However, the study finds the controversial technology has not, as proponents have claimed, increased the rate of crop yields and has resulted in insect and weed resistance that has become a major agricultural problem.There are people who are saying that without genetically engineered crops, we re never going to be able to feed the world in 2050 and there are people who say that eating a genetically engineered crop will cause sterility or will cause cancer, he said.He also expressed U.S. Department of Agriculture s willingness to work with Congress to prevent further confusion and develop a nationwide system for informing the public about what s in their food products, without increasing costs or giving a false impression about safety.The report concludes that while GE crops have generally had favorable economic outcomes for producers, they ve also resulted in weeds evolving a resistance to herbicides, including glyphosate, a commonly used herbicide which the World Health Organization found likely causes cancer in humans.The report quickly drew criticism from anti-GMO groups, including Food & Water Watch, which USA Today reports accused the committee of arriving at watered-down scientific conclusions due to agricultural industry influence.Jim Thomas, a spokesman for ETC Group, told The Washington Post that the report is inconsistent on the crucially important question of whether or not to regulate the new techniques such as genome editing and synthetic biology.
Foundation Medicine, a company that got its start with backing from Google Ventures, Bill Gates, and other major tech investors, received a patent this morning that protects its cancer genomic sequencing process.Now, it's using that patent to sue a competitor, Guardant Health."We certainly intend to pursue the value of this patent, we also have always been focused on and remain focused on a very patient-centric mission," Foundation President Steve Kafka told Business Insider on Tuesday."So our intent here is not to block other laboratories from their testing ... but really to develop strategies to recognize the value that we've captured or we've created, rather.Guardant declined to comment on the patent.Cancer genome sequencingWhen people are diagnosed with cancer, there's a pretty standard course of treatment to fight off the disease: the doctor may start with surgery or a regimen of drugs that are known to work on a particular type of cancer.But after a while, if that first round doesn't knock out all the cancer cells, the cancer can come back and be even trickier to treat.Those harder to treat and rare cancers is where cancer genomics companies, including Foundation Medicine, are trying to help.And earlier this month, the company launched its liquid biopsy test, which looks for circulating tumor DNA in the blood.That data also goes into a Foundation Medicine database, where people ranging from doctors looking for methods to treat a certain rare cancer to pharmaceutical companies interested in finding the patients who will respond the best to a drug that's in development could look at it.NOW WATCH: Only in San Francisco — inside the 232-square-foot micro apartment that sold for nearly $425,000Loading video...
The pathogen was discovered in Uganda back in 1947, but it wasn t considered dangerous.The Zika virus has been officially linked to microcephaly, a condition in which foetal brains grown abnormally small, as well as Guillain Barre syndrome, a rare disorder that causes temporary paralysis.In the artistic rendering above, molecular biologist David S. Goodsell from the Scripps Institute used colour and shape to convey the virus s appearance and function.The spherical structures shown in pink represent a pair of Zika virus particles in a blood vessel filled with blood plasma cells tan .These studs, of which there about 180, protrude from the particle, allowing it to bind itself to certain human cells, including antibodies and host receptors.The viral genome itself can be seen deep inside the particle yellow coiled around capsid proteins orange .
The pathogen was discovered in Uganda back in 1947, but it wasn t considered dangerous.The Zika virus has been officially linked to microcephaly, a condition in which fetal brains grown abnormally small, as well as Guillain Barre syndrome, a rare disorder that causes temporary paralysis.In the artistic rendering above, molecular biologist David S. Goodsell from the Scripps Institute used color and shape to convey the virus s appearance and function.The spherical structures shown in pink represent a pair of Zika virus particles in a blood vessel filled with blood plasma cells tan .These studs, of which there about 180, protrude from the particle, allowing it to bind itself to certain human cells, including antibodies and host receptors.The viral genome itself can be seen deep inside the particle yellow coiled around capsid proteins orange .
As a result, people will no longer focus on whether or not we should engage in gene editing from an ethical standpoint.Sangamo is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company that is researching ways to commercialize Zinc finger nucleases, which modify a cell s DNA at a location, thereby correcting or disrupting a specific gene.All of this brings us to the subsequent ethical debate, which centers on the potential threat of gene editing, specifically gene-edited humans.Technologies such as cell phones and social media have fundamentally changed global society.The first leukemic patient — who could not be saved by any other therapy — was injected with a gene-edited CAR T-cell product candidate at the Great Ormond Street Hospital in the United Kingdom.2015 was an equally positive year for commercial agriculture, as gene-edited harvests across the United States were abundant, making it conceivable for gene-edited potatoes and soybeans to make it to consumer plates within two years.
