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This is the final part of a series by HuffPost UK about county lines drug dealing in Britain.One afternoon in August 2018, two officers knocked on Abdi’s mum’s door and confirmed the worst: eight months after he had gone missing, her son’s body had been found. “I’d routinely walk to a nearby creek just to see if his body would wash up there,” she told HuffPost UK.“I would drop my children off at school then jump on buses, looking on the upper decks, to try and find him; I would stand by the window at home looking for him. I was on heightened alert. Any time I heard a siren I’d fear the worst.”Abdi Ali was murdered in what is believed to be a drug dispute.“The first night my son didn’t come home, I didn’t eat or sleep well at all,” his mother told us, “which set the tone for the next eight months. I didn’t spend an hour of peace.”She says the loss of her son has devastated her family. “If my children even look at Abdi’s old bedroom, to this date, they always cry,” she said.Like many of the parents who spoke to HuffPost UK for this series, her nightmare started when her son’s behaviour began to change. Shortly before he went missing, Abdi was arrested because a shop owner told police he had been browsing through knives, something his mother said was completely out of character. On another occasion, he was arrested for carrying a sharp weapon.But she maintains that, had the authorities done their jobs properly, the outcome would have been different.It is the first time she has given an interview since her son’s killing. She has asked us not to use her real name as her family try to rebuild their lives.“My boy, who had many things to look forward to – his life was cut short in the most horrific way.“The police did a poor job. They were constantly at my house with questions. If they took the matter seriously and acted on it, Abdi would be alive today,” she said.During the months that her son was missing, Abdi’s mum said the Met failed to contact the youth centre he was last seen visiting, and didn’t trace his mobile phone, which was still ringing days after he disappeared. Instead, they targeted his family.She would pass information from the local community to the police about where her son might be, but she says these lines of enquiry were never explored. Yet on one occasion, she says, dozens of officers stormed her house and searched it to the point where they broke furniture, “uprooting wardrobes and beds, throwing clothes on the floor”.Extended family and friends had to organise a collection for them to buy new furniture. They didn’t file a complaint against the police for fear that it would negatively impact the investigation into Abdi’s disappearance.A lack of confidence in the police prevented Abdi’s mum and her husband from reporting their son missing for two weeks. They had “no reason to suspect that he was in danger” and resolved not to “escalate” matters by involving the police.The family struggles financially. Beds are still broken from the raid and a bathroom pipe that was cracked during the incident is still leaking, creating hazardous conditions including damp and slippery floors for Abdi’s sister, who lives with a serious health condition. The family say their landlord, L&Q, hasn’t helped and the family can’t afford to pay for it to be fixed.A Met Police spokesperson told HuffPost UK: “As is standard in any missing person enquiry, a search of the family home was carried out. We have no record of any damage occurring or of a claim from the family for any repair at the time.”A spokesperson for L&Q said the housing association had no record of a police raid causing damage at the property, but that workers had “attended the property on a number of occasions to investigate and rectify issues relating to heating and water leaks as they have been reported to us”.L&Q says it will visit the house again this week to see what else needs doing.Since her son’s death, no social workers have visited to check on the welfare of Abdi’s siblings and she’s had no contact from the Met Police’s victim support team. Enfield Council, the family’s local authority, declined to comment on “individual cases”.Through grassroots north London charity Minority Matters, HuffPost UK has spoken to several mothers who have all echoed Abdi’s mum’s concerns about the police not taking their children’s disappearances seriously enough.In some cases officers tell worried parents that, once a person is over the age of 18, they are classed as an adult meaning that they are prioritised below missing children who are deemed to be more vulnerable. In other instances, when police officers do come into contact with young people who are dealing drugs, parents believe they don’t appreciate the gravity of the situation, or the fact that dealing is related to trafficking. The police are not arresting the masterminds behind the county lines – just our kids who are stuck in this vicious cycleCarol Smith*One mother, Carol Smith*, said when she reported her groomed 16-year-old to the police she was advised by officers not to be too harsh on him because he was “at that age”.