Boris Johnson is ignoring “an epidemic of misogyny”, Labour said, as the party unveiled its own strategy to end violence against women and girls. A government led by Keir Starmer would introduce whole life sentences for people who rape, abduct and murder strangers. It would also make misogyny a hate crime and jail those who identify sex offence victims. The policies form part of a detailed plan by Labour’s justice team, which has been published after the government failed to set out new legislation last week. Boris Johnson has been under pressure to act in the wake of the killing of Sarah Everard, but the Queen’s Speech outlining the PM’s agenda for this parliament, mentioned future “proposals” and no specific Bill. Everard’s kidnap and murder took place as the 33-year-old was walking home from a friend’s flat in March. It sparked an outpouring of anger and fresh demands for action.  Labour’s plan includes making street harassment a specific offence and tougher sentences for stalking, rape and domestic killings. The ‘rape clause’ which forces women to disclose they have been raped to claim some benefits for a third child would end. There would also be “criminal sanctions” for tech executives who fail to remove misogynistic content from platforms. Labour’s strategy to end violence against women and girlsWhole life sentences for those who rape, abduct and murder strangersA new offence of street sexual harassmentTougher sentences for rape, stalking and domestic murder, and review sentencing for all domestic abuseMisogyny made a hate crime Criminal sanctions for tech executives who fail to remove misogynistic content from platformsPrison for those who identify an accuser of a sexual offenceA survivor’s support package to improve court experiencesTraining for teachers to help identify, respond to and support child victims of domestic abuse Funding improved support for Black, Asian, minority ethnic, LGBT+, disabled and migrant women.Scrapping the so-called ‘rape clause’ attached to some welfare claimsEnding the five-week wait for UC, to ensure domestic abuse survivors can access the support they needThe strategy would also include training on intersectionality and the experiences of Black, Asian, minority ethnic, LGBT+, disabled and migrant women targeted for violence and abuse.Shadow justice secretary, David Lammy, said: “The Conservatives are failing to protect women and girls from violent criminals, which should be one of the first duties of any government.“With record low conviction rates for perpetrators of sexual violence and an epidemic of misogyny that makes women and girls feel unsafe, this government is treating victims of violence as an afterthought.” Data from the Crown Prosecution Service last year revealed the number of people prosecuted and convicted for rape fell to the lowest level since records began, despite reports of rape doubling. Victims’ commissioner Vera Baird said in her annual report that the figures amount to the effective “decriminalisation of rape”. The PM is yet to publish a strategy to tackle violence against women and girls.Safeguarding minister Victoria Atkins said it will be published “later this year” and will take into account “hundreds of thousands of responses” from a public survey.“Violence against women and girls is an abhorrent crime that this government is doing everything in its power to address,” the Tory MP added.“Our landmark domestic abuse act strengthens protections for victims, whilst also tackling perpetrators at the earliest stage to ensure they feel the full force of the law.”Shadow domestic violence and safeguarding minister, Jess Phillips, however, said: “There have been too many warm words and far too little action from this government.”A Home Office spokesperson said: “Protecting women and girls from violence and abuse is a key priority for the government.“The police, crime, sentencing and courts bill will make sure that serious sexual offenders – including rapists – spend longer behind bars.“It will also further strengthen the regime for managing those who pose a risk of sexual harm, including by improving preventative tools such as sexual harm prevention and sexual risk orders.”Related...Watchdog Exonerates Police Over Sarah Everard Protest – After Speaking Only To Police‘Revenge Porn’ Ruined My Teen Years. Now I’m Fighting BackJess Philips Accuses Government Of 'Failing Young People' Over Sexual Abuse In Schools
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Joe Exotic – who rose to prominence last year as the subject of the Netflix documentary Tiger King – has announced he’s been diagnosed with prostate cancer.Currently serving a 22-year prison sentence for charges including killing abuse and hiring someone to murder big cat enthusiast Carole Baskin, Exotic shared his diagnosis on social media earlier this week.A post on his Twitter page read: “John Phillips has received my medical records from FMC Fort Worth and my PSA count came back very high for prostate cancer. The prison has approved testing to verify what stage it is in.“My body is tired, I have lost a tremendous amount of weight, the mouth sores are out of control.”He further outlined his symptoms in a series of follow-up tweets, urging Joe Biden to “make this right and sign that pardon that Trump left behind so I can go home and get proper medical care and proper food”.Exotic – whose legal name is Joseph Maldonado-Passage – is currently onto the third year of his 22-year sentence.He was found guilty of two counts of hiring someone to kill Carole Baskin, eight counts of falsifying wildlife records and nine counts of violating the Endangered Species Act by killing tigers and selling some across state lines. Last year, he made an appeal for Biden’s predecessor, Donald Trump, to pardon him, to no avail.Tiger King debuted on Netflix in March 2020 at a time when much of the world was going into lockdown, and quickly became a hit on the streaming platform.READ MORE:Tiger King Star Joe Exotic's Husband Dillon Passage Seeking A DivorceTiger King's Carole Baskin 'Relieved' Joe Exotic Did Not Receive Pardon From TrumpTiger King's Joe Exotic Forced To Hand Zoo Over To Carole Baskin Following Legal Battle
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Perhaps unappreciated by many entertainment-focused businesses, however, we’ve seen a boom in the podcast industry as well.It’s enough to see upfronts for podcast advertising now becoming a normal practice.BLAKE & WANG P.A Entertainment Attorney Los Angeles investigate further.The impact of the podcastWhile streaming has been the de facto winner of the entertainment wars over the unprecedented time in human history we have recently lived through, the podcast has, in many significant ways, been the runner-up.We’ve even seen one true-crime podcast attract significant attention and accolades for helping to reveal new evidence and drive arrests in a 25-year old murder case.As with streaming, the podcast offers a format that can be produced at high quality with smaller production teams, yet offers a versatile and easily adaptable broadcast.With regards to advertising, we’ve even seen advertisers opt to be less squeamish about advertising alongside hard news podcasts, vs the same genre in other formats.This growth is typically linked to an ‘audio renaissance’, with innovative ad tech, spikes in listener interest, and the evolution of premium content services all driving it.
