Image: PixabayAn 18-month review into antimicrobial resistance warns that superbugs will kill upwards of 10 million people a year by 2050, a frightening prospect that s being described as the antibiotic apocalypse.The golden age of antibiotics which the world has taken for granted for well over fifty years has ended.Indeed, infections that used to be easily treated, such as tuberculosis and gonorrhea, have reemerged a serious health threat.Individuals receiving organ transplants would have to rely on their own immune systems to prevent their bodies from rejecting donor organs.O Neill said this issue can no longer be ignored by politicians and the finance sector.He s hoping that leaders of the world will make it a top priority at the upcoming G20 meeting to be held in China this September.
Photo: BSIP/Universal Images Group/Getty ImagesA company has been created to develop "novel technology" to help treat type 1 diabetes and potentially negate the need for insulin injections.Islexa, formed after successful pre-clinical studies, will now concentrate on more pre-clinical development, the hope being that trials can take place "in the next few years."Insulin regulates levels of glucose in our blood.Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas produces no insulin, while type 2 diabetes refers to when not enough insulin is produced, or when our body's cells "don't react to insulin.""This is a really exciting technology that has the potential to bring life-changing benefits to these patients," Keith Thompson, CEO of the CGT and Islexa director, said."The collaboration has already delivered promising results and the formation of Islexa will accelerate the development of these lab grown islets and ultimately get this potential treatment to thousands of patients," he went on to add.
Doing it in our studio seemed right, especially when you find that alchemy and togetherness while you re making a record.Digital Trends: There s a definite lo-fi minimalist feel to Delusions, but this is a headphones record to me because there are so many textures going on in every song.I m pretty limited.I ve got about four fingers, but they do the trick.With it, I did a close mic and a room mic for the acoustic guitar, and then I did a few vocals through a Shure SM57, one track of the Wurlitzer, and then one track of an organ.I know I can sit there with my children and go, OK, guys, today is Beatles day, and you re gonna learn.
Therefore, I have collected a number of points that I feel are recurring when I get mixes sent to me. It does not matter if your mix is ​​perfectly clean balance sheet terms unless it affects the listener. Often you can get a completely different sound by just moving your microphone a few centimeters when recording. These are important questions to ask yourself, not only in terms of compression. Other tricks is that during the recording angle your microphone slight angle up or down, so you do not sing right into the membrane, to thereby reduce air pressure when you're singing. If instead you add one of the guitars in the middle and pull the organ to the left so suddenly, it's a major difference between the channels and the song is perceived as wider.
A group of researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have managed to cut out HIV-1 genes from mice and rat genomes.In a proof-of-concept study, we show that our gene editing technology can be effectively delivered to many organs of two small animal models and excise large fragments of viral DNA from the host cell genome, said Professor Kamel Khalili, who led the study.This, scientists hope, could one day lead to the elimination of the deadly virus in human patients as well.This would potentially excise the viral DNA fragment from the genome altogether.After two weeks, the Temple University team examined their subjects DNA, and found that the HIV DNA was no longer present, seemingly removed from every tissue, including the brain, heart, kidney, liver, lungs, spleen, and blood cells.The next step for Khalili s team will be to conduct a larger study on animals, but the team hopes that a clinical trial for human patients could come to fruition within the next several years.
In one of the studies, certain types of antibiotics appeared to spur an inflammatory condition in humans that can sabotage life-saving transplants.Two drug combinations in particular—a regimen of piperacillin and tazobactam as well as a combo of imipenem and cilastatin—linked with patients having a higher risk of developing graft-versus-host disease GVHD , a life-threatening inflammatory condition in which the transplanted cells treat the recipient s body as a foreign enemy and mount an attack.Those antibiotic combinations are considered broad spectrum, meaning they can massacre many different types of microbes, particularly helpful anaerobic microbes.While the authors don t prove causation and would need to back up the results in further trials, they note that their results suggest that selecting antibiotics with a more limited spectrum of activity especially against anaerobes could prevent microbiota injury and thus reduce GVHD in the colon and GVHD-associated mortality.In the hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory, there was a slow down in brain cell production in drugged mice compared to controls.The findings, while only in mice and await validation in further trials, suggest so far that antibiotics may take a significant toll on the brain.
