the working of social class are people earning in the Uk in well-paid occupations, on average, 17 percent less than the same professions of the upper classes from the people, says recent scientific article.Professor Daniel lauris in the works at Swarthmore college in the United states in Pennsylvania, and professor Sam Friedman is working with the London School of Economics -university of London.Lauris and Friedman are exploring how social background or social class affects the Uk people pay, when this is progressing well paid expert or manager in the profession.the Professors found in their study that working class people deserve a top-level specialist and managerial occupations on average 17% less than the upper classes from the people.social class due to the difference in pay lead to the 7 350 pounds, or 8 700 € smaller in revenue, a research article summary in.
By the end of the 90-minute special, it s really not clear what Geraldo believes is going on within the Satanic underground, or if he even believes it exists at all.Set in Charleston, South Carolina, Exorcism introduces Abby, a working-class loner who s befriended maybe even rescued by Gretchen, a too-sheltered rich kid who bonds with Abby during a disastrous early- 80s birthday party.A few years later, the now-teenaged chums find their long-time bond challenged after a one-off acid trip, during which Gretchen disappears into darkened woods.The corpse in question is that of a largely average high-school jock whose suicide upends a rural Pennsylvania town—but whose death also brings together the unadventurous Hannah with Lacey, a class-cutting, chain-smoking, Kurt Cobain-obsessed alternakid who draws Hannah out of her happily PG existence and into a dizzying spree-turned-spiral of drugs, parties and, eventually, some blood-drenched, semi-Satanic antics.It s a decision that leads to Lacey being accused of Satanic tendencies, and that finally brings all three girls, guided by sinister motivations, to the same woods where their former classmate turned up dead.Like Exorcism s Abby and Gretchen, Fire s Lacey and Hannah are outsiders whose relationship flourishes in an environment of latchkey laissez faire-ness and shenanigans-inspiring boredom.
Pittsburgh s mayor said the city is hoping to develop a $100 million smart city war chest by leveraging funds from the federal Smart City Challenge and from the state.According to the Pittsburgh Business Times, Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto said the city is looking to leverage up to $100 million dollars if Pittsburgh is chosen winner of the Smart City Challenge from a field of seven cities.The winning city will receive $50 million in funding from private and federal government sources for the introduction of new technologies that will improve mobility and transportation.The funding would support the city s ambitious proposal to redesign its transportation and energy infrastructure, said Wolf spokesman Jeffrey Sheridan said of the $11 million state pledge.The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has worked closely with the city regarding this proposal and has committed to provide additional state funding if the city s proposal is successful.May 20 is the deadline for final application, and the government says it plans to announce the winning city at the end of June.
Don t look know, but if you re cruising around downtown Pittsburgh, the next Ford you overtake might be a self-driving Uber.On Thursday, the on-demand driving service took the wraps off its autonomous vehicles: modified Ford Focus hybrids outfitted with myriad sensors that the company began testing near its Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based Advanced Technology research center several weeks ago.They can be switched to a manual driving mode at any time, and automatically disable self-driving with a loud beep when the onboard computer can t determine a way around an obstacle.The company began prototyping vehicles 10 to 15 years ago in the California badlands, and in 2013, founded the core of its Advanced Technology Center by controversially poaching 40 of Carnegie Mellon University s National Robotics Engineer Center s NREC top researchers.Uber s focus on self-driving cars remains mostly technological for now, but the transportation behemoth is one of several firms that are lobbying lawmakers to formulate guidelines for self-driving technologies.And in developing nations, the company is under pressure to reduce fares — earlier this month, Apple, a company with reported self-driving car ambitions of its own, invested $1 billion in rival service Didi Chuxing.
A photo has emerged of Uber's self-driving car.The taxi-hailing company plans to test the car on the streets of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.3.The EU wants to force Netflix and Amazon to show more European television.A global venture capital firm called e.ventures has raised a new $150 million £102 million fund.Microsoft is building a "concierge" bot that acts like your personal assistant.Google is battling a demand from a French regulator to remove certain search results globally.
Taxi app company Uber has made its biggest move towards driverless cars to date with initial trials of the technology in Pennsylvania, US.The company has equipped a hybrid Ford Fusion with several sensors, including radars, laser scanners, and high resolution cameras.Uber said that a trained driver will always be in the driver's seat to monitor operations, including when the vehicle is in self-driving mode.In a statement, the company said that real-world testing is critical to its efforts to develop self-driving technology, showing Uber is deeply vested in making driverless cars part of its servies."Helping reducing road accidents and deaths, congestion and transportation costs are the goals at the heart of Uber's mission to make transportation as reliable as running water -- everywhere and for everyone," it reads.The group plans to work with policymakers to identify the appropriate solutions that support the deployment of self-driving vehicles.