Dancing is still off the cards at weddings in England after May 17, the cabinet office has confirmed to HuffPost UK – and people are furious. As couples and wedding suppliers anxiously await the publishing of Stage 3 guidelines on weddings, a government spokesperson told HuffPost dancing will “be advised against” due to the increased risk of transmission from sustained physical and close contact.The only exception to this is the couple’s first dance. Dance floors and other spaces used for dancing must remain closed under the current regulations, unless repurposed to facilitate additional customer seating and enable social distancing.HuffPost understands that the advice against dancing at weddings is guidance and will not be legislated. Full guidelines for wedding venues will be published later this week, ahead of May 17.Emma Freeman, 37 from Northamptonshire, has already postponed her wedding four times and is angry that group exercise classes and live performances can resume, but weddings still face such tight restrictions. “It’s hard to describe the treatment of the wedding sector and couples as anything other than blatant discrimination,” she tells HuffPost UK. “As of Monday, I can sit inside a pub, hug my friends and kiss them in greeting, but we can’t do that at a wedding? What will it take to be heard? Disguise our weddings as Zumba classes? It’s beyond a joke now.” Alexandra Morris, who’s due to get married on June 19, just before the restrictions are expected to lift on June 21, is equally frustrated. “It is illogical, insensitive and irresponsible to say that weddings cannot have dancing when their own report states that weddings are not a risk,” says the 26-year-old, from Norwich. “You can be at a sweaty concert dancing with your entire congregation, but not outside at your wedding reception. Where is the sense? As a community, we feel incredibly let down. Not just about the dancing, but about the fact that Boris has clearly not listened to any of our concerns.”The news also comes to a blow to those working in the wedding industry, who’ve had their livelihoods disrupted for more than a year. Jessie Westwood, a wedding planner, director of Studio Sorores and co-founder of the What About Weddings campaign group, says there’s “no justifiable reason” why such heavy restrictions should remain in place at weddings.  As a community, we feel incredibly let down.Alexandra Morris, who’s due to get married on June 19“We are now in the situation where a group of people can attend a Zumba class inside together but not dance at a wedding, where a father can hug his child outside their venue but not walk together down the aisle, and where a one night stand after a boozy night in the pub is fine but wedding guests are still told to wear masks during a ceremony with friends and family,” says Westwood.“For more than a year, we’ve been told that weddings have been restricted because of ‘hugging and kissing’. However this week, the UK government has been trumpeting the return of common sense with ‘responsible’ hugging and, crucially, their own report categorically states that there is no increased risk of transmission of Covid-19 in hospitality settings or at private events.” Bernadette Chapman, director of the UK Alliance of Wedding Planners, feels “incredibly strongly that the government has disregarded the wedding industry”.“We were the first industry to shut down and we’re the last industry to reopen,” she tells HuffPost. “It’s ludicrous when you think weddings are the one area where we can really track and trace – we know exactly who is at that wedding.“It doesn’t make sense when they’re talking about festivals reopening and theme parks and museums. And for goodness sake, football stadiums! It’s okay for football supporters to drink beforehand, to chant, to jump up and down, but we can’t have dancing at a wedding?” How to entertain guests without dancing  The latest news may cause some couples to consider postponing again, but there will be plenty of others – like Alexandra Morris and her partner – who don’t want to wait any longer to get married. For couples in this boat, Chapman recommends thinking outside the box to ensure guests still have a good time. “After the year we’ve had, it’s time to bring the fun back,” she says. “Couples may want to stretch out the meal, so it’s a bit like what you would have in the mediterranean – smaller courses stretching out how long it takes to be served.“Then, you can think about table entertainment, from comedians to table magicians. You could also take it a step further and organise activities like quizzes, bingo, murder mystery, something where the tables compete with each other. Fun is the ultimate word.”  And remember, some of your guests might be relieved at the lack of dancing. Don’t panic. Related...I Danced With A Bunch Of Strangers On Zoom. You Should Try ItHow Kate's Wedding Dress Inspired A Thousand MarriagesFor Hug's Sake: How To Have A Proper ‘Cautious Cuddle’How Kate's Wedding Dress Inspired A Thousand MarriagesStop Judging Us For Wanting A Big Wedding
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It's not an instant classic like Clue, but it's fun, very solid indie fare.
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Do you know that stress could affect the chances of IVF success?Are you undergoing an IVF procedure?Then you need to know that stress is one of the factors that could determine chances of success in your IVF procedure.People are used to living conditions with hectic schedules and career challenges, always running towards an unknown target, ignoring the resultant stress that develops without their knowledge.Stress is not dangerous but might alter the body's response to the treatment, especially when undergoing infertility treatment.Here are a few tips to reduce stress when undergoing an IVF procedure• Trust your doctor and simply follow his / her advice.Talk to the doctor and find out.Do not fret over it and create unwanted complexities in your head.• Avoid watching mega serials, soap operas, family melodrama TV serials, horror movies, murder mysteries etc.Confirm with your doctor as to what exercises are safe to give the best results.• Eat freshly cooked healthy food containing fruits and vegetables.• Keep an eye on your BMI ..it could affect your fertility status.• We know that you can't wait to know the good news, but there's a specific time during the IVF procedure which is advised by your doctor to take your pregnancy test.
As the results came in, the pattern was clear and, for Labour activists, painfully familiar. Keir Starmer, the man elected to stop the bleed in the party’s so-called red wall, was instead presiding over yet more red ruin. Boris Johnson’s Conservatives had not only captured the totemic Westminster seat of Hartlepool – a Labour constituency since its inception – but a slew of English council seats from County Durham to Dudley were turning from red to blue.Despite a scramble to manage expectations by Labour HQ, there could be no glossing over the fact these were terrible results, with Starmer rejected by much of its previous working-class base. Starmer did not quell speculation he will embark on a reshuffle in response to the drubbing, telling reporters on Friday his party has “lost the trust of working people” and he will do “whatever it takes” to restore it. So, who might he look to in order to shake things up? Here are some of the options. On The Way Up Wes Streeting Viewed as a rising star hungry to do battle with the Tory benches, the shadow schools minister grew up in a council flat in Stepney and went on to study at Cambridge. A moderate and vocal critic of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, Streeting has become a close ally of Starmer’s in recent months, repeatedly taking to the airwaves to defend the party’s new direction.As the country recovers from coronavirus, Labour may see the Tories as vulnerable on social mobility and the widening opportunity gap between rich and poor. It is for this reason, many tip Streeting to take the education brief from Kate Green, who some feel has failed to land blows on Gavin Williamson despite the A-Levels fiasco and a series of cuts.  “Wes would be Gavin Williamson’s worst nightmare,” said one Labour source. It is also possible, however, that Streeting’s confident media performances could be placed in a more strategic role, such as shadowing Michael Gove’s Cabinet Office role.  His previous support for the People’s Vote campaign could hamper his chances, however, with Starmer keen to draw a line under Brexit. Rachel Reeves Widely tipped to replace Annaliese Dodds as shadow chancellor, Leeds West MP Reeves is one of the few shadow ministers with previous frontbench experience. Seen as on the right of the party, Reeves served in Ed Miliband’s shadow cabinet and is seen as having won trust and respect among those the left by leading the campaign against “Tory sleaze”.  