Health data collected by wearable devices is a "big distraction" to doctors and clinicians, according to big data billionaire Mike Lynch, who says he has been working with the UK government on the issue of wearable health.Lynch, the scientific entrepreneur behind Autonomy, a big data company that was sold to HP for £7.4 billion in 2011, questioned what GPs are supposed to do when patients present them with data they have collected on their own wearable devices.Devices like the Apple Watch and the Fitbit can now track a person's heart rate and sleeping patterns while more niche wearables can monitor vital organ signs and perspiration levels."What the hell is a GP supposed to do with that data ?"Wearable devices will often give false alarms and the infrastructure isn't there for healthcare professionals to deal with the data they produce, Lynch added.Clinicians are being presented with increasing amounts of data, said Lynch, adding that the problem is "only going to get worse with this consumer empowerment."It s Silicon Valley VC money going into this kind of crazy over-instrumentation."Although Lynch is skeptical about using wearable data in healthcare, he is in favour of improving the way in which healthcare professionals utilise data in general.As a result, he's invested $13.75 million in a healthcare startup called Sophia Genetics, which has built a platform that analyses genomic data to help clinicians diagnose and treat diseases like cancer.Business Insider met with Lynch and Sophia Genetics cofounder and CEO Jurgi Camblong this week to find out where they see healthcare going in the future.A more indepth article from this encounter will be posted on Business Insider in due course.
The importance of the service means that any IT decisions about how it is run must be carefully thought through.CBR spoke to Ian Trenholm, CEO, NHSBT, and Anthony Evans, digital service manager, NHSBT, about the technology it is using.Before a move to Microsoft Azure almost two years ago, NHSBT had been using its own in-house service to manage all of its systems, but while they were stable, they struggled to deal with spikes in demand and were un-flexible."So if a celebrity goes on breakfast news and says, 'I'm very grateful for a blood transfusion', then people immediately try and go online and book a blood donation appointment.This month two NHS trusts were fined £365,000 for leaking information about thousands of NHS staff and hundreds of patients with HIV.NHSBT has architected its systems so that its on-premise estate manages some of the data that is very sensitive, but it has a secure high speed link between its internal database and the digital service that users see.
It sounds otherworldly, but the music produced by Danish ensemble Between Music was actually produced right here on this Earth.AquaSonic is the name of the performance and it features the five performers playing custom-made instruments and singing entirely submerged in water tanks.The production s website states that years of research went into the performance in order to create the optimal instruments and techniques.The artists conducted countless experiments in collaboration with deep-sea divers, instrument makers and scientists to develop entirely new, highly specialized subaqueous instruments.These include an underwater organ or hydraulophone, crystallophone, rotacorda, percussion and violin.Between Music just wrapped up a sold-out, three-day premiere at the Operadagen Festival in the Netherlands, but according to its Facebook page, the ensemble is exploring the possibility of an international tour.
It sounds otherworldly, but the music produced by Danish ensemble Between Music was actually produced right here on this Earth.AquaSonic is the name of the performance and it features the five performers playing custom-made instruments and singing entirely submerged in water tanks.The production s website states that years of research went into the performance in order to create the optimal instruments and techniques.The artists conducted countless experiments in collaboration with deep-sea divers, instrument makers and scientists to develop entirely new, highly specialised subaqueous instruments.These include an underwater organ or hydraulophone, crystallophone, rotacorda, percussion and violin.Between Music just wrapped up a sold-out, three-day premiere at the Operadagen Festival in the Netherlands, but according to its Facebook page, the ensemble is exploring the possibility of an international tour.
