Photo: Social Insurance A new EU directive means that all public bodies must ensure that their sites, intranets and applications are available for people with disabilities. Kindergarten Queues, declarations, school choice, information about garbage collection - yes, the Web has become the hub for government information and services to citizens. Today, however, excluded many that are, for example, the blind, visually impaired, have dyslexia or other disabilities because the sites are simply not available to them. But we hope that it will be more focus on the issue, that awareness is raised, says Susanna Laurin CEO of Funkadelic, a company working with the right accessibility issues. Libraries and cultural institutions are often woefully poor, so there is a lot left to do. - It's Funkadelic which developed recommendations for the method to work, for example, that the check should take place once a year and that the tests must be developed so they do not discourage innovation, says Susanna Laurin.
Photo: Social Insurance Kindergarten Queues, declarations, school choice, information about garbage collection - yes, the Web has become the hub for government information and services to citizens. Today, however, excluded many that are, for example, the blind, visually impaired, have dyslexia or other disabilities because the sites are simply not available to them. But recently clubbed a new EU directive which puts pressure on the public sector to make not only their sites, but also intranet and apps available. But we hope that it will be more focus on the issue, that awareness is raised, says Susanna Laurin CEO of Funkadelic, a company working with the right accessibility issues. Libraries and cultural institutions are often woefully poor, so there is a lot left to do. - It's Funkadelic which developed recommendations for the method to work, for example, that the check should take place once a year and that the tests must be developed so they do not discourage innovation, says Susanna Laurin.
We often take for granted how easy it is for us to complete basic tasks just using our hands.Typing out an email or setting up a pot of coffee are things we can do bleary eyed in the morning, but the movements our hands have to make to complete such tasks are truly complex, human skills.That's why for robots to advance to the point where they can take care of our elderly or help clean our homes, it will be necessary for their hands to demonstrate the same level of finesse ours do.Researchers at the University of Washington are inching closer to making that a reality.The highly dexterous, five-fingered robot hand is not only deft in its execution, but can learn from its own mistakes to perform better the next day.The system runs on a form of artificial intelligence called machine learning, which is when machines in this case the robot hand learn to improve over time.Lead author Vikash Kumar, a UW doctoral student in computer science and engineering, compared the hand's learning process to a child going to kindergarten."You go to a class, you are told this is something you will be learning today, and try a lot of things," he told Tech Insider."The hand can move all of its joints, one at a time from end to end, in just 2.44 seconds.It also demonstrates reflexive behavior — meaning the robot hand will respond if you touch it the same way a human would if you tapped them.But right now the hand can only demonstrate the steps necessary to do that one at a time — it can't string them all together to actually make the coffee yet.Kumar said he could see the hand being used to create a robot butler or caregiver for the elderly in the future.Copyright 2016.NOW WATCH: NASA built a robot that looks like Iron Man — and it could one day help build colonies on MarsLoading video...
The products are among the first that LeapFrog has launched since it was acquired by VTech last year for $72 million.The system works with a library of replayable activity books that get kids excited about concepts such as science, technology education and math STEM and social skills, reading comprehension and communication, phonics, and problem solving.The LeapStart Preschool and Pre-Kindergarten system comes with an ergonomically designed stylus for smaller hands and activities for Preschool and Pre-Kindergarten children ages 2-4.The LeapStart Kindergarten and 1st Grade system has a sleeker design and helps children ages 5-7 practice finer pen control.Using the stylus in both systems, kids can tap any page to activate audio responses and play activities.From life skills and daily routines, to space science and coding, the LeapStart library supports core skills integrated with life skills, such as problem solving and critical thinking to help children prepare for the future.Both LeapStart platforms work with all four levels of activity books for complete interchangeability and ability to find just the right level for each set of skills.That s why LeapFrog s focus is on 21st Century learning, a framework that includes the foundational classroom skills kids have always and will always need, as well as life skills they ll need in the future, such as the ability to adapt to changing technology, collaboration skills, and perseverance, said Jody Sherman LeVos, director of learning at LeapFrog, in a statement.Through fun-filled activities and engaging adventures that progress one step at a time, the LeapStart interactive activity book system brings learning to life to provide children with the tools they ll need to thrive in tomorrow s world.