Though still controversial with some in her party because of past comments on benefits, her frequent media appearances are testament to Starmer’s faith in her abilities. A former economist for the Bank of England and British Embassy in Washington, Reeves is not thought to have any competition if Starmer is searching for a new face to take on Rishi Sunak at the despatch box. Jess Phillips  One of Starmer’s most high-profile frontbenchers, the shadow domestic violence minister led party calls for action after Sarah Everard’s murder. The Birmingham Yardley MP has a forthright style and, though Starmer may view her as something of a loose cannon, he is said to highly prize her work campaigning on homelessness, domestic killings and violence against women. Phillips, who was the moderates’ candidate for leadership when Corbyn stepped down, is also a strong communicator, both online and on broadcast, and comfortable with the “red wall” voters Starmer fears the party has lost touch with. The 39-year-old has previously voiced an ambition to be home secretary, which is a brief Starmer may consider for her, but possible alternatives may be shadow equalities secretary. She may also be considered for the role of shadow employment rights secretary should Starmer wish to move Corbyn ally Andy McDonald.On the way out? Anneliese DoddsStarmer’s choice for shadow chancellor, the most important appointment for any leader, has attracted regular criticism. Her allies point out her difficult task in facing Rishi Sunak while the occupant of Number 11 has handed out huge sums of cash via the furlough scheme and other Covid support. But many feel Dodds has failed to nail her opponent when he was weak on free school meals cuts, the Eat Out To Help Out debacle and the Greensill Capital scandal. Prevaricating over whether Labour would back a wealth tax and hiring a former advisor of John McDonnell’s also fanned concerns about whether she was suitable. Demoting his own pick for such a crucial job would inevitably invite criticism of Starmer’s judgement, however, and Dodds is well-liked and viewed as knowledgeable among MPs. But, equally, if Starmer refused to consider a move, he may face the charge of tinkering around the edges. Jonathan AshworthThe shadow health secretary has been in post since 2016 and was appointed by Corbyn, despite not sharing the former leader’s left-wing outlook. Sources have suggested Starmer is keen for a reset on health policy, especially as the NHS is traditionally Labour’s strongest campaign issue and Johnson’s approach to social care may soon be a key dividing line. Others have underlined that sacking Ashworth, whose current knowledge of the brief is likely to be unrivalled, during the pandemic would be a misstep. Questions over whether Ashworth has briefed against Starmer and his staff to journalists have been swirling, however. “He is acting like he has already lost his job,” said one source. Liz Kendall, Justin Madders, Rosena Allin-Khan and Lucy Powell are among the names touted as his replacement. Emily ThornberryRelations between the shadow trade secretary and Starmer are thought to have been rocky in recent months. Starmer demoted his leadership rival from her role as shadow foreign secretary last year and there are suggestions he could go further. Despite her combative scrutiny of Liz Truss, Thornberry has been increasingly sidelined in recent months, rarely, if ever, appearing on the media. Her previous comments about the St George’s flag are also seen by Starmer’s allies as undermining the party’s attempts to appear more patriotic. It is possible she is offered an alternative role as shadow leader of the Commons, should long-serving Valerie Vaz wish to move on, but it’s not clear Thornberry would accept. Starmer might consider bringing in a well-known “big beast” as her replacement, such as former shadow foreign secretary Hilary Benn. What else could Starmer do?Starmer will be desperate to show working class voters he is listening and may look to boost the role of Wigan MP and shadow foreign secretary Lisa Nandy. Her policy work on reviving the party’s offer to towns is highly rated and sources say he is keen for her to be seen on broadcast media more often. A sideways move to the Home Office role, replacing Nick Thomas-Symonds, to shadow Priti Patel may be on the cards. It would see Nandy front and centre of efforts to make the party credible on issues like crime and immigration, something vital to securing support in the red wall. Deputy leader Angela Rayner’s role as elections chief has also been questioned, with some saying she lacks experience of marginal battles. Others lay the blame for defeats at the door of former Darlington MP Jenny Chapman, Starmer’s campaign chief, though the leader is said to remain loyal to her.Ian Murray, who is helping Anas Sarwar to lead a resurgence in Scotland, and Chris Bryant, whose local party has ousted Plaid Cymru’s former leader Leanne Wood in the Rhondda in the Welsh assembly elections, are said to have strong cases for expanded attacking roles. Should Rachel Reeve’s potential elevation to shadow chancellor create a vacancy as shadow minister for the Cabinet Office, Starmer will need a strategic brain. He may choose one of his key allies, such as Steve Reed or Bridget Phillipson, to battle Michael Gove. Rayner may also be approached. It is a high-profile spot that entails building on the success Reeves has had scrutinising Johnson’s rule-breaking in the wake of the cash for curtains scandal and questions over PPE contracts. It is not clear whether Marsha de Cordova’s position as shadow equalities minister is safe, despite fears about the optics of removing a black, disabled woman from his top team.Others in line for promotion include Sarah Jones, who is currently shadow policing minister, and Chi Onwurah, who has long been tipped for shadow business secretary. It is unlikely, however, that Ed Miliband will relinquish his climate change responsibilities ahead of the COP 26 conference.Alison McGovern, shadow sports minister and Wirral MP, and Alex Norris may be asked to step up if Starmer’s reshuffle is wide-ranging. Related...Labour Councillor Filmed ‘Pilfering’ Tory Election Leaflet From LetterboxHere’s What’s At Stake In The ‘Super Thursday’ ElectionsUnite Urged to Stop Being Starmer's 'Backseat Driver' By Union Leadership Contender
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London’s Brent Cross shopping centre has been evacuated after a 21-year-old man was stabbed to death.The Metropolitan Police said a murder investigation has been launched following the fatal incident on Tuesday evening.Police were called to the north-west London shopping centre at around 6.45pm  following reports of a group of men fighting.Officers found a 21-year-old man who had been stabbed. Despite the efforts of the public, police and paramedics, he died at the scene.An 18-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. A second man, also believed to be aged 18, has been arrested on suspicion of affray. Police were called to Brent Cross Shopping Centre earlier this evening following reports of a fight. A 21-year-old man had been stabbed. Despite the efforts of the public, police and paramedics, he died at the scene. Two men have been arrested. https://t.co/MF88YpATAJ— Metropolitan Police (@metpoliceuk) May 4, 2021Chief superintendent Sara Leach, who is in charge of policing in north-west London, said: “My thoughts are with the loved ones of the young man who has been killed in this incident.“I would like to offer my thanks to the members of the public who came to his aid. They showed considerable courage.“Two people have been arrested and an investigation is already under way. We will do all we can to identify and bring to justice those responsible.“The public can expect to see a heightened police presence in the area through the rest of this evening and in the days to come.” This is a breaking news story and will be updated. Follow HuffPost UK on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
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A police cordon in place at Walker Avenue in Bolton where a 15-year-old boy was stabbed several times." src="https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/609187b5260000ef51b4231c.jpg?ops=scalefit_630_noupscale" />A 15-year-old boy has died after being stabbed several times in Bolton.The teenager, named locally as Reece Tansey, knocked on the door of a nearby house to ask for help after he was attacked in Walker Avenue shortly before 4.45am on Tuesday.Greater Manchester Police said he had suffered several stab wounds and was taken to hospital but died from his injuries.The force said a murder inquiry has been launched and no arrests have yet been made.A cordon is in place covering a large section of Walker Avenue in Great Lever, with a forensic tent in the front garden of one address.The victim was a pupil at Harper Green School in Farnworth.A teenage boy fatally stabbed in the early hours in Bolton has been named locallyhttps://t.co/rg0F21MxI8— The Bolton News (@TheBoltonNews) May 4, 2021In a message to parents on its website, the school said: “The school community is shocked and saddened by this terrible news and our thoughts are with the student’s family and friends at this difficult time.“For a life to be ended at such a young age is a total tragedy.“We will ensure any students who need it receive support and advice through our pastoral system.“Harper Green is a close-knit community, we will work together over the coming days and weeks in supporting all those affected.”Several hundred well-wishers later gathered at nearby Harper Green playing fields in pouring rain and released balloons in Reece’s memory.Appealing for information, detective superintendent Chris Bridge said: “This incident will understandably be a huge shock to the community and our thoughts are with the boy’s family at this awful time.“These are very early stages of our investigation but we would like to reassure the public that we are doing all we can to piece together what happened and find those responsible.“There will be an increased police presence in the area whilst we carry out a number of lines of inquiry and anyone concerned in the local neighbourhood can speak to our officers.“I would urge anyone who may have information or witnessed anything in the area to come forward.“Even the smallest information may be crucial to our investigation.”Anyone with information can call police on 101 quoting incident 359 of 04/05/2021 or report online at gmp.police.uk; or to remain anonymous contact Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.