We ll Train Them Like DogsJason Tanz WIRED"Whether you re a member of the coding elite or someone who barely feels competent to futz with the settings on your phone—don t get used to it.Our machines are starting to speak a different language now, one that even the best coders can t fully understand...The neural network s operations are largely opaque and inscrutable.Drew Endy and Laurie Zoloth Cosmos Magazine"In a world where human reproduction has already become a competitive marketplace, with eggs, sperm and embryos carrying a price, it is easy to make up far stranger uses of human genome synthesis capacities...Given that human genome synthesis is a technology that can completely redefine the core of what now joins all of humanity together as a species, we argue that discussions of making such capacities real, like today s Harvard conference, should not take place without open and advance consideration of whether it is morally right to proceed."This development raises uncomfortable—and increasingly nontheoretical—questions: If moral responsibility depends on faith in our own agency, then as belief in determinism spreads, will we become morally irresponsible?And if we increasingly see belief in free will as a delusion, what will happen to all those institutions that are based on it?"It s acceleration that produces nausea.
A group of researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have managed to cut out HIV-1 genes from mice and rat genomes.In a proof-of-concept study, we show that our gene editing technology can be effectively delivered to many organs of two small animal models and excise large fragments of viral DNA from the host cell genome, said Professor Kamel Khalili, who led the study.This, scientists hope, could one day lead to the elimination of the deadly virus in human patients as well.This would potentially excise the viral DNA fragment from the genome altogether.After two weeks, the Temple University team examined their subjects DNA, and found that the HIV DNA was no longer present, seemingly removed from every tissue, including the brain, heart, kidney, liver, lungs, spleen, and blood cells.The next step for Khalili s team will be to conduct a larger study on animals, but the team hopes that a clinical trial for human patients could come to fruition within the next several years.
To celebrate the millennium he was originally promised at least 100,000, a pair for every day of the 300 years he hoped to reign.But when the huge chests were delivered to his palace, he found only 20,000, and even those were padded out with huge bales of junk material.When the ambitious project to read 'The Book of Life' was launched way back in 1987 politicians and research administrators were indeed persuaded that we would identify hundreds of new therapeutic targets.And it is certainly true that sequencing the genomes of many species has greatly illuminated our understanding of evolutionary biology.The output of the pharmaceutical industry has declined to become pitifully small while the investment has ballooned enormously.Most are complex interactions involving many components in networks that extend in the body well beyond the genome.
During my undergraduate degree in Human Anatomy, I found the brain and it was my first love!I became particularly interested in how our brain cells communicate to make us who we are and how we lose these functions in brain diseases.With support from both the University of Sussex's Neuroscience Centre and the Sussex Genome Damage and Stability Centre, using cell models, my project, has employed a wide range of cell and molecular biology techniques to identify how amyloid beta and Tau may interact to prevent brain cells from functioning in a healthy manner.These findings recapitulate what happens in the different stages of the disease, indeed confirming the relevance of our findings.As a scientist, I cannot express how exciting it is to think about a problem in the laboratory, design experiments, and seek and find answers to these problems, in ways that are relevant to finding an end to the tyranny of diseases like Alzheimer's.As the most common cause of dementia, causing severe emotional, economic and healthcare burden, David Cameron has pledged more support for research into the disease and hopes for a cure by 2025.
And who gets to define the borderlands and boundaries of what we define as normal?What are the axes upon which we want to divide ourselves?Mukherjee and Crow engaged in a rapid back-and-forth that crossed centuries and academic disciplines and covered Mukherjee s family history of mental illness, the eugenics movement, the Nazis, the genetic engineering of wheat, science education, the maker movement as applied to genetics, the human fantasy of perfection and the personal histories of Gregor Mendel and Charles Darwin.We need to consider how wrong we ve been in the past.One of the purposes is emancipation from disease, replied Mukherjee, before rattling off the transformative impact of the language of genes on our health, from vaccine development to the treatment of breast cancer.Mukherjee said he didn t think the U.S. ever would have state-sanctioned eugenics.