“When the children are vulnerable and police know that they are vulnerable, they are still harsh in the way that they treat them. As though they’re enemies,” one mother told HuffPost UK.The surge in drug convictions and arrests – an increase of more than two-thirds in five years – has done little to quell county lines activity.Smith said: “The police are not arresting the masterminds behind the county lines – just our kids who are stuck in this vicious cycle. They get caught, serve time, get out and are back in the same place because the environment is the same. The same people that groom and exploit are here.”We put this to the Met Police’s deputy assistant commissioner Graham McNulty, who also leads the National Police Chiefs’ Council work on county lines.He told us he could not comment on specific cases, saying the force had made good recent progress cracking down on drug trafficking networks. “I would never say we’re perfect,” he said, “and things do go wrong in policing but my officers now understand more about the symptoms of young people being groomed and exploited.”Speaking to HuffPost UK, he said: “My view is, over the last year, we have absolutely put our focus on the line holders and the people at the top of this trade and I am determined that we are going to continue that and take more of them out in the year ahead – because of the abhorrent nature in which they exploit young and vulnerable people.”McNulty, who was appointed as NPCC county lines lead in November 2019, said as well as focusing more on the line leaders at the root of gang activity, he had overseen better collaborative working between national police forces, and pushed for harsher penalties “so that people driving the lines started to feel the consequences of what they’re doing”.The Met has arrested nearly 500 line holders and their associates, McNulty said. Against those 500, nearly 900 charges have been made – the vast majority for supply of drugs – while some 255 lines have been closed coming out of London.“During the course of those operations, we’ve rescued 98 young or vulnerable people who were being exploited,” said McNulty. “We’ve also upped our focus on applying modern day slavery charges to line leaders and not just locking people up for drug dealing, so they feel the consequences of their behaviour for the abuse they’ve wreaked.“The proof is in the pudding and of those arrests, you’ll appreciate that there’s a lot awaiting trial but 74 have gone to trial, they’ve all been convicted and 98% of them – which is a figure I’ve never seen before – pleaded guilty because of the weight of evidence against them. In 30 years of policing, I’ve never seen that.”Angie Patterson* told HuffPost UK her family had been let down by social services after her son Oscar* was groomed at the age of 13. This was back in 2012, when county lines grooming wasn’t yet fully recognised as child exploitation.“From the point of me raising concerns, none of the agencies such as St Giles Trust [a charity that assists vulnerable people] or social services around my son at that point were willing to take them seriously. Generally social services weren’t fit for purpose – they were accustomed to dealing with cases of parents not wanting their child, not children repeatedly going missing from home, missing school. The majority of social workers I came across weren’t interested and nobody was concerned why what was happening was happening.”A St Giles Trust spokesperson said the charity has helped 966 children and young people “make a safe and sustained exit from county line exploitation or reduce their involvement in it” this year alone.“This is complex work and it can take many years before positive progress occurs,” they added. “The journey itself is often rocky, with young people dipping in and out of county lines over time before they turn their life around. The vast number of families and young people we support feed back to us that their lives have been changed for the better as a result of our support.”In one week, Patterson said she called the local missing people’s helpline – which was run by individual police forces at the time – at least 20 times to flag her son’s regular disappearances. The service has since been replaced by the Home Office-funded Missing People’s SafeCall service.On one occasion, upon his return, she recalled how a social worker nonchalantly appeared to shrug off the issue and said: “Ah, at least he’s back now.”Between his goings and comings, she began to find train tickets in the pockets of his laundry showing he had been to areas in Essex – miles away from their north London home. He even jumped out of his bedroom window to avoid confronting his mother after being called by county lines associates to leave the house.“Each time he came back, you could really see the strain of heavy manipulation and control – the fear in his face,” she said. “On one occasion, he escaped from wherever he was and ran home. He stank – you could tell he hadn’t washed for days.