Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale.Airlines who force passengers to check their bags at the gate should pay out an automatic $500 to those affected.Since that’s not the case, we have another option.Everlane’s $98 Weekender is a stylish, durable, reasonably-priced, water-resistant bag that definitely fits in that overhead compartment.It sports real leather, twill fabrication, and gunmetal feet, and should still hold enough clothes for, ahem, a weekend.
Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale.Airlines who force passengers to check their bags at the gate should pay out an automatic $500 to those affected.Since that’s not the case, we have another option.Everlane’s $98 Weekender is a stylish, durable, reasonably-priced, water-resistant bag that definitely fits in that overhead compartment.It sports real leather, twill fabrication, and gunmetal feet, and should still hold enough clothes for, ahem, a weekend.
No-one likes doing mathematics.Actually that s not true, some people do, but for those of us that haven t taken that part of our brains for a walk in a while it can be more than just a chore.Well now help is at hand in the form of Mathpix, an ingenious app which uses your iPhone s camera to look at handwritten equations and then work them out instantly.MathpixOpening up the app it looks just like any normal camera, but point it at an equation and you ll start to see the magic happen.Now some of these formula can be pretty processor intensive we re talking more than that calculator app on your phone and so while the app does the image-taking the actual working out happens on a server up in the cloud.The app was created by Stanford student Nico Jimenez and fellow graduates and high schoolers Paul Ferrell, Michael Lee and August Trollback.
Over the course of his presidency, Barack Obama has made clear his dedication to STEM education among young Americans.Now, the leader is proving just how much faith he has in the innovative minds of America s posterity by forming a new advisory committee comprised of young people.Called the Kids Science Advisors, the purpose of the new committee is to encourage young scientists to share ideas about the future of science.Legette suggested that the President employ a younger science advisor, and lo and behold, Obama agreed.The establishment of the new committee comes at a time when the U.S. lags notably behind other developed nations in terms of STEM education.They don t consider age a barrier.
Facebook just acquired Two Big Ears, a UK-based virtual reality audio startup, for its immersive audio technology.The company's mission is to assist developers replicate how sound works in a three-dimensional space using a combination of speaker and sound processing technologies.Two Big Ears want to "make VR audio succeed across all devices and platforms," which is great news for developers who don't want to be locked into developing only for Facebook and Oculus, which is owned by the social network.Developers previously using Two Big Ears's 3Dception for Games will have to jump to the new combined platform, as it's no longer a separate product.The team is working closely with Oculus to ensure its unified platform will work for all types of VR development.Don't fret, existing Pro customers, as you'll continue receiving support for the next 12 months.
Malware and keyloggers are better, we think they're sayingWhile the FBI, in the person of James Comey, continues its campaign to persuade the tech sector that mathematics isn't that big a thing and therefore backdoors are feasible, The European Union Agency for Network and Information Security ENISA and Europol have tip-toed around the issue, issuing a joint statement that both opposes and supports breaking encryption.Back in February and speaking for itself alone, ENISA was clear about the dangers of undermining encryption.Stating what's obvious to everybody except the FBI's lobbyist-in-chief, the statement emphasises that criminals can easily circumvent such weakened mechanisms and make use of the existing knowledge on cryptography to develop or buy their own solutions without backdoors or key escrow .Noting that investigations do, after all, go better with access to suspects' communications, ENISA and Europol agree that For the investigation and disruption of crimes, it is important to use all possible and lawfully permitted means to get access to any relevant information, even if the suspect encrypted it .Regulation and bug-sharing seem to be on their mind, although the statement tiptoes around the latter: it would be worthwhile to collect and share best practices to circumvent encryption already in use in some jurisdictions.All of this would seem to be evidence that Europe is moving further away from America in the encryption debate, except that the ENISA/Europol statement indulges in law enforcement bet-hedging right at the end, by which time only the bloody-minded are still reading.
From food to human tissue, 3D printing is going to change the world as we know it, but what is the real technology beyond all the tech jargon?3D printing or additive manufacturing AM is the capability of printing three dimensional objects, which can take any shape, form or size.According to the Standard Terminology for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials ASTM , there are seven categories for 3D printing processes.The process is controlled by a computer-aided manufacturing CAM software package.Here, a high intensity laser fuses small particles of any given material, from plastic, metal, ceramic to glass, into the desired end-shape.As for sheet lamination, metal, paper or polymer can be used.