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It’s only been a few days since Line Of Duty came to its divisive climax, but we’re all missing it already, right?For the last seven weeks, we’ve been consumed by the twists, the turns, the interrogations and the theorising, and now that it’s all over (for now anyway), there’s a massive AC-12 shaped hole in our lives. But we’re here to help with that – here’s 10 other crime dramas available to stream right now to fill the void...1. CriminalAvailable on: NetflixIf you can’t get enough of Line Of Duty’s interrogation scenes, then Criminal is the show for you. Each episode of the Netflix drama is set exclusively within the confines of a police interview suite, focusing on the intense mental conflict between detectives and the suspects they are investigating. Line Of Duty actors Rochenda Sandall (Lisa McQueen) and Lee Ingleby (Nick Huntley) are among the cast, with David Tennant, Katherine Kelly, Nicholas Pinnock and Kit Harington also starring. Each of the two series comprises different stories set in France, Spain, Germany and the UK, with each country getting their own episodes in their local language. 2. The MissingAvailable on: BBC iPlayerAs the title suggests, this BBC anthology series focuses on the search for children who have gone missing, with investigator Julien Baptiste committed to uncovering the truth in their disappearances. The first series, which aired in 2014, drew favourable comparisons to TV juggernaut Broadchurch, with a second run focusing on a new case arriving two years later. The show also spawned the spin-off series Baptiste in 2019, which delved more into the life of the beloved detective, played by Tchéky Karyo.  There are some familiar Line Of Duty faces involved too, as James Nesbitt (Marcus Thurwell) takes the lead in series one, with Keeley Hawes (DI Lindsay Denton) taking the central role in series two.3. UnforgottenAvailable on: Series 1-3 on Netflix, series 4 on ITV HubThis hit ITV drama has already aired four seasons to huge critical acclaim but received considerably less fanfare than Line Of Duty. However, many police officers claim Unforgotten is a more accurate depiction of the force than its BBC counterpart. If you’ve not managed to catch it yet, it stars Nicola Walker and Sanjeev Bhaskar as London detectives DCI Cassie Stuart and DI Sunny Khan, who solve cold cases of disappearance and murder. 4. Prime SuspectAvailable on: BritBoxSometimes you just can’t beat a classic, can you?Starring Dame Helen Mirren and penned by Lynda La Plante (who hasn’t exactly been complimentary about Line Of Duty in recent times), Prime Suspect is widely regarded as one of the best British police dramas of all time. Dame Helen plays the tough, chain-smoking detective Jane Tennison through seven series between 1991 and 2006, as her character is promoted from Detective Chief Inspector to Superintendent, facing off with criminals, while also encountering institutionalised sexism and bitter rivals inside the force.5. HinterlandAvailable on: NetflixSet in and filmed around rural Wales, Hinterland made history upon its debut as the first BBC television drama that had dialogue split between both English and Welsh.The show introduces DCI Tom Mathias, a detective with dark secrets, who finds himself in a small town that it soon emerges has a fair few secrets of its own.6. The FallAvailable on: NetflixThe casting of Gillian Anderson as DSU Stella Gibson and Jamie Dornan as the serial killer she’s trying to track down made The Fall a gripping watch when it debuted in 2015.After debuting on RTÉ One in the Republic of Ireland and BBC Two in the UK, The Fall went on to capture a more global audience when it arrived on Netflix internationally.7. MarcellaAvailable on: Series 1-2 on Netflix, series 3 on ITV HubThere was something about Marcella that set it apart from regular cop dramas when it arrived on ITV in 2016. Creator Hans Rosendeldt brought his “Nordic noir” magic to the UK after achieving international acclaim with The Bridge. With a haunting score and highly stylised visuals, the show centres on troubled detective Marcella Backland – played by Anna Friel – who is dealing with some dark secrets of her own as she investigates a 12-year-old case case of a serial killer. 8. LutherAvailable on: BBC iPlayerProbably not a show you want to watch late at night or by yourself, as it has a knack for making you feel unsafe in the most familiar of settings, but it is still one of the best cop dramas out there. Starring Idris Elba in the title role, John Luther is often consumed by the darkness of the cases that he investigates (and trust us, they are dark), and develops a dangerous relationship with psychopath and murderer Alice Morgan, played by Ruth Wilson. 9. The WireAvailable on: NOWWhile we’ve tried to keep this list limited to British dramas, it would be remiss of us not to include what is often hailed as the best police show of all time. To quote Line Of Duty’s DCS Patricia Carmichael, if for some inexplicable reason some of you don’t know of this show, each season of The Wire introduces a different institution of the city – like the illegal drug trade, city government and education – and explores its relationship to law enforcement. 10 ...or Line Of Duty Available on: BBC iPlayerAlternatively, if you really cannot let go of the AC-12 gang just yet, why not go back and revisit the first five series, and see whether certain things become more clear after the series six finale?HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices and availability subject to change.READ MORE:12 Shows To Watch The Line Of Duty Cast In Now The Series Is OverThe 7 Loose Ends The Line Of Duty Finale 'Definitely' Did Not Tie UpLove Anna Maxwell Martin In Line Of Duty? Then Motherland Is About To Be Your New Favourite ShowLine Of Duty's 'H' Actor Addresses Fans' 'Disappointment' Over Final Episode
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WARNING. This article contains spoilers of the highest order.  The hunt for “H” is finally over. Yes, after a four-year wait, we now know that DSU Ian Buckells was Line Of Duty’s mystery baddie all along. The bent copper, who had been helping to lead a clandestine network of corrupt police officers in league with organised crime, was unmasked during Sunday night’s blockbuster series finale.Many other long-running storylines also wrapped up during the episode, as Gail Vella’s killer was confirmed and Superintendent Ted Hastings revealed the true story behind Lee Banks, John Corbett and the £50k sum of money.If your head is still spinning trying to take all the information in, here’s a full recap... The first big development of the episode saw DI Steve Arnott finally attend a medical appointment where he revealed the truth about his reliance on painkillers, and was asked to surrender his firearms licence, before telling Hastings about what had been going on.  After this came the revelation that a lockbox had been found beneath the OCG’s gun workshop floor.Inside it was the workshopped pistol used to kill Gail Vella, as well as clothes and gloves belonging to the shooter, which DNA testing proved was Carl Banks. Also in the box were the knives that killed PC Maneet Bindra and undercover officer John Corbett, both of which had Ryan Pilkington’s prints on. The knife the OCG used to kill Jackie Laverty in series one was also recovered, with DCI Tony Gates’ prints on it – although we already knew the OCG planted his prints on the weapon so they could use it as leverage to coerce him into working with them. While questioning if there was any evidence that related to Marcus Thurwell or Ian Buckells, Arnott also mentioned Chief Constable Philip Osborne’s name, much to the shock of DS Chris Lomax…Back at AC-12, it was discovered that Marcus Thurwell was indeed dead – despite the fan theories – as the bodies of him and his wife were formally identified, having been strangled to death at their Spanish villa a number of weeks earlier. At the property, police found devices that had made contact with DCI Jo Davidson and OCG member Lisa McQueen. However, it turned out that the communication actually originated in the UK and was routed via Spain so that the IP would be a decoy, and Thurwell used as a stooge.Specialist Technician Amanda Yao then arrived with news of a recent message that had just been intercepted, with the sender saying Jo Davidson was “definately” high risk. The misspelling spiked AC-12’s suspicions as it matched the way “the fourth man” had spelled “definitely” when in contact with Lisa McQueen in series five. As a result, DC Chloe Bishop was asked to go through all the Operation Lighthouse and Lawrence Christopher files to see if there were any reports filed by officers that contained the same misspelling. As Hastings, Fleming and Arnott rushed to Blackthorn Prison to try and get Davidson to safety, they discovered a production order had been issued calling for Davidson to attend an interview at Hillside Lane station, which had supposedly been co-signed by DS Chris Lomax and DI Fleming. Realising it had been forged, they rushed to find the convoy Davidson had been taken on with corrupt prison officers. After managing to intercept it, Arnott and Fleming planted themselves in the van, and continued with the route, where they were ambushed by OCG who were ready to kill Davidson. However, the balaclava-clad men were quickly apprehended and the corrupt prison officers arrested.  