Blue-eyed, pig-tailed sister Bubbles, for one, has kept up with the times by learning to code – a fact that plays a key role in this week s episode of the program, along with Cartoon Network s recent efforts to help foster STEM skills among their young viewers.Over the course of this first season, you re finding out that Bubbles is quite a proficient coder.The episode, which premiers Thursday at 6:30PM ET/PT, will coincide with the launch of Make it Fly, an initiate between the network and MIT Media Lab s Lifelong Kindergarten Group that will provide young viewers tools to code Powerpuff animations and games using the popular educational programming language, Scratch.We re willing to give our IP away in order to put it in kids hands and help them be creators, says Miller.We ll give a suite of assets to Scratch to post and let the kids have their way with them.The Powerpuff Girls is the second Cartoon Network show to launch a Scratch initiative, following the lead of the channel s We Bare Bears, a series based on a popular webcomic.
Todd McLellan s Things Come Apart project is composed of 29 pictures showing the mechanics of items that we use in our daily lives.However, McLellan is meticulous at documenting each and every nut and bolt and composing the final picture to show how the components fit together within the machine.Not forgetting the Brownie Cresta camera, familiar to many a budding photographer in the 1950s.SEE ALSOThe photographs have been rated by users on Imgur, with one commenter saying: I am less impressed that they can take things apart than I am at the aesthetics of how they laid the pieces out.Not only does he take pictures of mechanics, but portraits and landscapes, which he displays in his online portfolio, saying: It all started from a Kindergarten finger-painting class and grew from there.The Things Come Apart series will be on display at an exhibition at the Upcountry History Museum in South Carolina in September.
News provider ITN has signed a £35m deal with Channel 5 - or Five or 5 or whatever it calls itself these days -- to continue providing it with the news it puts on between showings of Kindergarten Cop and ideas too poor for Alan Partridge to bother firing up the dictaphone.Things will change, too, as part of the deal includes relocating the 5 News team from its current base in the Isle of Dogs to ITN's proper newsbase on Gray s Inn Road and completely redesigning the sets in the process.Maybe they will be made to stand up again, or perch on desks, or stand beside a massive CG head of Donald Trump.Channel 5 somehow manages to fit 260 hours of news into its schedules each year, and along with ITV and Channel 4, is one of the key modern earners for ITN.Guardian Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?Make sure to check out our @GizmodoUK Twitter feed, and our Facebook page.
TestingMom.com proved that the pain can be worth the gain when it switched ESPs and started leveraging segmentation.Learning something newMcCurdy wanted to use SendGrid to improve its email deliverability, engagement, and ROI.Parents can enroll in TestingMom.com's email program by visiting the website and entering their name, ZIP Code, email address, and a password to receive 100 practice questions.These questions are designed for children in pre-kindergarten to eighth grade and test kids on various skill sets, including pattern recognition, mathematics, and grammar.The biggest change was that we've been able to identify and segment much more thoroughly than we have in the past and do it on a dynamic level, McCurdy states.You keep hearing that email marketing is dead , or that email marketing doesn't work, he says.
It opens new opportunities for app developers, but also places new demands. Chromebooks are considered to be traditional laptops in comparison with Android mobiles and tablets. Karissa Paddie is responsible for the growth of Polarr that makes an app for photo editing, and runs his own consulting company. Polarr for example, has already Chome OS app. She believes that Google's design language Materials Design becomes important to create apps that work with different devices, from smart phones to laptops. Ana Redmond is focused on educational apps and drives the small company Infinit based app Kindergarten Math for Schools.