It s time to get up in the guts of one of the candidates for President of the United States.Developer Bossa Studios has launched a new update for its Surgeon Simulator game in a $3 Anniversary Expansion that has players operating on presumptive Republican Party nominee and three time runner-up in the comb-over world championships Donald Trump.Bossa is trying to keep its game relevant and entertaining to watch since Surgeon Simulator has already found a lot of success by catering to a crowd that wants to livestream funny and strange experiences to their personal YouTube and Twitch channels.Adding The Donald, who is the GOP s next great hope, could get a few more people to boot up the game during their video broadcasts.Surgeon Simulator is a game where players control a pair of hands that must perform organ transplants and other delicate medical procedures.The problem is that you have a little too much control over the limbs, and they are difficult to maneuver in an accurate way.This can lead to issues when you go in to slice open a patient with a scalpel and accidentally cut up all their vital tissues and organs in the process.We ll check out the game to see what procedures Trump requires — although I m betting he is requesting hand-enhancement surgery.Now, the goal of Surgeon Simulator is to save the patient, and I would suggest you try to play along — especially if you re broadcasting your game to Twitch.Don t make me write a story about how the Secret Service came to your house because you were laughing while letting former reality-television star and depressing reflection of society Donald Trump perish.
NEW YORK AP — Scientists proposed a long-term project Thursday that involves creating DNA blueprints for making human beings, a prospect some observers find troubling.That might help scientists identify the effects of genetic mutations, or create safer stem cells for transplantation, said the researchers, George Church of Harvard University and Jef Boeke of New York University.The main goal of the new project is to cut the cost of engineering and testing big genomes more than a thousand-fold in 10 years.Other potential payoffs from the project include engineering virus resistance into mammal cells that are used to make medicines, so that infections don't shut down production, he said.The researchers aim to launch the effort this year after raising $100 million in support from public, private, philanthropic, industry and academic sources from around the world.They said it's hard to estimate the total cost of the project, but that it's likely less than the $3 billion Human Genome Project, which revealed the makeup of the human DNA.
Some scientists want to create a synthetic human genome, and their proposal has critics worked up into a frenzy.In a perfect world, this proposed synthetic human genome would be used to grow human organs for transplant, aid humans in developing medications and vaccines for various illnesses, and more.In a less-than-ideal world, critics worry it could also lead to the creation of a human without parents, to designer humans with specific attributes.The collective anticipates needing $100 million in funding which could come from both private and public sources.Some scientists who aren t part of the project have expressed their agreement toward it, saying it could have benefits for future research.Noted by Reuters, Synthetic Biology Professor John Ward of University College London said, The project is not as controversial as some observers might be saying.
Part-human, part-piggy creatures not pictured have reportedly been created by a bunch of mad scientists over at the University of California, Davis, leading to uproar and a mind-blowing glimpse into the potential future of medicine.The team, led by Professor Pablo Ross, is said to have managed to successfully combine human stem cells and pig DNA.The resultant 'chimera' embryos were killed off after 28 days, with the researchers believing that the animals would have grown to become pigs with internal organs fit for humans.Scientists are currently working on ways to deal with a shortage of organ donors, and -- religious beliefs aside -- pigs are believed to be ideal incubators."I m nervous about opening up a new source of animal suffering," said Peter Stevenson, from Compassion in World Farming, to the BBC s Panorama show.If there is still a shortage after that, we can consider using pigs, but on the basis that we eat less meat so that there is no overall increase in the number of pigs being used for human purposes."
The plans are controversial and last year the main US medical research agency, the National Institutes of Health, banned funding for such experiments.Critics say the research could lead to the development of organ farms.If there is still a shortage after that we can consider using pigs, but on the basis that we eat less meat so that there is no overall increase in the number of pigs being used for human purposes.Other concerns relate to the possibility that the implanted human cells might migrate to the developing pig s brain and make it more human.To create the chimeras - named after the creatures from Greek mythology made up of more than one animal - scientists use CRISPR gene editing to remove DNA from a newly-fertilised pig embryo that would enable the resulting foetus to grow a pancreas.The research will be outlined in Panorama - Medicine s Big Breakthrough: Editing Your Genes on Monday at 8.30pm on BBC One.