“My son was like a zombie. He wouldn’t speak to me, and we were close. Oscar was completely out of touch with reality – desensitised. Whatever threats he was facing, I can’t imagine.”Oscar is now serving time in prison for drug-related charges after being assigned “at least 10” social workers in the space of eight years.Tanya Mitchell’s* 20-year-old son Myles was excluded from school after police found him with a machete in his school bag, aged 16. The headteacher said “we don’t want thugs in our school,” she told HuffPost UK. But she says son was never a thug – he had been groomed, something she began to suspect when Myles’ behaviour began to change drastically in his early teens.She tried to tell his school this before they kicked him out.“I contacted the school several times – via email and telephone – and suggested my son was being groomed. The response was: ‘Oh it’s fine, he hasn’t said anything’s wrong; if there’s a problem, I’m sure we can let social services know and they can deal with it,’” Mitchell explained.The exclusion triggered a downwards spiral that led to a stabbing attack, an increase in disappearances, and, Mitchell suspects, sexual abuse.“I think he was being sexually exploited and I understand that is quite common, even with boys, who are groomed,” Mitchell said.“I’ve got no evidence but I think he was filmed or pictured in a compromising position and he was blackmailed. We only have one photograph of him since he was 14 – my son used to love being photographed but if I go anywhere near him with a camera, he just goes completely mad shouting: ‘Get that away from me.’“The way he talks about men has changed. He became obsessed with paedophilia all of a sudden, started to come out with homophobic comments, which is not how he was raised at all.”Now Myles is 20 years old. He is agoraphobic and hasn’t left the house in two years. “It took me nearly two years to drill into the youth offending team that my son had been groomed.“One officer said: ‘Well, he’s not said anything about modern slavery.’ Of course he’s not going to. They’re on another planet.“Parents are blamed all the time – but we’re traumatised too.”Professionals have said grooming gangs “scout for children perceived as being ‘naughty’”.Cheryl Phoenix, executive director of The Black Child Agenda, supports children and families who face discrimination within the education system. Black children are three times as likely to be permanently excluded from school as white British pupils.“County lines are the after-effect of what’s going on with the education system and the discrimination against and bullying of Black families in particular,” she said. “Black children are more likely to be excluded, so with that exclusion that means you have children on the streets. If they’re on the streets that means they’re easily accessible by these gangs. The majority of these young people on the road have been permanently excluded from schools.“Gang leaders go as far as sexually abusing these children – boys and girls – and filming it, threatening to put it out in the public domain via social media if they don’t do as they’re told. This is very, very common. So it’s not like a lot of these kids are aggressive, violent animals as they’re described in the media. A lot of them are frightened little children who don’t know what to do or where to go for help.“You’ll find that even in prisons there’s a disproportionate number of Black men whose needs weren’t met when they were at school and were left to languish in pupil referral units [PRUs – a type of school that caters for children who aren’t able to attend a mainstream school due to a need for greater support], where they’ve been groomed in gang life. PRUs are a sin bin where they dump children, leave them and forget about them.“You have to look at the bigger picture: a lot of the PRUs are run by G4S security, which also runs a lot of prisons across the UK and works with social services. They took Black people out of chains [after slavery] but have they?”Black men are 26% more likely than white men to be remanded in custody. The 2017 Lammy Review of the treatment of Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups in the UK justice system found Black people were 53% more likely to be sent to prison even when factoring in higher not-guilty plea rates.Lammy concluded that the justice system was biased against this group, and required reform. While none of his recommendations have been implemented, the government has launched a £2.5bn programme to create 10,000 additional prison places.McNulty said: “We know that crime doesn’t affect everyone equally. Some of our Black communities in London are impacted more by violence and drugs – I think that’s undisputable, the figures are there. “That means it’s incumbent upon policing to absolutely make sure it works hard in those areas to deliver justice and it may well be the case that more young Black men are arrested for drugs but I’d like to reassure you that, in the county lines effort, our focus has been those at the top of the line.”Aasmina’s* son Kieran* is currently serving a life prison sentence for a fatal stabbing over drugs in 2013, aged 26. She paid for the victim’s funeral and the two families, both Somali, made peace with one another.Kieran had been groomed into county lines activity years earlier, at the age of 13, as was his victim. Despite frequent disappearances, as is commonplace with children trapped in county lines, Aasmina said they were let down by the authorities. He was expelled from school for “acting out” and sent to a PRU where things quickly began to unravel.