This Wednesday, July 17, 2019, we celebrate World Emoji Day.The perfect opportunity for Google to present the 65 new ones that will come with Android 10 Q.The emojis are from the 2019 batch of Unicode consortium.Some of the more noteworthy additions include a sloth, falafels, otter, diya lamp, garlic, waffles, service dogs, an orangutan, and a skunk.You can view all the additions in the image below.Google says it’s also included 53 gender-inclusive designs for emojis where Unicode hasn’t specified a gender.
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Sprint is the latest telco to become the victim of cybercrime as an unknown number of customers have had their personal data eyed over by nefarious parties.In a letter sent to customers, Sprint has suggested a huge amount of personal information has been exposed to the darker corners of the internet.The hackers gained access via the Samsung ‘add a line’ website, with the total number of impacted customers being unknown for the moment.“On June 22, Sprint was informed of unauthorized access to your Sprint account using your account credentials via the Samsung.com ‘add a line’ website,” the letter states.“We take this matter, and all matters involving Sprint customer’s privacy, very seriously.”An ‘add a line’ website is one utilised by third-parties, mainly device manufacturers, if customers want to add an additional phone line to an existing contract with a telco.
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Millions of people in China used loan apps to borrow money, but they ended up paying with their privacy.A security researcher discovered a public database left exposed online containing sensitive data on more than 4.6 million devices, including location history, debt logs, financial information and contacts.The public database was growing, as these apps gathered data on people's activities and stored it the unsecured server in real time.The massive data leak contained a treasure trove of information on millions of Chinese citizens, including active updates on a person's location.The database also had names, birth dates, addresses, phone numbers, debt details and passwords stored on the exposed server."A series of actions were immediately taken to identify, alert and guide the customer, once Alibaba Cloud was informed about their database vulnerability hosted on our public cloud platform."
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Last month marked the 111th anniversary of the Tunguska event, a blast that flattened trees across half a million acres of Siberian forest on June 20, 1908.Scientists have been puzzling over the details ever since.We now have fresh evidence about what transpired back then, in the form of new data gleaned from a well-documented rare meteor burst near Chelyabinsk, Russia, in February 2013.They described a streak of light across the sky, followed by another flash of light and a loud sound with accompanying shock wave."Suddenly the sky appeared like it was split in two, high above the forest, the whole northern sky appeared to be completely covered with blazing fire," a farmer named Sergei Semenov recalled; he'd been having breakfast just 40 miles (64km) from the impact."At that moment, I felt a great wave of heat as if my shirt had caught fire."
FaceApp appears to be having a viral moment, again.The two-year-old AI-driven photo editor from Russian company Wireless Lab, which rose in popularity for its realistic facial transformations in photos, is back in the spotlight.This time it’s for a new aging feature that allow you to edit a person’s face to make them appear older or younger.— Kevin Clark (@vernalkick) July 15, 2019This has recently triggered an AgeChallenge (also FaceAppChallenge) on social media, and everyone’s hopping on board.But with the sudden surge in popularity have come fresh questions about privacy, and whether the app is doing enough to protect users’ data.
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Google has banned NYSE-listed Chinese app developer CooTek from its ad platforms and removed dozens of its apps from the Play store over violations of its advertising policies, Buzzfeed News reported.The Shanghai-based app developer was found to be using a malicious plug-in called BeiTaAd that bombards users with disruptive apps even after the company said it had stopped.Why it matters: As concerns about data privacy and cybersecurity are on the rise, app fraud in the Asia-Pacific region continues to outpace global rates.Malicious advertising practices are not uncommon in China even among major developers as evidenced by CooTek, a large, US-listed Chinese app developer with hundreds of apps and users in 240 countries, according to its website.The malware usually infects less popular apps and are relatively easy to catch, but plug-ins like BeiTaAd are becoming prevalent as they are well-hidden in apps that have large numbers of installs.Google’s ban will have a significant impact on CooTek’s revenue as app development and monetization from ads are its core businesses.
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Building any new digital product, service, or feature can be fraught with challenges from the outset — but when it’s ready to go to market, explaining clearly to users how it works and what its benefits are is integral to its chances of success.And that’s why Alexis Fogel, cofounder and former chief product officer at Dashlane, elected to launch Stonly, a startup that focuses squarely on helping product teams, customer support staff, and even bloggers explain how certain tools and services work.Stonly was founded in 2018, and for the past seven months it has been in private beta mode with a handful of customers — including its first client Dashlane — ahead of today’s official unveiling.In a nutshell, Stonly is striving to help businesses generate interactive, step-by-step online guides that can be embedded anywhere, such as a blog, a company’s customer support webpage, or directly inside customer support software such as Zendesk.“Stonly solves two problems that every company has: explaining how their product or service works, and providing accurate and digestible user support information,” Fogel told VentureBeat.By way of example, a company or publisher could create a guide on how to switch from iPhone to Android, how to manage your Facebook privacy, or how to activate dark mode in iOS 13, and then embed this walkthrough on a website — replete with text, photos, illustrations, videos, and code snippets.