Fantem, the company behind the soon-to-be-released Vitrima 3D lens for GoPro Hero cameras, is definitely in former camp.As far as consumer 3D recording solutions go, the Vitrima is one of the more elegant options – although, elegant is perhaps too strong a word in this context.The downside, however, is that there really isn t a way to watch the video in 2D, unless you enjoy seeing the same shot twice, in side-by-side vertical videos.The very nature of the Vitrima lens means it will likely remain relegated to a niche market, but its low price could help it end up on quite a few birthday and holiday wish lists.At the very least, if you own a GoPro and a VR headset, it will be another trick up your sleeve to impress your friends and family.The Vitrima lens should be available in mid-June.
School plans, NASA and Apple car. Here are the latest technology news. They have also developed efficient simulations to predict where a hurricane will move. Swedish elementary school students to become sharper in math, the government is proposing an extra hour mathematics teaching per week for all elementary school students. But in deep water corals are doing better, it reports Vetenskapsradion. Thousands of employees suffer when Microsoft put its mobile venture, is there any hope for Windows Phone ?, wonder IDG.se.
First, Elon Musk's SpaceX disrupted the aerospace industry with rockets that were designed to be reused.SpaceX's live launch webcasts from the company's Mission Control in Hawthorne, Calif., are becoming must-watch events for space nerds and common folk alike.The events are an equally informative and entertaining crash course in STEM science, technology, engineering, and mathematics topics with a heavy dose of rocket propulsion and flip maneuvers thrown in.The highly produced webcasts began in late December with the Orbcomm-2 mission when SpaceX launched Falcon 9 and successfully landed the rocket's first stage—on land—for the first time.There was even a cameo appearance by Wait But Why's Tim Urban.The palpable excitement emanating from within SpaceX is part of what makes the webcasts so engaging for so many people."Educating and engaging more people about space will help us to make faster progress, and each launch is an opportunity to do that."
If you think you had a hard time filling out pages of algebra at school, spare a thought for the three mathematicians who have just published the world s largest ever proof.What the hell is that, I hear you scream?The team used the University of Texas s Stampede supercomputer to churn through all the combinations, utilising 800 processors over the course of two days to create 200TB of data.These kinds of computer-aided proofs are increasingly common in mathematics, though there is some debate over whether they re maths proofs in the truest sense.Still, most mathematicians can probably agree that the quantity of data required to reach this particular solution was simply to large for any human to every generate.arXiv via Nature
If you think you had a hard time filling out pages of algebra at school, spare a thought for the three mathematicians who have just published the world s largest ever proof.What the hell is that, I hear you scream?The answer was yes up until 7,824.The team used the University of Texas s Stampede supercomputer to churn through all the combinations, utilizing 800 processors over the course of two days to create 200TB of data.These kinds of computer-aided proofs are increasingly common in mathematics, though there is some debate over whether they re math proofs in the truest sense.Still, most mathematicians can probably agree that the quantity of data required to reach this particular solution was simply to large for any human to every generate.
Wylie Beckert for Quanta MagazineWith a surprising new proof, two young mathematicians have found a bridge across the finite-infinite divide, helping at the same time to map this strange boundary.Rather, it separates two kinds of mathematical statements: finitistic ones, which can be proved without invoking the concept of infinity, and infinitistic ones, which rest on the assumption—not evident in nature—that infinite objects exist.That s why it s so interesting.In the new proof, Keita Yokoyama, 34, a mathematician at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, and Ludovic Patey, 27, a computer scientist from Paris Diderot University, pin down the logical strength of RT22—but not at a level most people expected.And yet, Yokoyama and Patey found that it is finitistically reducible : It s equivalent in strength to a system of logic that does not invoke infinity.The result of Patey and Yokoyama is indeed a breakthrough, said Andreas Weiermann of Ghent University in Belgium, whose own work on RT22 unlocked one step of the new proof.
There's no doubt that vinyl has been enjoying a wave of popularity for the last few years, especially as super special editions of artists' albums and new soundtracks.Now Star Wars is getting in on the artistic packages, with a new vinyl release of the soundtrack for The Force Awakens.But while many records use unique or exclusive artwork in the packaging, Star Wars has placed it directly on the vinyl itself, in the form of 3D holograms.They hired holographic artist Tristan Duke, known for creating similar etched artwork on the record in Jack White's Lazaretto Ultra LP.As the records spin, if you look at them from the right angle, you can see wireframe forms of the Star Wars ships floating and rotating.Buyers can expect to pay $50 when it's released on June 17th through Disney Music Emporium and Amazon.