“He attended school with my two other sons and teachers would make comments about him during parents evening, that he was ‘different’ to the other two. They alluded to Kieran’s mental health and learning difficulties – but didn’t specify and there was never any plan to support him,” she told HuffPost UK.“There are challenges that come with education. When children start acting out, there’s no support given to them, nothing to fall back on – so when they drop out of school they fall into criminal behaviour. It started with my son refusing to go to the PRU – by then he already had outside friends.”Kieran had always made it clear that he was a part of a gang and even said, aged 15, that he had “no choice” but to sell drugs. Aasmina explained that she tried her best to help her son, even offering to uproot the entire family and leave the UK.“My son said he’s at the point of no return because he’s involved. ‘You guys don’t get it. It’s not just my life I’m scared for. If I don’t do what they want then they’ll come for you as well. So I do what I do to protect you.’ I felt terrible hearing him say that. It affected my emotional and mental wellbeing, I became depressed, I couldn’t sleep and started to isolate myself from friends and family. I couldn’t deal with the weight of it.”In prison now, Kieran recently told his mother: “Please don’t think that I wasn’t hearing you guys when you said the gang is bad news and warning me about the path I was on. But what you guys didn’t understand is that I didn’t have a choice.” Mayor of London Sadiq Khan told HuffPost UK nearly £4m had been invested into City Hall’s “rescue and response” programme, working to intervene and support young people caught up in county lines, while 1,100 young Londoners have been referred for specialist support over the last two years – half of them under 18.Khan told HuffPost UK: “Criminals and gangs have used the uncertainty created by Covid-19 to recruit disadvantaged young Londoners. We know that those running county lines have altered their dealing hours and locations to blend in with lockdown measures, and they have increasingly used social media to recruit young people, many of whom have lost their jobs and in some cases their homes.“We’re only scratching the surface of a major national issue that is still driving violence in London and across the country.”He is calling on the government to “reverse the damaging cuts to local and social services – many of which are on the front line in the battle to tackle this issue”.Responding to the mayor’s statements, Aisha Ahmed – development manager at Minority Matters – told HuffPost UK: “It is ironic that he’s now using Covid, lockdown, loss of jobs and police cuts. Seriously, children and young people were vulnerable and openly being recruited in places where they were supposed to be safe. What has Sadiq done to protect the families? Why are there so many drugs on our streets and neighbourhoods?”As well as 20,000 police officers lost to austerity, recent analysis by the YMCA charity found local authority spend on youth services had dropped 69% from £1.4bn to £429m between 2010 and 2019, resulting in the loss of 750 youth centres. In the first five years of austerity, local authority budgets were cut by 40% amounting to an estimated £18bn lost from care provision for those most in need. The government disputes that cuts are to blame.When HuffPost UK asked the Home Office about concerns around austerity and the impact it has had on young people – specifically Black and minority ethnic communities – the department pointed towards recent funding that has been rolled out.Policing minister Kit Malthouse said: “The government is determined to end the scourge of county lines and tackle the vile criminals exploiting vulnerable children, which is why we have invested £65m in county lines specifically since November 2019 which has already seen more than 3,400 people arrested, more than 550 lines closed, drugs with a street value of £9m and £1.5m cash seized, and more than 770 vulnerable people safeguarded.“However we are aware that those at risk of exploitation need support to stop them getting drawn into county lines. This is why we are investing £230m in youth services and projects that give young people support and get them involved in positive activities.