It opens new opportunities for app developers, but also places new demands. Chromebooks are considered to be traditional laptops in comparison with Android mobiles and tablets. Karissa Paddie is responsible for the growth of Polarr that makes an app for photo editing, and runs his own consulting company. Polarr for example, has already Chome OS app. She believes that Google's design language Materials Design becomes important to create apps that work with different devices, from smart phones to laptops. Ana Redmond is focused on educational apps and drives the small company Infinit based app Kindergarten Math for Schools.
It looks like Apple will sell the iPhone 7 in a new color when it arrives later this year.Earlier rumors from MacOtakara suggested Apple would release a dark blue iPhone.It would certainly make sense given how Apple already sells a rose gold a.k.a.Note that none of these rumors confirm any actual details about Apple's next iPhone.Everyone, including us at Tech Insider, have to wait until Apple's iPhone event in September to get the official details.EXCLUSIVE FREE REPORT:25 Big Tech Predictions by BI Intelligence.More from Tech Insider:This beautiful Japanese kindergarten is made of shipping containersHere's the gorgeous new trailer for 'Star Trek: Beyond'8 details you might have missed in the 'Game of Thrones' finaleMicrosoft billionaire Paul Allen is on a mission to save the world s sharks, and he s found some lurking in unexpected placesThis tech exec thinks one main belief about self-driving cars is 'bulls---' ETSY NOW WATCH: You can hack your iPhone to make the logo glow like the one on a MacBookLoading video...
In March 2016, Forbes reported there were 159 technology billionaires, and four of the 10 richest people in the world made their money in the tech sector.We believe there are opportunities for these technology developers to play a differential role in philanthropy — one that brings together their ability to invest wisely and their acumen for using technology to change the world.Which types of technology-enabled interventions and tools most help to support healthy development and are worth big philanthropic bets is the subject of our latest research.The early childhood development crisis facing the United StatesNationwide, 5.8 million children, from birth to age five, are not on track to succeed when they begin kindergarten.They lack the cognitive skills, physical development and social and emotional maturity to succeed in a formal learning environment.
Cubs playing in the kindergarten at the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda.There are plenty of ways to brighten up a train journey, such as a good book, a few calming tunes or even a short, invigorating nap.A new subway line in China has instead opted for a slightly more unorthodox method of cheering up its passengers with pandas.On 31 July, 2016, the provincial capital of South West China's Sichuan province celebrated the debut of its fourth subway line and in doing so treated the first wave of commuters and tourists to Chengdu's 'Panda Train' - an otherwise regular subway train that has adorned its walls, chairs and even hand-holds with panda-themed prints and designs in honour of the region's much-loved black and white bears.With the exception of the usual subway maps and advertisements, the train's carriage walls are decorated with cartoon panda faces, while a central strip on the floor is covered in pink paw prints.The panda-style seating ranges from a subtle print on the arm rest to comfy-looking carriage chairs that go full-panda.
Much has been written about the ambitions of AltSchool, a San Francisco-based startup that s aiming to change the way that school children learn.Its big idea, broadly, is that personalized learning is far more effective than the standardized education that most students are stuck with today.As important, personalized learning is scalable, believes AltSchool, which operates seven small private schools – five of them in San Francisco, one in Palo Alto, and one in Brooklyn – and, sorry to disappoint some of you, doesn t intend to open many more.Instead, after several years of working closely with its kindergarten-through-eighth-grade students and iterating on its personalized learning approach, it s gearing up to license its findings to other schools that want to embrace more individualized techniques but don t have $133 million to test what works and what doesn t. That s how much AltSchool has raised so far from its investors .We talked earlier today with founder and CEO and former Googler Max Ventilla to get the full update.TC: You re opening another of your own schools in Lower Manhattan this fall, and another in Chicago early next year.
Architects who design kindergartens are powerful people — it's up to them to decide what kind of first impression a child has about school.The best designs use wide-open spaces and bright colors that naturally compel kids to explore.From Thailand's elegant Kensington International School to Germany's cat-shaped Kindergarten Wolfartsweier, here are some of the best places for kids to start school on the right foot.