With Davidson having been taken to safety, she was interviewed by Fleming and Arnott who offered her witness protection if she were to give up the “fourth man”. Davidson then said former OCG boss Tommy Hunter (who was both her uncle and her father) had told her that her father was a bent police officer, who she was made to fear and take orders from. This man was revealed to be former officer and known peadophile Patrick Fairbank, who is serving time for his involvement in the Sands View Boys Home scandal. However, after a search of his prison cell found nothing, it became clear that Hunter had manipulated Davidson into thinking Fairbank was also the fourth man as well as her father, which he was not. Back at AC-12, Bishop’s review of misspellings the Vella and Christopher files has revealed their real identity, much to the shock of Hastings, Fleming and Arnott. As Hastings went to tell DCS Patricia Carmichael of their breakthrough, Fleming and Arnott warned him against widely publicising their findings, as their own professional conduct would come under scrutiny. It was at this point the pair revealed they knew about Hastings blowing Corbett’s cover and subsequently paying his widow money. Confessing his involvement in the events leading up to Corbett’s death, Hastings maintained that he did not disclose Corbett’s identity to Lee Banks during his visit to Blackthorn Prison in series five, instead telling him that there “was an informant in the OCG” and “no more than that”. This was consistent with Banks’ account that he gave to Arnott. Hastings claimed he wanted to send a warning to Corbett, so that when he found out the OCG knew about a rat he would go to ground. Admitting he knew there was risk to Corbett’s life, Hastings added that he believed Corbett “had to coming to him in spades” as he’d been involved in the death of four officers – including PC Bindra – and had also violently attacked his wife. Hastings said that what he didn’t know at this point was that he was the son of woman he “cared deeply about many years ago” – this woman being Anne Marie McGillis, a CHIS who Hastings got close to when he worked in the Royal Ulster Constabulary. He called his actions “his biggest regret”.As for the money, Hastings said he was originally tricked into accepting it (by corrupt former officer Mark Moffatt who was part of the conspiracy to set Hastings up as “H” with Gill Biggeloe in series five), and was blocked from returning it, but it was found before he could hand it in as evidence. He explained he split the £100k into two halves as he realised it was a bribe that could turn nasty, intending to use it as insurance against the OCG if they came looking.With one half of the £50k never found, he then gifted this to Steph Corbett following John’s death by way of atonement, although she remains in the dark about the real version of events that led to her husband’s death. During this conversation, Hastings also revealed Steph had told him about Arnott’s painkiller addiction and that he’d seen to it that Arnott didn’t face disciplinary action.Finally, in what was possibly the longest, most tense reveal in Line Of Duty, the fourth man was finally unmasked. After walking through AC-12 HQ and sitting down at the desk, the camera panned up to reveal DSU Ian Buckells sitting opposite Hastings, Fleming and Arnott. He faced intense questioning about his double life, but various pieces of evidence were produced to confirm he was the final officer leading the clandestine network of corrupt officers in collusion with organised crime. Buckells had proved to be grossly incompetent at his job over the years, but it was this that meant his corruption was never spotted – in fact, he was so convincing that Davidson was even trying to frame him, whilst not realising he was the one actually in charge. “Yeah right, I’m a blundering fool? I’m the one who’s made total mugs out of you lot,” he told AC-12. Buckells then tried to go for immunity by agreeing to co-operate, quoting Osborne and saying that “institutionalised corruption doesn’t officially exist” in Central Police and therefore AC-12 wouldn’t be able to make the charges stick. He revealed that prior to his death, Hunter was always the top man of the OCG, but it then split into disparate groups, with Thurwell and Fairbank initially overseeing control of the network of bent officers, before DI Matthew “Dot” Cotton and ACC Derek Hilton became the top dogs.After their deaths, Buckells was the only one left still serving in the police. He claimed to just take orders from the OCGs, and they kept asking him to sort bigger and bigger affairs, like the Eastfield depot raid in series five. AC-12 put it to him that the OCG didn’t actually order Vella’s murder as they had no real reason to. The only connection they had to her on their side was through Hunter – who is long dead – and his son Darren (who was one of the gang who attacked Lawrence Christopher), who Fleming noted was a “nobody” to the OCG. However, two police officers now involved in the original Christopher investigation were now high-ranking – Buckells and Osborne – meaning they had the most motive to want her dead, as she was beginning to establish links that proved institutionalised corruption in the force.  Buckells was then asked if he colluded with Osborne to have Vella killed, and while he didn’t reply, he was screwed either way – if he declined to help with the investigation, he would be ineligible for witness protection, and by confessing conspiracy to murder, he would then be ineligible for immunity from prosecution. Having wrapped by far their biggest case ever, Fleming and Arnott headed to the pub to celebrate, where Fleming revealed she would accept Hastings’ offer of a job back with AC-12 should he remain as the gaffer. Arnott opened up to his “mate” about his painkiller addiction and revealed he wanted to keep seeing Steph Corbett romantically, but felt torn.Fleming was then seen visiting the department’s medical officer for an unspecified reason. Back at AC-12, Arnott and Fleming revealed to DCS Patricia Carmichael that they were now intending to go after Darren Hunter for his part in Lawrence Christopher’s death in order to get a conviction.Arnott suggested launching an investigation into whether other members of Marcus Thurwell’s team might have been involved in the cover-up of the Lawrence Christopher case, given many of them are still serving officers. Carmichael informed him that such cases “aren’t a priority”. Like Osborne, she refused to entertain the idea there is a problem of institutionalised corruption in the force – something the Chief Constable reiterated in a press conference about finding Gail Vella’s killer, much to Hastings’ disgust. Hastings revealed he would be appealing the decision to push him into early retirement, but as he went to leave the building, he returned to Carmichael’s office and confessed his role in Corbett’s death. “What do you expect me to do with that information?” she asked. “That’s entirely up to you, ma’am,” he replied. “But whatever you do, you do because you care about truth and accountability. You do it because you carry the fire.”A pre-credits sequence then revealed all proceedings against Terry Boyle in Gail Vella’s murder had been dropped and he had been rehoused, while Jo Davidson was granted witness protection and was living with a new parter in an undisclosed location. Darren Hunter was also discovered to be under investigation for Christopher’s murder, while PS Farida Jatri was freed from prison and returned to the police force.  Plans to slimline anti-corruption were also ploughing ahead, with DCS Carmichael remaining in charge of AC-12.“Close colleagues” of the Chief Constable had been appointed to other senior positions in anti-corruption, with AC-12’s powers to curb wrongdoing in public office never weaker, which suggests he is suppressing information.Meanwhile, Central Police submitted an application for public-interest immunity in legal proceedings against Buckells, which means that if it is successful, no evidence about institutionalised corruption would be heard in court. This suggests they don’t want him to face justice as it could expose something much larger...With the photos of Jo Davidson, John Corbett, Roz Huntley, Danny Waldron, Lindsay Denton and Tony Gates packed up into a box at the end of the episode, things looked pretty final for AC-12, leading to questions about whether there will be another series of Line Of Duty.However, there were a lot of loose ends – specifically around Carmichael, Osborne and even Lomax – and the suggestion that there’s a lot more to the Lawrence Christopher case yet to be discovered. All six series of Line Of Duty are available to stream on BBC iPlayer.READ MORE:The 7 Loose Ends The Line Of Duty Finale 'Definitely' Did Not Tie UpWho Is DSU Ian Buckells? The Line Of Duty Character You Need To Know About After Episode 3Martin Compston Hints Line Of Duty Might Not Return After Current Series Finale