“The government is also improving the police response in areas worst affected by serious violence by investing £176.5m over the last two years through the serious violence fund. This includes violence reduction units, which bring together organisations across local communities to tackle violent crime and address its underlying causes, with a further £35.5m of funding just announced for the coming year.”On behalf of the Met, McNulty added: “Policing has, it’s well documented, lost a lot of police officers and staff over the last eight to nine years. But we’re in a different place now. I am getting more resources, more people, there’s been an announcement of an extra 20,000 officers – all of the work that we’ve been doing over the last year has come through extra government funding, [...] so we can have a dedicated response to county lines and I think that is making a difference.“Before – without the money – it was tough. Undoubtedly the funding we’ve received since November 2019 has helped.”As 20,000 is also the number of police officers lost across the UK to austerity during the last decade, Boris Johnson’s high-profile recruitment drive will only mean a return to 2010 levels.What’s more, Ahmed, from Minority Matters, said the police “failed” to properly utilise resources available to them in order to make Britain’s streets safe.“They refused to target the organised criminals that robbed our children of their future,” she said. “Families are more scared for their lives than ever and everyone is looking to find a safe place away from this havoc. Many refugee and migrant families regret seeking refuge in Britain.” Many refugee and migrant families regret seeking refuge in Britain.Aisha AhmedAhmed said the authorities should place greater focus on regulating and controlling drugs, offering rehabilitation and de-grooming for children and young people affected by drug trafficking. “The government should invest in better border controls, intelligence-led investigations and monitoring rogue employees that are enabling drugs to come through,” she added.“Children and young people aren’t even safe in prison. Our interventionist programmes don’t work and providers blame it on lack of engagement from the children’s part. Put yourselves in their shoes; would you have time to engage when you’re being trafficked from town to town, staying in a trap house or addict’s house, carrying drugs in your backside, starved and abused in the process and when police catch you, you’re instructed to take all the blame?”The UK government should look to the examples of other EU countries that have “better” youth detention facilities, interventions, training and education provisions, Ahmed said.“Just like Switzerland, our government and mayor can invest in having effective systems in place and bring together parents, government officials, community members, law enforcement and medical experts.“We don’t want drugs on our streets, nor do we want drug lords making millions on the backs of children and young people. If the government can’t crack down on the ones running the drugs trade, from smuggling to building up distribution networks using children and young people, then they should take full control of the trade under a public health issue policy.”* Names have been changed.Related...Revealed: Drug Gangs Are Stealing Children From Loving Families – Even In Lockdown‘Your Dealer Is Nearby’ – How Drugs Are Delivered To Your DoorstepExplained: What 'County Lines' Is And How It Works
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“I just want to get it over with.”I admit this thought had crossed my mind many times in 2020, ever since first watching the SARS-CoV-2 virus rapidly spreading in China. Before cases were even reported in the United States, I remember telling my husband that people weren’t paying attention. He may have thought I was being a little paranoid, but as someone with a chronic illness — who at the time was debating whether to start taking immunosuppressants — it felt important to keep an eye on it.That was over a year ago, and though a part of me had wanted to contract the coronavirus so I could hopefully get past it and treat my rheumatoid arthritis (which is not on the federal list of high-risk co-morbidities) without so much fear— nothing could have prepared me for the reality of experiencing “moderate” Covid-19 symptoms for myself. Some people may think that getting this virus is inevitable, and we’re all experiencing some major Covid-19 fatigue. In my rural community, I still regularly hear people proclaim that Covid-19 is a hoax or that it is “just the flu.”Many argue that they don’t need to follow safety protocols because this coronavirus “only affects those with preexisting conditions and the elderly” (as if they’re somehow expendable?). I hear people around me express more fear over the vaccine than of getting Covid-19. These attitudes are pervasive in Utah, where we’ve made headlines over conspiracy theorists storming hospitals, demanding access to ICUs; moms who follow a code not to test their children for Covid-19 in an effort to keep schools open; and anti-mask protests. Unsurprisingly, cases in Utah have soared, and our hospitals were at or near capacity for several weeks. "Battling Covid-19 was completely different than I had imagined because the symptoms were unlike anything I have ever experienced."  