AT was hit with a lawsuit Tuesday accusing it of selling customers’ real-time location data to third parties like credit agencies and bail guarantors, along with bounty hunters and stalkers, without having customer consent.The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and Pierce Bainbridge Beck Price & Hecht LLP are representing three AT customers in the class action suit against AT and other data aggregation companies, explicitly singling out LocationSmart and Zumigo.“The location data AT offered up for sale is extremely precise and can locate any of its wireless subscribers in real-time, providing a window into the intimate details of their lives: where they go to the doctor, where they worship, where they live, and much more,” said Abbye Klamann Ognibene, an associate at Pierce Bainbridge, said in an EFF press release.The press release points to an investigation by Motherboard from earlier this year that alleged major mobile networks like AT, T-Mobile and Sprint were selling access to customers’ location data to entities such as bounty hunters, car dealerships, or landlords.Tuesday’s lawsuit by the EFF alleges that AT violated the Federal Communications Act and engaged in deceptive practices.the EFF also said that AT, Zumigo and LocationSmart violated constitutional, statutory, and common law rights to privacy under California state law.
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Cloud-based productivity apps aren’t exactly the kinds of apps you’d normally think were deserving of being banned from a school.But a few schools in Germany have done just that, and Microsoft’s Office 365 is the target.According to TNW, German state Hesse has found that Office 365’s current configuration isn’t compliant enough with the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) guidelines to be utilized in German schools.According to a translated version of that statement, the first concern with using Office 365 in German public schools is that using the cloud service also involves schools having to store the personal data of children in a European cloud, which could, in turn, be accessible “by U.S. authorities.”As TNW notes, this particular issue came about because initially, such schools used to store this personal data in a German data center until Microsoft shut that center down in 2018.As a result, the storage of that data was moved to a European data center that may allow U.S. authorities access to that information.
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Sprint is informing customers today of a serious security breach that has exposed subscriber information like billing addresses, phone numbers, and other detailed account information, according to ZDNet.The breach is a result of vulernability, the details of which are currently unknown, in a Samsung website advertising an “add a line” feature for active Sprint account holders.Sprint explained the breach in a letter sent out to consumers that was obtained by ZDNet.In the letter, Sprint says it was informed of the “unauthorized access” back in late June:On June 22, Sprint was informed of unauthorized access to your Sprint account using your account credentials via the Samsung.com “add a line” website.We take this matter, and all matters involving Sprint customer’s privacy, very seriously.
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David Marcus, head of Facebook's cryptocurrency efforts, testified at a Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing about Libra, the social network's new cryptocurrency push.Marcus stated that the Libra Association, which will oversee Libra and be headquartered in Switzerland, will be regulated by the Swiss Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner (FDPIC).But the FDPIC says — and Facebook confirms — that it hasn't been in touch.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.At a US Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, Facebook said that Swiss authorities will regulate the Libra Association — a consortium of companies including Uber, Mastercard, and Facebook itself, which will itself oversee the new Libra cryptocurrency.The issue, it seems, is that this was news to those Swiss authorities.
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French drugmaker Sanofi recently appointed Chief Medical Officer Ameet Nathwani as its chief digital officer.But Nathwani says that the pharmaceutical industry also needs to be on high alert around issues of bias, privacy, and cybersecurity, "because this black box scenario isn't going to be sustainable."The pharmaceutical industry has to make sure "we develop trust for the patient and physician, because this black box scenario isn't going to be sustainable," Nathwani told Business Insider during a phone interview last month."It's evolved at a remarkable pace," Nathaniel Hook, managing director of global life sciences at the executive search firm WittKieffer, told Business Insider.Pharma companies are hiring chief digital officers to lead digital marketing, spearhead machine learning and AI in their drug research and development, and bring tech to streamline areas like supply chain operations.Nathwani said his goal is to create new business opportunities there.
Promises to go all Teddy Roosevelt on anti-trust if electedSpeaking at an event run the Jeff Bezos-owned Washington Post on Tuesday, the Democratic presidential hopeful offered his strongest position yet when it comes to taking action against Amazon, Facebook and Google, suggesting that broader political sentiment is moving against the tech trio.This time, when asked by the interviewer whether a Sanders Administration would split up the online giants, he said, simply, "absolutely."Sanders also said that the reported record $5bn fine that the FTC will impose on Facebook for its terrible data privacy practices was not a sufficiently strong measure.Those comments come on the same day that Facebook will be heavily criticized in Congress over its proposal to introduce a new cryptocurrency called Libra.But Amazon also got it in the neck; the online retailer was "moving very rapidly to be a monopoly," Sanders argued.
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On August 16, Tesla will begin charging an additional $1,000 for the "full self-driving" upgrade, CEO Elon Musk announced on Twitter on Tuesday.It's the latest in a series of price changes for a package whose main function—"full self-driving"—is still largely aspirational.The price hike reflects Musk's view that Tesla is less than 18 months away from delivering full self-driving technology to customers and that this capability will drastically increase the value of Tesla vehicles."If you buy a Tesla today, I believe you are buying an appreciating asset – not a depreciating asset," Musk said in an April podcast episode.If his predictions are correct, the full self-driving package should be worth tens of thousands of dollars by the end of next year—which makes next month's expected hike from $6,000 to $7,000 look quite modest in comparison.Of course, Musk's predictions may not be correct.