At Human Longevity Inc. HLI , our goal is to extend the healthy human lifespan and to revolutionize healthcare.I believe we have a chance to make 100 years old the new 60… for you, your family, friends and colleagues.HLI capabilities are only possible now because of a number of converging exponential technologies:rapid, accurate whole genome sequencing which has plummeted in cost five times faster than Moore s Law ;Machine Learning; massive data transmission and storage; and new imaging technologies or capabilities .To analyze and report on your current state of health2.So far, the results have been spectacular…From our first 200 Health Nucleus clients, we ve discovered 30 percent have actionable discoveries with immediate clinical impact, or that identify a need for closer ongoing clinical surveillance.While HLI s Health Nucleus is not for everyone, and our capacity is limited, if you are interested in participating, the benefits are numerous.
Last month, a group of scientists, lawyers, and entrepreneurs gathered in secret to discuss the possibility of creating a synthetic human genome from scratch.Image: Steve Jurvetson It s an ambitious goal that will require substantial improvements in DNA synthesis technologies.The new initiative, co-founded by Harvard Medical School s George Church and NYU Langone Medical Center s Jef Boeke, is an effort to overcome current limitations and develop the tools and knowledge required to synthesize long strands of DNA.Exponential improvements in genome engineering technologies and functional testing provide an opportunity to deepen the understanding of our genetic blueprint and use this knowledge to address many of the global problems facing Humanity.In their Perspectives article, the authors said the project will require continual public involvement and consideration of the ethical, legal and societal implications ELSI from the start, while simultaneously adopting a responsible innovation approach.Even with a framework in place, Palmer worries that the process to figure out if a new technology is desirable, effective, or safe can take years.
NEW YORK AP — Scientists proposed a long-term project Thursday that involves creating DNA blueprints for making human beings, a prospect some observers find troubling.That might help scientists identify the effects of genetic mutations, or create safer stem cells for transplantation, said the researchers, George Church of Harvard University and Jef Boeke of New York University.The main goal of the new project is to cut the cost of engineering and testing big genomes more than a thousand-fold in 10 years.Other potential payoffs from the project include engineering virus resistance into mammal cells that are used to make medicines, so that infections don't shut down production, he said.The researchers aim to launch the effort this year after raising $100 million in support from public, private, philanthropic, industry and academic sources from around the world.They said it's hard to estimate the total cost of the project, but that it's likely less than the $3 billion Human Genome Project, which revealed the makeup of the human DNA.
Reuters — A group of 25 scientists on Thursday proposed an ambitious project to create a synthetic human genome, or genetic blueprint, in an endeavor that is bound to raise concerns over the extent to which human life can or should be engineered.A synthetic human genome potentially could make it possible to create humans who lack biological parents – raising the specter, for instance, of made-to-order human beings with special genetic enhancements.The scientists said that was not their aim.They said potential applications from a synthetic human genome include: growing transplantable human organs; engineering immunity to viruses; engineering cancer resistance; and accelerating vaccine and drug development using human cells and organs.The project aims to build such a synthetic genome and test it in cells in the laboratory within 10 years.The project, which arose from an invitation-only meeting of scientists last month at Harvard University that some critics denounced as too secretive, was unveiled in the journal Science by the experts involved.They acknowledged that their undertaking is controversial and said they would seek public involvement and the consideration of ethical, legal and social implications.The scientists, most of whom work at U.S. academic and other institutions, proposed what they called the Human Genome Project–Write.They said they hoped to get $100 million in public and private funding to launch it this year and expect total costs of less than the $3 billion used for the original Human Genome Project that completely mapped human DNA for the first time in 2003.A synthetic genome would involve using chemicals to create the DNA present in human chromosomes.The new project will include whole-genome engineering of human cell lines and other organisms of agricultural and public health significance, or those needed to interpret human biological functions, the scientists, led by geneticist Jef Boeke of the New York University Langone Medical Center, wrote in the journal Science.They said genome synthesis is a logical extension of the genetic engineering tools that have been used safely by the biotech industry for about four decades.The group also includes experts from Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology, the U.S. government s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Yale University, the University of Edinburgh, Columbia University, the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Washington, Autodesk Bio/Nano Research Group, Bioeconomy Capital and other institutions.Scientists not involved in the project cited potential benefits from the work, including learning the function of vast parts of the genome that remain mysterious and helping better understand how genes are regulated and why there is so much genetic variation among individuals and human populations.The project is not as controversial as some observers might be saying, added University College London professor of synthetic biology John Ward.There is no call to make an entire human being.Critics worry about the unknown effects on new generations and the temptation by future parents to genetically engineer embryos to enhance characteristics such as intelligence or athletic ability.