Though some people are blessed to have mild symptoms (or even be asymptomatic), so-called moderate symptoms of Covid-19 can still be terrifying and traumatic, and severe symptoms are an emergency. I have never thought that Covid-19 was like the flu and have done enough research for health articles I have written to know of the damage it can do to the body, including the incidents of organ damage, the risk of experiencing “long-hauler” symptoms and the growing body of evidence that the virus may cause psychosis in some individuals.  I’ve also had a lot of disease progression with my arthritis this past year without treatment, and my body has begun to show signs of permanent joint damage, which cannot be reversed. This is why a part of me has wanted to just “get it over with” in hope that it wouldn’t be severe for me. Ultimately, I hoped that were I to contract it, that Covid-19 would feel flu-like for me because I am in my 30s and not considered high risk. I was wrong.   Although I was careful and doing my best to follow safety guidelines, I contracted the coronavirus in mid-December. Battling Covid-19 was completely different than I had imagined because the symptoms were unlike anything I have ever experienced. Yes, there was a fever, a cough that felt deep and ominous, and extreme muscle aches and fatigue, but it was so much more than that... and it was nothing like the flu. What I didn’t expect, and nothing could have prepared me for, was the chest pain and pressure and the unrelenting feeling that I wasn’t getting enough oxygen. It made me feel like crawling out of my skin, like I was going mad. I could tell that my body was running on all cylinders, fighting an invader that was foreign and relentless. Sometimes I worried that my body was losing the battle. I feared going to sleep at night. What if I woke up gasping for breath or I didn’t wake up at all? Covid-19 isn’t just a physical disease, it can also cause a lot of anxiety. I was given a pamphlet when I got tested. It had a list of warning signs to watch out for, listing symptoms such as bluish lips or face, an inability to wake or stay awake. My lips weren’t blue, and I could take a deep breath, but I still felt like my body wasn’t getting enough oxygen. I couldn’t take more than a few steps without becoming extremely weak and dizzy, the world spinning around me. I was in that strange place of being very ill but maybe not quite sick enough to go to the hospital. I also didn’t know it at the time, but your body can be dangerously low on oxygen without experiencing classic signs, such as gasping for breath. I feared going to sleep at night. What if I woke up gasping for breath or I didn’t wake up at all?  Although a steroid I had on hand for rheumatoid arthritis helped ease my symptoms temporarily, the chest pressure and struggle for oxygen just kept coming back, and it made me wonder what kind of damage this constant onslaught of inflammation could be causing me internally.My body was fighting an all-out war, and although I could tell I was getting a little better each day, the stress of the battle on my immune system caused me to develop shingles about two weeks after testing positive for Covid-19. Shingles was miserable, but not nearly as scary as the coronavirus. We often hear about death rates pertaining to this virus, but that doesn’t tell the whole story. There are no guarantees with this virus, and there’s no way to know for sure how your body will react to it. This doesn’t mean that we should live in fear but rather that we should live with consideration of others, doing our best to protect the most vulnerable and ourselves from contracting this virus. Covid-19 should never be brushed off as being the flu or like any other illness that humans are familiar with. I am so very grateful to be alive, but I don’t feel completely “recovered.” To this day, eight weeks after receiving a positive test, I still can’t last on an elliptical machine more than 10 to 15 minutes without getting chest pain. My endurance has dropped dramatically. I struggle with lingering chest pain, shortness of breath, fatigue and other strange symptoms, such as dry mouth and insomnia. Unfortunately, with Covid, “recovered” does not always mean “returned to good health.” While our family was in quarantine, a child in our neighborhood wanted to play with our son, and she banged on the door relentlessly until my husband yelled through the other side that we have Covid-19. “Covid is bogus!” she yelled back. “No, it’s not!” my husband replied. It’s real, and for many people, it feels nothing like the flu. I learned this the hard way.  This article first appeared on HuffPost PersonalHave a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK PersonalI’m A Paramedic. I’ve Seen The Mental Health Toll This Pandemic Is Taking On Us AllI Help Covid Patients Learn To Smell Again. Here’s What I’ve SeenI’m Young And Disabled. Getting A Vaccine Shouldn’t Have Been This Hard