Adobe, Microsoft and SAP have demonstrated a working system using a common data platform the companies announced last autumn.CNBC said on Tuesday it had seen a demonstration of the system developed by the Open Data Initiative, which aims to pose a challenge to Salesforce, the market leader in digital sales tools.Microsoft’s senior director for the Power Platform series of products Richard Riley demonstrated how the system could allow users to easily send data from software including Microsoft Dynamics, Adobe Experience Platform and SAP’s C/4HANA to Microsoft’s Azure Data Lake public cloud data warehouse.The data is aggregated in a common format, allowing it to be processed by analytics tools and sent back to tools from Microsoft, Adobe and SAP.The system could boost Microsoft’s cloud-based Dynamics 365 for Sales against Salesforce’s Sales Cloud, as well as driving more traffic to Microsoft’s Azure cloud platform.Microsoft said the open data tools would allow companies to reduce the resources they spend on preparing data for processing and analysing the data.
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Over the past decade, a major trend in electronics has been the development of sensors, displays and smart devices which are seamlessly integrated onto the human body.Most of these wearable devices are singularly connected to a user's smart phone and transmit all data via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi signals.But as consumers wear increasing numbers of wearable devices, and as the data they transmit increases in sophistication, more innovative connection methods are being sought after.This 'wireless body sensor network' allows devices to transmit data with 1,000 times stronger signal than conventional technologies, meaning the battery life of all devices is dramatically improved.Wireless networks of these wearable devices on a body have future applications in health monitoring, medical interventions and human-machine interfaces.Better data transmission, greater privacy
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US lawmakers on Tuesday expressed skepticism about Facebook's plans to launch a new cryptocurrency called Libra in 2020, highlighting the trust issues that continue to plague the world's largest social network.Numerous senators told Facebook's blockchain boss David Marcus during a congressional hearing that it simply didn't trust the social network given the company's bad track record when it comes to privacy and security.The lawmakers brought up a list of Facebook scandals, including how the social network was exploited for election meddling and played a role in furthering hate speech that fueled a genocide in Myanmar.Sen. Sherrod Brown, an Ohio Democrat, compared the social network to a toddler playing with matches.Marcus defended the social network's cryptocurrency plans and vowed not to launch Libra before addressing regulatory concerns."If America doesn't lead innovation in digital currency and payments area, others will," Marcus said before the US Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.
No matter how large the display or realistic the graphics, a great gaming experience isn’t complete without high-quality audio.You can go with installing speakers but if you want some privacy from the things around you, a gaming headset is your best option.Whether you’re building a new gaming setup or looking to upgrade, now’s your chance to score amazing deals on gaming headphones.The bestselling HyperX Cloud II and the newly released Corsair HS60 are both available at massive discounts just for Amazon’s Prime Day – sale prices are $70 and $40 respectively.This next-generation headset produces virtual 7.1 surround sound with depth and distance to enhance your gaming, music, or movie experience.It’s equipped with an advanced audio control box that makes it easy to activate noise and echo cancellation and automatic gain control (AGC) functionality, so you can enjoy amplified audio, clearer voice quality, and reduced background noise.
A Swiss regulatory agency that Facebook executive David Marcus said in congressional testimony would be responsible for overseeing data and privacy protections for the company’s newly launched cryptocurrency, Libra, has not been contacted by Facebook, according to a report.CNBC is reporting that the Swiss Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner, who Marcus said would oversee data protections for its cryptocurrency in his testimony before the Senate Banking Committee, has yet to hear from the company which is depending on it for oversight.We have taken note of the statements made by David Marcus, Chief of Calibra, on our potential role as data protection supervisory authority in the Libra context.Until today we have not been contacted by the promoters of Libra… We expect Facebook or its promoters to provide us with concrete information when the time comes.Only then will we be able to examine the extent to which our legal advisory and supervisory competence is given.In any case, we are following the development of the project in the public debate.
For the ongoing series, Code Word, we’re exploring if — and how — technology can protect individuals against sexual assault and harassment, and how it can help and support survivors.Hollywood has us believing that spyware technology is only used by secret-agent hackers who plant tracking devices in car wheels or in the soles of shoes.It’s harnessed to become a dangerous weapon that strips people of their privacy all too often — especially women in abusive relationships.There are also apps like Absher, a government-based mobile app in Saudi Arabia, which came under criticism earlier this year amid claims that it reinforced the country’s system of male guardianship.Earlier this year, the domestic-violence charity, Refuge, estimated that around 95 percent of its cases involved technology-based abuse.Last month, Citizen Lab published a comprehensive study on stalkerware and other software that’s commonly used by abusive partners to spy on their partners called “The Predator in your Pocket.”
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