Part-human, part-piggy creatures not pictured have reportedly been created by a bunch of mad scientists over at the University of California, Davis, leading to uproar and a mind-blowing glimpse into the potential future of medicine.The team, led by Professor Pablo Ross, is said to have managed to successfully combine human stem cells and pig DNA.The resultant 'chimera' embryos were killed off after 28 days, with the researchers believing that the animals would have grown to become pigs with internal organs fit for humans.Scientists are currently working on ways to deal with a shortage of organ donors, and -- religious beliefs aside -- pigs are believed to be ideal incubators."I m nervous about opening up a new source of animal suffering," said Peter Stevenson, from Compassion in World Farming, to the BBC s Panorama show.If there is still a shortage after that, we can consider using pigs, but on the basis that we eat less meat so that there is no overall increase in the number of pigs being used for human purposes."
In September of last year, the US National Institutes of Health said it would not fund this type of research until more was known about the implications.Image: UC Davis/RossTo create the human-pig embryos, the researchers used CRISPR to knock out the genetic information required for the fetus to grow a pancreas, resulting in a genetic niche.This concept, originally known as xenotransplantation, has been around since the 1970s.Needless to say, animal rights advocates aren t thrilled with this approach.If there is still a shortage after that, we can consider using pigs, but on the basis that we eat less meat so that there is no overall increase in the number of pigs being used for human purposes.And indeed, there are other research efforts currently underway that won t require the use of animals, such as bioprinting, advances in cold storage, and the promising field of regenerative medicine where biologists can literally grow a patient s organs in the lab.
Developed countries may meet demand better than the rest, but even so, patients here are still underserved.The results are human-pig chimeras, which remain in live sows for 28 days before the scientists terminate the pregnancy and remove the embryonic tissue for study.Using a gene editing technique called CRISPR, scientists first remove the part of a freshly fertilized pig embryo s DNA that instructs the fetus to grow a pancreas.In September, the United States s National Institute of Health NIH said it would not fund any research in which human pluripotent cells are introduced into non-human vertebrate animal pre-gastrulation stage embryos… In other words, although the NIH may reconsider its position in the future, it refuses to participate in any current research that entails growing human organs in non-humans.Meanwhile, organizations against animal testing and factory farming are unsettled by the research.If there is still a shortage after that, we can consider using pigs, but on the basis that we eat less meat so that there is no overall increase in the number of pigs being used for human purposes.
Scientists studying toxicity in chemicals feed, inject, or spray them on animals to suss out potential ill effects.But Congress is now finally updating the Toxic Substance Control Act of 1976, which will among other things encourage the Environmental Protection Agency to find alternatives to animal testing.The updated act, which is expected to pass both houses of Congress soon, asks the EPA to consider a suite of new testing technologies, such as high-throughput robots that apply chemicals to cells in petri dishes and algorithms that predict toxicity based on the effects of similar chemicals.Unlike more developed technologies like high-throughput screening and algorithms though, the human body on a chip could not just match animal testing s utility but exceed it.Kulp works on a team making a system called iCHIP that connects four organs: the brain, the peripheral nervous system, the blood-brain barrier, and the heart.Pharmaceutical companies are already interested though, and if organs on a chip do make it out into the real world, it ll likely be for uses where animals already fall short.
Rick Wherley / Cleveland Museum of Natural History A new praying mantis has been identified, and like Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, it has a fondness for prominent neckwear.The new leaf-dwelling species was discovered in the wilds of Madagascar and named Ilomantis ginsburgae, after Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg."This species description of Ilomantis ginsburgae is novel since it relied heavily on the features of the female genitalia," lead author Sydney Brannoch, a Case Western Reserve University doctoral candidate, said in a statement.More from LiveScience:Leaf-dwellerThe creature in question was first discovered in Madagascar in 1967, but the specimen has been housed at the French National Museum of Natural History in Paris ever since."Developing new characteristics, especially from female specimens, helps us not only test the validity of species, but makes identification much easier," said study co-author Gavin Svenson, curator of invertebrate zoology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.If a person finds one sex, they may only be able to identify the specimen if their specimen's sex matches what is known from previous research.
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