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A ruthless child-grooming gang flew a boy back to Britain so he could continue dealing drugs after his desperate parents sent him to Kenya for his own safety, HuffPost UK can reveal.Another grooming victim had to be held down by his mother and siblings as he tried to knife his innocent step-father, unrecognisable from the star pupil and keen footballer he had been a few years earlier.These are among dozens of horrifying stories from desperate families whose children have been threatened, attacked and ultimately trapped by county lines gangs with little hope of escape HuffPost UK has spent a year working with families through grassroots charity Minority Matters in north London to shed light on the devastating impact of these drug trafficking operations. We heard how the British gangs who have driven the trade in vulnerable young people for decades have devised even more sophisticated ways to continue their illegal activities during the pandemic.“Covid has made things worse for groomed and criminally exploited young people and children. More children have gone missing, been caught dealing drugs, not listening to their parents, getting hurt. Drug dealing has increased rather than decreased during this pandemic,” said Sadia Ali, co-founder of Minority Matters.Ali and her colleagues at the youth organisation told us councils and law enforcement across the UK are largely powerless to decondition young people who have been groomed.Children are taught how to get excluded from school and what to say to police, and many refuse help for fear their families will be attacked.Ali’s colleague Aisha Ahmed told HuffPost UK: “Exclusions and antisocial behaviour are signs of grooming. Children are told to act out as the first step towards eventually being sent to run county lines.”The goal is to “destroy any safety net that might prevent them from being criminally exploited”.“When children start showing negative behaviours, the system is set up to look into the home and parents as possible causes,” Ahmed said. “Groomers know that they’ll have free rein while schools and social services are investigating the parents.”Some end up doing jail time rather than expose their loved ones to harm, and others fall prey to knife crime – either as victims or perpetrators.The jaw-dropping tactics, witnessed again and again by the grassroots anti-gangs workers we spoke to, are used to recruit children to sell and transport drugs up and down the UK.While drug gangs running county lines operations are not new, they say police and social workers haven’t got to grips with the sophistication of the networks and the way they insulate themselves against intervention, a problem made worse by lockdown as the gangs adapt faster than the authorities can keep up.“School closures have had a huge impact,” said Ali. “For just a few hours children would be in a relatively safe environment but with the lockdown many parents have found out their children were getting calls then making excuses to break lockdown rules by going out to deliver drugs. It then became clear that these children are engaged in criminal activities.” I was pinning my own son down to the floor. He had a knife in his handGiselle Samuels*Often parents don’t have proof that their child has been entrapped in county lines activity until they are deeply caught up. There’s never any grand admission from their child about dealing drugs; clues could include seeing them picked up by unknown vehicles such as minicabs, disappearances, discovering train tickets to county areas in their room, and overhearing phone calls detailing drop-offs.Ali told us about the case of one boy whose parents sent him to Mombasa, where she thought he would be safe from the gang that had been exploiting him in London – only for the gang to wire him cash to return to the UK.The boy’s own family were too afraid for their own safety to speak to us directly, even on the condition of anonymity.“Money was sent to him to make his way back to the UK, with the embassy there issuing him a passport to return with. This was despite the parents’ objections,” Ali said.“Like many, he went from the airport to being missing.”Devastated mother Giselle Samuels* told HuffPost UK how her own son Patrick* was lured away from her – and how the nightmare came to a head when he launched a frenzied knife attack on her partner in the family home.