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Questions have been raised over the accountability of the Metropolitan Police after it emerged the force was facing 63 active investigations from the independent watchdog – with some going back years.The figure was provided by the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) after a request from HuffPost UK following a series of complaints about the UK’s largest police force in recent months.Our data request initially revealed one investigation still ongoing that was first opened in March 2015, and four cases still active for each of 2018/19 and 2019/20. One of these, involving an officer who hit a vulnerable teenager 34 times with a baton and sprayed her up close with CS gas, was finally concluded on Friday as we published this story.The watchdog, set up out the ashes of the Independent Police Complaints Commission in 2018 to ensure “greater accountability to public”, has an annual budget of around £73m and last year received around 4,300 referrals nationally. Forces must refer the worst incidents to the IOPC – such as if someone dies or is seriously injured following police action – and if they receive a complaint it considers legitimate. The IPOC can also “call in” smaller investigations being carried out by forces into themselves, if they consider incidents to be serious enough.But there are warnings “the system is broken” as the IOPC’s probes into the Met have come into sharp focus this year.In March, the watchdog announced it was launching two separate investigations relating to Sarah Everard, whose death put a global spotlight onto violence against women and girls. One is examining how Wayne Couzens, the serving officer charged with Everard’s murder, came to sustain serious injuries while in custody. The other investigation is examining an “inappropriate” graphic that was allegedly shared by an officer who took part in search operations.Police detain Patsy Stevenson as people gather at a memorial site in Clapham Common Bandstand following the murder of Sarah Everard." src="https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/6089d20d260000413eb41d1d.jpg?ops=scalefit_630_noupscale" />In the last week, the IOPC’s investigations of the Met led to two more developments.On Monday, it announced the Met would face scrutiny over how it handled the disappearance of 19-year-old Richard Okorogheye, whose body was found in Epping Forest, Essex, in April. The watchdog is investigating whether racism played a part in the search following complaints from Okorogheye’s mother, Evidence Joel.“Maybe it’s the culture, my language barrier,” Joel told Channel 4 News, adding that she believed officers considered her to be “one of those African women who was being frantic” and did not immediate take action to find her son.On Wednesday, the Crown Prosecution Service announced two police officers had been charged with misconduct following an IOPC investigation into the circulation of inappropriate photographs of sisters Nicole Smallman, 27, and Bibaa Henry, 46, who had been stabbed to death in a north London park. The watchdog carried out a criminal investigation into allegations that the officers, Pc Deniz Jaffer, 47, and Pc Jamie Lewis, 32, took “non-official and inappropriate photographs” of the crime scene before sharing them on WhatsApp.Bibaa Henry (left) and Nicole Smallman, who were stabbed to death at Fryent Country Park in Wembley in the early hours of June 6." src="https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5fbf9a602900008bb1c6ca5f.jpeg?ops=scalefit_630_noupscale" />But the investigations go back a number of years.The longest-running, HuffPost UK understands, relates to the death of Black teenager Stephen Lawrence. In 2015, the Independent Police Complaints Commission announced former Scotland Yard commissioner Lord Stevens would be investigated into claims that documents were not passed to the 1998 Stephen Lawrence public inquiry led by Sir William Macpherson.A referral followed a complaint to the force on behalf of Neville Lawrence, Stephen’s father, that there was a “failure of top rank or very senior officers, including but not limited to the deputy commissioner Sir John Stevens, to provide full, frank and truthful information to the Macpherson Inquiry on the issue of corruption”.It focused on two letters sent by Lord Stevens, but was halted while four former Met officers were investigated over their work on the initial murder investigation. The CPS is still to decide if the four are to be charged, six years after the complaint was opened.Another still ongoing investigation began following British sprinter Bianca Williams accusing the Met of “racial profiling” after she and her partner were stopped and searched by officers in west London in July last year. The European and Commonwealth gold medallist and Ricardo dos Santos, 25, the Portuguese record holder over 400m, were stopped and handcuffed while with their three-month-old baby in Maida Vale.Video footage shared widely on social media showed the pair – who are both Black – being aggressively pulled out of a car by officers. The distressed athlete is heard repeatedly saying: “My son is in the car.”Racist police aren't just in America #BLMpic.twitter.com/7DKgLnGPhc— Linford Christie (@ChristieLinford) July 4, 2020Met Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick later apologised and launched a review into the use of handcuffs pre-arrest after the vehicle stop.Last year, the watchdog said it made 11 recommendations for the Met to improve its use of stop and search powers after a review of cases found the “legitimacy of stop and searches was being undermined” by a number of issues, including a lack of understanding about the impact of disproportionality and poor communication.In one investigation, a Black man in possession of someone else’s credit card was suspected of having stolen it even after providing a credible explanation. In another case, officers used stop and search powers after brothers Liam and Dijon Joseph, who are Black, fist-bumped, claiming they believed they had been exchanging drugs.The family of Richard Okorogheye have questioned the force's handling of the investigation into his disappearance." src="https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/6086e68b1e00009a41100375.jpg?cache=jxHCznAWNW&ops=scalefit_630_noupscale" />Not all the outstanding cases are so well-known. On Friday, a probe that had only appeared to prompt two write-ups in local media based on an IOPC press release saw a police officer dismissed for hitting a vulnerable teenager 34 times with a baton.The Met said Pc Benjamin Kemp used force that was “utterly inappropriate” on a 17-year-old girl, who was on escorted leave from a mental health unit and had become separated from a group in Newham, east London, in May 2019. CS spray and handcuffs were used on the girl, as well as the baton strikes. Kemp was sacked following a misconduct panel that came after complaints were made by an NHS trust staff member and the girl’s mother.The number of cases has raised concern among politicians. Jenny Jones, a Green party peer and ex-member of the London Police Authority, revealed in 2014 she had been recorded on a database of “domestic extremists” by the Met Police and that officers had been tracking her political movements since 2001.Asked about our findings, she told HuffPost UK: “It is extremely difficult for people to hold the Met Police accountable for their wrongdoing. My own personal experience of being spied on by the Met Police and taking complaints to the IOPC confirms that the system is broken.“The IOPC is massively underfunded and under-resourced. It took them nearly three years to investigate a complaint I brought against multiple police officers, and if I hadn’t been assisted by an excellent legal team then it probably would have taken even longer.“The IOPC is so heavily reliant on gathering witness statements from police officers that unless there is some massively compelling external evidence, it is very hard for the IOPC to actually uphold any complaints.“Unless people obtain justice for legitimate complaints against the police then not only will we have a second rate and potentially corrupt police service with officers regarding themselves as above the law, we will also have a groundswell of public opinion that is alienated from the police and mistrustful of them.”Former police officer Lord Brian Paddick, the Liberal Democrat spokesperson on home affairs in House of Lords, said: “Liberal Democrats have had concerns for some time about what is happening in the Metropolitan Police, particularly around culture and diversity.“Persistent disproportionate focus of stop and search on Black Londoners, particularly when section 60 [a temporary power that lowers the bar for police to be allowed to search people] authorises searches without suspicion, together with a disproportionate focus of internal misconduct on ethnic minority officers and staff, raise serious questions about the culture inside the Met.“The police must foster trust and confidence with all communities if they are to be effective in tackling crime, particularly knife crime.”An IOPC spokesperson said: “We investigate the most serious and sensitive incidents and allegations involving the police in England and Wales. Most complaints about the police are dealt with by the relevant police force.”HuffPost UK has approached the Met for comment.Related...Two Officers Charged Over 'Inappropriate Photos' Of Sisters Killed In ParkDid Racism Hamper Search For Richard Okorogheye?