A nursery school in Håbo municipality was cleaner without the cleaning chemicals.It was cleaner at the preschool when mikrofiberdukar and ultrapure water was used in place of cleaning chemicals.Håbo municipality wanted to reduce children's exposure to toxic substances, and decided to investigate if it is possible to clean the nursery without chemicals.the Background was a study of the French mikrofibertillverkaren Decitex in cooperation with the Toulon hospital, which had been shown to a chemical free cleaning method can work better.At the end of last year, started Håbo municipality, its städprojekt in Råbydals kindergarten.the First carried out the so-called ATP-measurements, which give an indication of bakterieantal, before and after the regular cleaning with chemical cleaners.
From classroom cleaning supplies to computers for students to use in the classroom, to underwater robots, public school teachers throughout the U.S. are turning to crowdfunding.When government entities can t provide the funds, teachers increasingly open their own wallets or go online, according to the Associated Press.A crowdfunded underwater robot for a classroom science project makes the point that even the best-funded schools use crowdfunding.In the majority of instances, however, teachers are looking for help to supply the basics.In the case of a kindergarten classroom in Philadelphia s Roosevelt Elementary School, teacher Shannon Raferty has a $200 budget for supplies for the entire school year.Rafferty spends $100 to $150 of her own money from each paycheck, reports the AP, but it s not enough.
There s something both interesting and strange about mimicking the function of a human brain that we feel the need to explore — how crazy is it to build a machine that can beat out the human brain in a game of chess?Of course, as applied to today s chatbots, artificial intelligence is still in its infancy.But don t take that the wrong way: Today s bots can still offer a great deal of utility for businesses and consumers.Messaging platforms like Facebook Messenger, WeChat, and Kik are making it easier than ever for brands and businesses to have a presence where millions of users are already spending time.Qualities like natural language processing, voice recognition, automatic speech recognition, and question and intent analysis are components that will eventually lead to brands building smarter bots that can offer more sophisticated — and human-like — digital experiences for their customers.To help frame where bots are today and where we re headed, we ve broken bot intelligence down into a paradigm we re all familiar with: school.We would consider most of today s chatbots to be at the kindergarten level — only capable of answering very specific and predetermined questions or identifying a set of keywords.Because these bots rely on a basic if/then style logic, they can t handle unplanned paths or predict outcomes.For example, Nordstrom s chatbot curates purchase suggestions based on items the user has browsed or purchased in the past.Based on what is selected, the bot will adjust the content in its feed.This type of bot, while useful, cannot adapt to more advanced requests.
Gone are the days when girl scouts will be known only for their cookies.Members will soon be able to earn badges for learning hacking and cybersecurity skills.Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has partnered with security firm Palo Alto Networks to offer the first national Girl Scout Cybersecurity patches for girls in grades K–12 (kindergarten to grade 12, or primary and secondary ages).In total, there will be 18 cybersecurity badges released and the first will be rolled out across the US in September 2018."Our mission to prevent cyberattacks and restore trust in the digital age is only achievable if we make meaningful investments not just in technology but also in people," said Mark D McLaughlin, chairman and chief executive officer, Palo Alto Networks."Our collaboration with Girl Scouts of the USA to develop curriculum for the first-ever national Cybersecurity badges will positively influence the future of our industry by helping build tomorrow's diverse and innovative team of problem solvers equipped to counter emerging cyberthreats."
the School is the continuation of a sizzling hot market for the it giants.Now, IBM and Apple together an Ipadapp that will help the teachers to get an overall picture of their students.Ipadappen – IBM Watson elements for educators – are meant to be used from kindergarten and throughout the school year.In the app are taken indivduella curricula for students.They are based on the skills and interests of the pupils of teachers registered and processed with the help of IBM's supercomputer Watson, writes our us sister site CIO.in practical terms, teachers are able to get suggestions on what type of tasks at a specific student need in order to best acquire, for example, algebra.
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