But 59 year-old Gary Fisher, a retired software engineer from Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania, has a mission: to convince lawmakers that going to Mars is both possible and affordable—if they d just give NASA a little more money.asked Mo Brooks, a Republican representative from Alabama whose congressional district includes NASA s Huntsville Space Flight Center but who, to be fair, also believes that the country could likely go bankrupt within a decade .He likened federal spending on a Mars mission—white boots on the ground by the mid-2030s—to the federal government s investment in the airline industry during the Recession of the 1930s.On Thursday, Weir donned a beige golf cap and wrinkled brown shirt to address congressional staffers in a Russell Office Building briefing room.We re in a tough budget environment, no secret there, the aide said.Last month, the House approved a $19.5 billion NASA budget, half a billion dollars more than NASA asked for overall.
View photosFILE - In this April 23, 2016 file photo, Solar Impulse 2 lands at Moffett Field in Mountain View, Calif., completing the leg of its journey from Hawaii in its attempt to circumnavigate the globe.A solar-powered airplane that landed in Oklahoma last week is headed to Ohio on the latest leg of its around-the-world journey.The Swiss-made Solar Impulse 2 took off from Tulsa International Airport about 5 a.m. Saturday, May 21, 2016, with a destination of Dayton, Ohio.AP Photo/Noah Berger, File MoreDAYTON, Ohio AP — A solar-powered airplane's planned flight from Ohio to Pennsylvania has been postponed.Officials say that during a failure of the cabinet of the Solar Impulse's mobile hangar, the plane was briefly touched by the hangar's fabric.The globe-circling voyage began in March from Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, and made stops in Oman, Myanmar, China and Japan.
The Hard Thing Rule lets you lead by example and keep your kids on track.Angela Duckworth, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Grit, suggests the three-part Hard Thing Rule will set things in motion:Everyone in the family has to do something that s hard.No one gets to pick the hard thing for anyone else.This rule gives them the freedom to pursue something they re interested in, and it teaches them the importance of sticking with things when the going gets tough.It s also a great incentive for you to finish your own projects and show your kids that working hard is worthwhile.Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance Amazon via Business Insider
Image: Goldfinger, 1964 Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-center hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different—some say annoyingly loud—sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminum baseball bat—a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
In this photo provided by Solar Impulse, "Solar Impulse 2," the solar airplane of Swiss pioneers Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg, moves through the sky shortly after the take off from Dayton International Airport, in Dayton, Ohio to Lehigh Valley International Airport in Allentown, Pa., on Wednesday, May 25, 2016.Jean Revillard/Solar Impulse via AP DAYTON, Ohio — A solar-powered airplane has taken off from the Ohio hometown of America aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright on the latest leg of its journey around the world.The globe-circling voyage began in March 2015 from Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, and made stops in Oman, Myanmar, China and Japan.The Solar Impulse 2's wings, which stretch wider than those of a Boeing 747, are equipped with 17,000 solar cells that power propellers and charge batteries.The plane runs on stored energy at night.Project officials say the layovers give the two Swiss pilots — Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg — a chance to swap places and engage with local communities along the way so they can explain the project, which is estimated to cost more than $100 million.
View photosFILE - In this April 23, 2016 file photo, Solar Impulse 2 lands at Moffett Field in Mountain View, Calif., completing the leg of its journey from Hawaii in its attempt to circumnavigate the globe.The Swiss-made Solar Impulse 2 took off from Tulsa International Airport about 5 a.m. Saturday, May 21, 2016, with a destination of Dayton, Ohio.AP Photo/Noah Berger, File MoreDAYTON, Ohio AP — The Latest on a solar-powered plane's flight from Ohio to Pennsylvania all times local :8:45 p.m.A solar-powered airplane has landed in Pennsylvania, about 17 hours after it took off from the Ohio hometown of America aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright.The globe-circling voyage began in March 2015 from Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, and made stops in Oman, Myanmar, China and Japan.6 a.m.A solar-powered airplane has taken off from the Ohio hometown of America aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright on the latest leg of its journey around the world.The plane was expected to make at least one more stop in the United States — in New York — before crossing the Atlantic Ocean to Europe or northern Africa.
Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-centre hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different — some say annoyingly loud — sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminium baseball bat — a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-centre hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different — some say annoyingly loud — sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminium baseball bat — a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
Right up there with climate change and increased water scarcity is the issue of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and one particularly terrible variety of it -- bacteria resistant to so-called 'last resort' antibiotics, the very last-ditch solutions for resistant bugs.Now, for the first time, researchers have discovered this super-resistant bacteria in the United States, and they fear a gene in it mcr-1 could spread to other types of bacteria.The superbug was found in the urine of a 49-ear-old woman from Pennsylvania, and it is a type of E coli that is resistant to a last-resort antibiotic called colistin.Bacteria resistant to colistin has previously been found in several other regions, including Canada and South America, Europe, China, and Africa.Its newly arrived presence in the U.S. underscores the further proliferation of one of the modern world s greatest health threats and, according to CDC Direct Tom Frieden:It basically shows us that the end of the road isn t very far away for antibiotics — that we may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive-care units, of patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics.For now, the Centers for Disease Control are attempting to figure out where the aforementioned woman may have contracted the bacteria.
