications .In the past, few young Hong Kong scholars gave serious consideration to working in mainland China.There were so many concerns, including low salaries, a polluted environment and a lack of academic freedom.
In a 1972 lecture at the University of Oxford, a young physicist named William Unruh asked the audience to imagine a fish screaming as it plunges over a waterfall.The water falls so fast in this fictitious cascade that it exceeds the speed of sound at a certain point along the way.Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent division of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciencesIn the years following Unruh s talk, black holes—places where general relativity and quantum mechanics, the two pillars of modern physics, meet and crumble in paradox—rose from obscurity to become leitmotifs in the quest for an all-encompassing theory of quantum gravity.Hawking s prediction that black holes radiate heat and eventually evaporate completely gives rise to the profound information paradox, which asks what happens to information about the stuff that fell into them.But if information is preserved, as most physicists believe, then Hawking s prediction is wrong, and the task for any theory of quantum gravity is to reveal the flaw in his logic.
After a series of upgrades, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory Advanced LIGO switched on yesterday.Physicists are already stoked about the cosmic collisions they re going to measure during its next six-month run.Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced when the heaviest objects in the universe—neutron stars, black holes, and the like—smash into each other, releasing extraordinary bursts of energy.The spacetime ripples announced earlier this year were detected during Advanced LIGO s very first run, from September 2015 to January 2016.An earlier version of LIGO, which operated in the early 2000s, failed to spot gravitational waves.Peter Fritschel, the associate director for LIGO at MIT, told us that LIGO Livingston has managed to reduce the amount of scattered light—a pernicious source of noise—within its detector, yielding a 25 per cent sensitivity boost.
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