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Do you know that stress could affect the chances of IVF success?Are you undergoing an IVF procedure?Then you need to know that stress is one of the factors that could determine chances of success in your IVF procedure.People are used to living conditions with hectic schedules and career challenges, always running towards an unknown target, ignoring the resultant stress that develops without their knowledge.Stress is not dangerous but might alter the body's response to the treatment, especially when undergoing infertility treatment.Here are a few tips to reduce stress when undergoing an IVF procedure• Trust your doctor and simply follow his / her advice.Talk to the doctor and find out.Do not fret over it and create unwanted complexities in your head.• Avoid watching mega serials, soap operas, family melodrama TV serials, horror movies, murder mysteries etc.Confirm with your doctor as to what exercises are safe to give the best results.• Eat freshly cooked healthy food containing fruits and vegetables.• Keep an eye on your BMI ..it could affect your fertility status.• We know that you can't wait to know the good news, but there's a specific time during the IVF procedure which is advised by your doctor to take your pregnancy test.
It is striking how many different tales the poet Benjamin Zephaniah can tell about being stopped by police.Recounted in the deft storytelling voice that has won him a remarkable literary career, the famous writer goes over a succession of incidents ranging from the bizarre to the brutally cruel.He is speaking to HuffPost UK as the conviction of Derek Chauvin for murdering George Floyd in the United States places renewed focus on the death of his own cousin, Mikey Powell killed in similar circumstances 18 years ago.Yesterday, in a special report, we spoke to the families of four British men who died in police custody between 1998 and 2010.Zephaniah, 63, and his brother Tippa Naphtali, 59, have been campaigning over the issue for decades, and Tippa set up a memorial fund in Mikey’s name to help other families in 2015.Tragically, the dub poet says, he was not surprised when a death happened within his family – because of his own encounters with police as a young man.“I just knew the way our communities were being policed and I knew that you could die, basically, because I’d known other families who it happened to,” he says.He remembers being pulled into a shop doorway and beaten by police when he was only 15 or 16 in Selly Oak, which he describes as “kind of a slightly posh Birmingham”.“I remember this police car just stopped at the side of me, they were marked, they were uniformed, they just got out, put me in a shop doorway and just beat me, jumped in the car and just drove off,” he says. “I didn’t understand what my rights were. I didn’t understand Citizens Advice Bureaux or anything like that, I just thought: ‘Well, that’s what the police do to us.’”On another occasion, in Stoke Newington, north London, in the 1980s, Zephaniah witnessed a woman being kidnapped and dragged into a car at knifepoint. He went into the nearby police station to report the crime but says police instead accused him of being the perpetrator of a burglary. “So they said, come around the back, and as soon as I walked around the back they dragged me and said: ‘You’re under arrest,’” he says. Zephaniah said he wanted to speak to his solicitor, giving the name and number of the renowned human rights barrister Michael Mansfield, who is a friend. “And they just looked at me – ‘Michael Mansfield, is this the Michael Mansfield?’ – and I went: ‘Yeah.’“And they wouldn’t think that a Rasta walking down Stoke Newington High Street knows Michael Mansfield, right?” says Zephaniah. “So when they saw that, I was free within like 10 minutes. If it wasn’t, that would be me probably framed up.”Two more recent experiences of being stopped by police in rural Lincolnshire, where he now lives, are described by Zephaniah as “kind of slightly sad but slightly hilarious”.In an incident he compares to what is bleakly known as “driving while Black”, the poet says he was pulled over while running.“I got stopped jogging once, and I think that was hilarious,” he says. “It was raining and the cop said: ‘Where are you coming from,’ and I said: ‘Well, home.’ “He said: ‘Where are you going to,’ and I went: ‘Well, home, I’m jogging around in circles.’ “He went: ‘Can I search you? Have you got any keys?’ and I actually said to him: ‘Have you just joined the force? Do you need to, kind of, prove something, you know?’ I just laughed and laughed at him.”On another occasion he was stopped in a local park while babysitting the white child of friends. There was a stand-off with police officers asking if the girl was his daughter.“I’ve got white friends who adopted a Black child and I said: ‘Have you ever been stopped for having a Black child?’ and he went: ‘No, absolutely not,’” he says. “It’s just a weird one being stopped for having a white kid.”But Zephaniah says he has to be cautious in what he says, or in making light of these stops, because of the treatment and racial profiling of younger Black people.“I do think I’ve always got to be careful about this because you see those situations of being stopped,” he says.For example, he says, “the young guys coming out of a pub or club or something like that and they’ve got no bus fare so they have to walk home – and there’s three or four of them and they’re walking home.”But the way police see it, he adds, “especially when it comes to Black youths, if there are more than three of you it’s a gang.“That’s how the police see it. It’s not like a group of friends as it would be with a white group. It’s a gang. And so their experience, the young people’s experiences, is so much different to mine.”Zephaniah also believes racism played a part in his cousin’s death.Mikey Powell died after being detained by West Midlands Police during a mental health crisis on September 7, 2003.“There’s a time I talk about in [my autobiography] where I’m at Thornhill Road police station, which is where Mikey died, actually,” he says.“And I’m in there and the police have given me a bit of a beating and then they take me into a room and on the wall of the room – it’s almost as if there are scalps – there are dreadlocks pinned on the wall of the room or hats. “And the police officer is telling me that this hat belonged to Errol, this hat belonged to Leroy, this hat belonged to Winston, this dreadlock I pulled it off this guy’s head. “It was just like a wall of scalps, trophies almost, and the police were bragging that they’d pulled out locks from these people and that if I don’t confess to something mine will be up there too. “Have you seen the TV programme Life On Mars? It was kind of like that.”In another incident, Zephaniah says police officers stamped on his toes in a corridor of Digbeth Police Station after a beating. “I mean, they had fun with us, you know. They knew we had nowhere to go,” he says.Zephaniah says his family tried to pursue justice for his cousin Mikey through the official legal channels.But he alleges police told him that if he spoke out he could end up prejudicing any legal case and made it clear that they would “come down” on him if he did.“So it was really weird, because in other cases of deaths in custody I was really active, but with Mikey I had to be really careful,” he says. “They were kind of waiting for me to put a word out for place. So, for that reason, I kind of stepped back.”But over his long career he has continually campaigned, written and spoken frankly about institutional racism in the police and wider structural racism in society.“My Stephen Lawrence poem, there’s a line in there where I say: ‘Why are we paying for a police force that will not work for us?’” says Zephaniah. “I mean, sometimes I think if I could take away the bit of my taxes that pays for the police, because they’re useless for me.”But the UK Black Lives Matter protests following George Floyd’s murder by white police officer Derek Chauvin in the US did give him hope.“I’ve seen these surges before and it goes away,” he says. “I really think the difference this time is that the Black Lives Matter movement is not just peopled by Black people. I think that’s one of the greatest things about this time.“I think there is something about the George Floyd video. You couldn’t watch that if you’re a mother or a parent or a student and go: ‘Well, it’s not that bad.’“And some of the young people I’ve seen just coming up and saying: ‘Not in my name.’ I’ve seen some of the banners people are carrying, they’re quite funny, but quite telling. “There’s one banner that says ‘Black Lives Matter’, and then it says something like: ‘Come on dad – don’t you get it?’“It’s young people who have got racist parents saying: ‘Come on – wake up.’ And that’s what it needs.” He wants to see a “cultural mindset change”.“I kind of have more faith in those at grassroots level, the students I work with, grassroots organisations,” he says.“What depresses me a little bit is government and they’re kind of hardened. Just thinking about the statues and stuff like that, and you’ve got people like [Boris] Johnson saying: ‘No, absolutely not, we’re not going to look at the history books, we’re not going to do anything.’“Well, they really need looking at. You know, because some of them are telling lies, some of them are telling half-truths and some of them are just not telling you the other half the story.”On the topic of policing reform, he says: “Let’s just say the amount of Black officers is completely representative of the amount of Black people in the country – that wouldn’t impress me because I want to know that the culture of policing has changed. So it’s not just one thing.”While he no longer feels an active threat from police, Zephaniah says he remains acutely aware that he may be at increased risk, like his cousin Mikey Powell, because of his race.“Well, when I walk or drive in the street, every time I pass a police officer there is a little thing that goes off inside me,” he says. “I don’t see them as a threat to me personally. But I know it’s not impossible that I could get harmed.”END KICKER: For more information on how you can support the National Mikey Powell Memorial Family Fund, please visit its official website or donate here. Readers can also donate to the Justice for the Family of Christopher Alder crowdfunding campaign. Visit the United Families & Friends Campaign which supports those affected by deaths in custodyRelated...Exclusive: The Met Police Are More Likely To Publish Your Mugshot If You're Black7 Things That Contradict The Claim Britain Is ‘Not Institutionally Racist’Labour MP Dawn Butler Accuses Met Police Of Racial Profiling After Being Stopped By OfficersWhat Brits Need To Know About The Derek Chauvin Murder Trial
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Great moral ideals, including fact, liberty, loyalty, decency, justice, courtesy, reverence, virtues, perseverance, humility, knowledge of one's duty, love, sympathy, etc.The tendency towards adults, young people, and children in our culture is growing with acts and actions denoting immorality like harassment, sexual assault, theft, substance addiction, school shooting, gang lynching, murder, etc.During the Indian Educational System, many problems and evils caused by deteriorating ethical standards were followed by numerous changes such as fast modernization, industrialization, urbanization, imperialism, overly materialistic lifestyles, and the influences of Western culture.The less law and morals are achieved, the more divided is civilization.Increasingly, labor specialization, racial diversity within society, and the declining and decreasing presence of religious values are factors influencing divisions between law and morality.If morality is not learned, our kids will decide on the basis of their immediate needs and desires, not through good judgment, and even if it is not right.
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The DOJ had this plan in place in case Chauvin was found not guilty of murder in George Floyd's death, per the Star Tribune. This case is ongoing.
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At the beginning of 2021, Netflix announced plans to release a new original film every week for the rest of the year.In the four months since then, the streaming service has gifted us family fun with Yes Day, the star-studded superhero parody Thunder Force, domestic drama Malcolm & Marie and Amy Poehler’s coming-of-age comedy Moxie.There has also been acclaimed films like Pieces Of A Woman, The White Tiger and News Of The World, which were all nominated for awards at this year’s Oscars.Netflix has now announced its slate for May, which includes a zombie-fied action thriller, a documentary about a sporting legend and the long-awaited arrival of The Woman In The Window, two years after the film’s trailer first debuted.Here are all the new Netflix films to enjoy in May...Monster (7 May)Netflix says: Monster tells the story of Steve Harmon (Kelvin Harrison, Jr.) a seventeen-year-old honour student whose world comes crashing down around him when he is charged with felony murder.The film follows his dramatic journey from a smart, likeable film student from Harlem attending an elite high school through a complex legal battle that could leave him spending the rest of his life in prison. Oxygen (12 May)Netflix says: The film tells the story of a young woman, who wakes up in a cryogenic pod. She doesn’t remember who she is or how she ended up there.As she’s running out of oxygen, she must rebuild her memory to find a way out of her nightmare.The Woman In The Window (14 May)Netflix says: Confined by her agoraphobia, Anna Fox finds herself keeping tabs on the new family across the street through the windows of her NYC home. After witnessing a brutal crime, secrets begin to unravel and nothing and no one are what they seem.Army Of The Dead (21 May)Netflix says: Following a zombie outbreak in Las Vegas, a group of mercenaries take the ultimate gamble, venturing into the quarantine zone to pull off the greatest heist ever attempted.Ghost Lab (26 May)Netflix says: A research experiment about the afterlife goes awry, when Gla and Wee, two medical doctor buddies see a ‘ghost’ with their own eyes for the first time. The encounter spawns an insatiable binge to find a scientific explanation for ghostly spirits, and to find proof of an afterlife.Their fixation and reckless pursuit of knowledge will take them down a rabbit hole that will cost them their friendship, and their loved ones. Baggio: The Divine Ponytail (26 May) Netflix says: The story of Robert Baggio, one of the best soccer players of all time, including his career highs, triumphs over injuries and discovery of Buddhism.Blue Miracle (27 May)Netflix says: The incredible true story of Casa Hogar, the Mexican boys home that entered the world’s biggest fishing tournament to save their orphanage.READ MORE:Here's Where You Can Stream This Year's Oscar-Nominated FilmsBridgerton Fans Have Two Huge Reasons To Celebrate After Netflix's Latest AnnouncementPrince Harry And Meghan Markle's First Netflix Series Has Been Announced
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In his first joint address to Congress, US President Joe Biden called for the nation to “root out systemic racism” and enact police reforms in the name of George Floyd. From the floor of the House on Wednesday night, Biden recalled the words of Floyd’s daughter Gianna, who told him last year before her father’s funeral, “my Daddy changed the world.”“After the conviction of George Floyd’s murderer, we can see how right she was — if — if we have the courage to act,” the president said. “We have all seen the knee of injustice on the neck of Black America. Now is our opportunity to make some real progress.”Last week, a jury found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all charges in Floyd’s killing. Chauvin murdered Floyd last year, kneeling on his neck for nine minutes as Floyd repeatedly said he couldn’t breathe. Biden called the verdict a “step forward” when it was announced, saying of Floyd’s killing: “It was a murder in full light of day, and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see systemic racism.”In his speech to Congress Wednesday, Biden asked Americans to “come together” and “root out systemic racism in our criminal justice system.” The president pushed for Congress to pass police reform, specifically the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which the Democratic-led House passed earlier this year. The legislation would ban police chokeholds and no-knock warrants, require data collection on police encounters and end qualified immunity. Biden urged senators to “work together to find a consensus” and pass the legislation by the anniversary of Floyd’s death, next month on May 25. latest newsBoris Johnson Shows Why You Wouldn’t Like Him When He’s AngryMatt Hancock Totally Refuses To Answer Questions On Boris Johnson’s FlatBoris Johnson Facing New Rules To Force Him To Correct 'Lies' To Parliament
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