Image: Solar ImpulseOvernight, Solar Impulse safely touched down at Lehigh Valley International Airport in Pennsylvania.That s another 650 miles ticked off of its bid to circumnavigate the globe using only solar energy.The flight took almost 17 hours, with the airplane achieving an average speed of just 39 miles per hour.That s slow going, even for Solar Impulse—but in strong head winds, the aircraft occasionally generates only enough power to stop itself from travelling backwards.The airplane uses 17,000 solar panels on its wings to charge 2,077 pounds of lithium battery, so there s a lot of weight to carry, hence the slow speeds.From there, it will cross the Atlantic to either Europe or North Africa, then finally head for Abu Dhabi, where the attempt started.
FILE - In this April 23, 2016 file photo, Solar Impulse 2 lands at Moffett Field in Mountain View, Calif., completing the leg of its journey from Hawaii in its attempt to circumnavigate the globe.AP Photo/Noah Berger, File MoreDAYTON, Ohio AP -- A solar-powered airplane has landed in Pennsylvania, about 17 hours after it took off from the Ohio hometown of America aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright.The Solar Impulse 2's wings, which stretch wider than those of a Boeing 747, are equipped with 17,000 solar cells that power propellers and charge batteries.The plane runs on stored energy at night.The plane had a five-day trip from Japan to Hawaii The crew was forced to stay in Oahu, Hawaii, for nine months after the plane's battery system sustained heat damage on its trip from Japan.Project officials say the layovers give the two Swiss pilots — Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg — a chance to swap places and engage with local communities along the way so they can explain the project, which is estimated to cost more than $100 million.
Photographer: Jean Revillard / Rezo / All Over Press After some porblem is solplanet on with his world record try again. The solar-powered plane Solar Impulse 2 have little concern reached a further milestone on the way towards implementing the first världsomflygningen on just solar power. It was a flight from Dayton, Ohio, to the international airport Lehigh Valley in Pennsylvania a flight of almost 17 hours, according to AFP. It was the plane's 13th stage of the route of the 16 planned. The journey started in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates in March last year, and it is also the ultimate goal. Overall, the 35 000 kilometer journey supposed to take five months, of which 25 days in the air, but the damage to the battery made that the plane was standing in nine months.
Image: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionEarlier this month, a frightening report warned of an antibiotic-resistant superbug which might kill as many as 10 million people worldwide by 2050.According to a study published today by the American Society for Microbiology, a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman had a strain of E. coli that did not respond to the antibiotic colistin, which is a powerful drug-of-last-resort for treating particularly stubborn infections.The CDC is investigating the source of the superbug.There are alternatives to antibiotics, like strains of predatory bacteria that are currently being tested by DARPA, or, surprisingly, more powerful superbugs.But it s widely agreed among experts that the antibiotic apocalypse is impending.It basically shows us that the end of the road isn t very far away for antibiotics — that we may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive-care units, or patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics, CDC Director Tom Frieden told the Washington Post.
Jurors in San Francisco federal court on Thursday rejected that argument and concluded Google made fair use of the code under copyright law.A decision against Google had the potential to give significantly more weight to software copyrights, and to spur litigation to protect those added rights.Oracle -- which started the trial at an advantage with the judge explaining that it had already been established that Google had infringed Oracle s copyrights -- plans to appeal, though legal experts said overturning a jury verdict will be difficult.Google relied on witnesses including former Chief Executive Officer Eric Schmidt, who is now chairman of parent company Alphabet Inc., to convince jurors that it used Java to innovate, rather than merely copy code.We strongly believe that Google developed Android by illegally copying core Java technology to rush into the mobile device market,  Oracle General Counsel Dorian Daley said in a statement.That set the stage for the second trial, featuring many of the witnesses from four years ago as well as the same judge, William Alsup.Both sides leaned on powerful Silicon Valley personalities to put a shine on technology-laden arguments.Oracle Co-Chief Executive Officer Safra Catz invoked the Ten Commandments to characterize Google as acting above the law.The messages showed Google executives and engineers were concerned that they needed, and didn t get, a license for Java.Google co-founder Larry Page was confronted with a 2005 internal e-mail posing the question of whether to drop the use of Java for Android or press ahead, perhaps making enemies along the way.Michael Risch, a law professor at Villanova University School of Law in Pennsylvania who s been following the case, said it will be difficult for Oracle to overturn the jury verdict because an appeals court will have to conclude the instructions to jurors on the legal issues in the case were flawed.Before the verdict, Risch said the outcome was a toss-up and that it may not have been well-suited for a jury to decide.
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