Baltic, the dog's origin and the Google car. Here are the latest technology news. Eutrophication of the countries around it have caused large areas of dead zones in the Baltic Sea. The journal Science publishes new findings about man's best friend, tamhundens origin. Google takes the next step in developing an autonomous car and learn the vehicle honking independently. Gizmodo closer look at the process of producing an artificial human genome.
Last month, a group of scientists, lawyers, and entrepreneurs gathered in secret to discuss the possibility of creating a synthetic human genome from scratch.Image: Steve Jurvetson It s an ambitious goal that will require substantial improvements in DNA synthesis technologies.The new initiative, co-founded by Harvard Medical School s George Church and NYU Langone Medical Center s Jef Boeke, is an effort to overcome current limitations and develop the tools and knowledge required to synthesise long strands of DNA.Exponential improvements in genome engineering technologies and functional testing provide an opportunity to deepen the understanding of our genetic blueprint and use this knowledge to address many of the global problems facing Humanity.In their Perspectives article, the authors said the project will require continual public involvement and consideration of the ethical, legal and societal implications ELSI from the start, while simultaneously adopting a responsible innovation approach.Even with a framework in place, Palmer worries that the process to figure out if a new technology is desirable, effective, or safe can take years.
A DNA double helix is seen in an undated artist's illustration released by the National Human Genome Research Institute to Reuters on May 15, 2012.The 25 scientists— who hail from institutions like New York University Langone Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, and the University of California— argue that synthesizing the genome is the next step in the field of genetics, and call for public conversation on the topic to discuss, among other issues, the ethics of the controversial idea.As human genome-scale synthesis appears increasingly feasible, a coordinated scientific effort to understand, discuss, and apply large-genome engineering technologies is timely, the scientists write.The biggest goal, the scientists argue, is to dramatically bring down the costs of creating, or writing, very long sections of DNA in the next decade.They say that the ambitious proposal could help improve human health, such as by growing transplantable human organs, and hope to launch this year, estimating that it could cost less than the original project to sequence the human genome.Follow Rob Verger on Twitter: @robverger
Some scientists want to create a synthetic human genome, and their proposal has critics worked up into a frenzy.In a perfect world, this proposed synthetic human genome would be used to grow human organs for transplant, aid humans in developing medications and vaccines for various illnesses, and more.In a less-than-ideal world, critics worry it could also lead to the creation of a human without parents, to designer humans with specific attributes.The collective anticipates needing $100 million in funding which could come from both private and public sources.Some scientists who aren t part of the project have expressed their agreement toward it, saying it could have benefits for future research.Noted by Reuters, Synthetic Biology Professor John Ward of University College London said, The project is not as controversial as some observers might be saying.
MoreIn this photo taken May 9, 2016, Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Washington.Biden is unveiling a public database for clinical data on cancer that aims to help researchers and doctors better tailor new treatments to individuals.The system is designed to increase sharing of information about the gene sequences of tumors and how patients with those tumors responded to specific treatmentsBiden, speaking at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting in Chicago, said recent advances in DNA sequencing technology had allowed researchers to generate vast amounts of new data in a short period of time.The database has emerged as the most tangible component of Biden's cancer "moonshot," a push in his final year in office to double the pace of cancer research toward a cure.In fact, cancer research institutions have significant data-sharing arrangements in place, although Biden and other critics say it's too limited and not happening early enough in the process."It's the quickest way for us to move forward.
Disclosure: Midem paid for my hotel and travel to the conference where I served as a judge for a startup-pitching contest.Making one of his biggest public appearances since returning to Pandora as CEO, Tim Westergren struck a defiant tone — insisting that the company is not for sale and is, in fact, on the cusp of a reinventing itself.Pandora s rise was capped by a big IPO in 2011.But as a public company, Pandora has struggled to show consistent profits and growth.In seeking to quash that idea, Westergren detailed his vision for how Pandora will evolve.Currently, Pandora relies on its music database, known as the Music Genome Project, to create radio stations that are tailored to a listener s preference — based on an artist or style of music.Most users listen to the ad-supported version, but a smaller subset subscribe to Pandora s premium service, Pandora One, which has no adds and allows users to skip more songs.Westergren noted that Pandora has catered to the lean back experience, which allows you to switch something on and just let it go.He argued that part of Pandora s advantage will be the learning it has done through the Genome project.He also responded to claims that Pandora s business model was unfair to artists.
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