Back in the early 1960s, physicist Richard Feynman remarked that the centre of the Earth had to be a little younger than the crust, since it would experience gravitational time dilation.Now, boffins from two Danish universities have put a value to that difference, and while they agree with his hypothesis, they've corrected his estimate of the difference: while Feynman thought it would be a couple of days , a full calculation suggests it's two-and-a-half years.The paper is here at Arxiv and has been accepted by the European Journal of Physics.The paper actually runs two calculations for Earth, with a realistic model of earth yielding the 2.5-year difference in age.The same mathematics works just fine for the sun as well, except that because of its size, mass, and age, the core-to-surface time dilation is much bigger.As the paper says: The pedagogical value of this discussion is to show students that any number or observation, no matter who brought it forward, must be critically examined – especially since nobody had thought to question Feynman's remark until now.
TV series The Big Bang Theory is about a bunch of scientists, the physicists Sheldon Cooper and Leonard Hofstadter in the center. Should any of them can not sue David Saltzberg expect to receive corrections, among the viewers are many who are knowledgeable in mathematics and physics. In the series, David Saltzberg also been able to contribute their knowledge in physics in a more concrete way. The reason that David Saltzberg visiting Sweden is that the team behind The Big Bang Theory awarded the newly instituted prize The Torsten Wiesel Midnight Sun Award see box. - If you look just a little bit, you might get that impression, but the roles have more depth than that, he says, and points out that the series is now gone for almost ten years. Self he hopes the series will capture young people's interest in science, as he himself once became inspired.
Big Blue's colleges boosted with another $4.2 millionWhy is the Liberal party promising money to recreate vocational training on an American model, when Australia used to have a working vocational training system of its own?The current leader of the Liberal Party is willing to sound enthusiastic at least long enough to promise AU$4.6 million to expand the pilot to 12 schools – even before the two existing pilot schools have had a chance to turn out graduates.In Australia, P-TECH is pitched with a focus on STEM science, technology, maths and engineering , which means it aligns with the political-educational obsession de jour.The model is certainly beloved of the tech press and business press, but there's been little by way of any critical evaluation by journalists.As The Economist explained in 2015: Most of the pupils in Brooklyn s P-Tech are the first in their families to go to college.From The Economist again: Unlike most American high-schools, it is a six-year programme instead of the usual four .
Dr. Frances Arnold is the first woman ever to win the prestigious Millennium Technology Prize.Arnold, 59, won the prize for her discoveries that launched a field known as directed evolution, according to a statement issued by Technology Academy Finland, the organization that awards the prize.I believe that some women still face external barriers, but other barriers are more self-imposed: lack of confidence or desire to compete and a misunderstanding of what science and technology can contribute to society.Full of brilliant young people who want to change the world.I will use some of it to invest in work done at Provivi, a startup I cofounded with two of my former students, Peter Meinhold and Pedro Coelho.Provivi is developing the non-toxic alternatives to pesticides, which I think is such an important goal.
STEM is fast becoming a business buzzword - CBR looks at the origins of the acronym and what it means for businesses today.STEM is the acronym referring to the academic principles of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.The acronym was first used after a meeting on science education held at the US National Science Foundation NSF , when Dr Peter Faletra suggested a change from the old acronym SMET Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology to STEM.UK organisations such as the Stemettes and WISE actively lobby for more women to be schooled and hired in the STEM fields, using research to highlight the inequality of today's workforce and the perception of STEM among parents and children.Further research from WISE found that women make up 14.4% of the UK STEM workforce, with women working in ICT only making up 17.5% of the total workforce in that sector.Commenting on STEM as one of the key issues facing UK businesses, Regina Moran, CEO of Fujitsu UK, told CBR: "As the leader of a major corporate, the change that I would love to see in UK tech is greater coordination on the key issues that we are facing - digital skills and diversity.
Completing a game of Super Mario Brothers is the mathematic equivalent of solving complex mathematical calculations, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.The researchers broke the task of completing a level in the Nintendo version of Super Mario Brothers down to a polynomial equation, factoring possible moves and the location of monsters on the level map."In this case, we prove that the game is solvable in polynomial time, assuming levels are explicitly encoded; on the other hand, if levels can be represented using run-length encoding, then the problem is weakly NP-hard even if levels have only constant height, as in the video games ," wrote researchers Erik Demaine, Giovanni Viglietta and Aaron Williams.They found that solving those equations based on the game levels meets NP complexity and, theoretically, levels for the game could be designed that would qualify as PSPACE complexity problems.The paper notes that the commercial versions of the game don't carry levels of that complexity.While the original NES games only contained levels designed by Nintendo, user-designed levels made with the Super Mario Maker tool have proven popular with players and have led to the creation of increasingly difficult levels.
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