“I was pinning my own son down to the floor,” she said. “He had a knife in his hand and, if I let go, I would’ve been stabbed. I still can’t get over the fact that this is how our lives have ended up.”Had Samuels not managed to overpower Patrick with the help of her two younger children, she believes her partner Andy would be dead. But she insists Patrick is a victim in this case too. He had been groomed by a county lines gang years earlier, changing the family forever.Young and vulnerable people are exploited as a direct result of drug prohibition, and exposed to high levels of exploitation, intimidation and violence, through the “county lines” drug supply phenomenon.How to run a county lines operation“County lines” works like this. Gangs from urban areas – often but not always London – set up a mobile number in a new area to sell drugs directly at street level. Potential customers ring the number and local runners are then dispatched to make deliveries. The “runners” are often children, typically boys aged 14 to 17, who are groomed with the promise of money, gifts and status, then deployed or coerced to carry out the illicit deals on a daily basis.Children and young people go missing, or “run away”, when their groomers send them to run the county lines. They are frequently used by gangs to expand inner city drugs operations into rural towns and are forced to work 24 hours, in a “trap house”, for weeks on end.These vulnerable youth are not allowed to leave, have to be on call, are discouraged from sleeping and, in some instances, don’t even get food. The missing episodes aren’t a choice – they have to go or they will get in trouble with their groomers.Children as young as 11 have been reported as being recruited by these highly organised networks.Nearly one in six children notified to the National Referral Mechanism – the system used to identify victims of modern slavery and human trafficking – as suspected victims of child criminal exploitation are girls. According to the Children’s Commissioner, some 46,000 children are involved in gang activity in England, and 4,000 teenagers in London alone are being exploited by county lines networks each year. However, Minority Matters thinks this number is much higher. Aisha Ahmed, the charity’s development manager, told HuffPost UK: “The way criminal exploitation of children is identified puts these children into the same statistics as modern day slavery victims from Eastern Europe and Vietnam who have been forced into prostitution, fruit picking, car-washing and drug farming. “It’s only recently that they’ve become a sub-category in the wider category of modern slaves. Even so, the numbers are hiding how widespread this issue is. Think of all of the youth drug offences which have been tried at court but were never linked to county line activities. Or knife crime, where perpetrators and victims’ activities point to the wider picture, but no one bothers to put together the pieces.”Patrick is just one example of a child who was groomed and exploited by a county lines gang.He was repeatedly arrested on drugs-related charges, sent to prison, and released after serving his sentence. Each time her son returned home from jail, his mother recognised him less and less.She said he didn’t seem to know what was or wasn’t reality any more. “On one occasion, my son basically said to me there’s only two options for him: to either be in prison or to kill himself – because he can’t see having the standard, normal life. The person I’m describing isn’t my son. I know him to be a loving caring person,” Samuels added.Patrick was 17 when his family started to notice changes in his behaviour. Patrick and his mother, especially, had always enjoyed a close relationship.But when his parents got divorced, Patrick became increasingly detached, erratic and rebellious. His mother assumed the marriage breakdown had hit him hard. With hindsight, however, she realises that he was being groomed by a county lines gang. No one in her family had ever been involved with drug dealing or breaking the law.At first, things weren’t too bad. Patrick and his siblings accepted their mother’s new partner warmly, while their own father continued to play an instrumental role in their lives.Then Patrick, who had been academically gifted and talented at sports, began refusing to attend college and skipping football practice. Worse still, he began to go missing – for long periods of time.“There’s a misconception [about] single parents, broken homes – that probably family members naturally engage in criminal activity which causes their children to face a heightened risk of being groomed. But we weren’t a broken family. My husband and I both worked, were homeowners, were educated and so were my kids. This is happening to kids from all different backgrounds.”A Children’s Society report entitled Counting Lives: Responding To Children Who Are Criminally Exploited highlights that young people affected by family breakdown and living in poverty may be deliberately targeted by grooming gangs. However, it also concludes that any child can be at risk of exploitation, and that anyone who wants to fit in, feel less alone or make money can be at risk.“There are definitely cases around young people from minority ethnic backgrounds being targeted more, particularly in areas like London, but there’s not one type,” added Patrick’s mother.“Though there’s a consensus that young Black men that are exclusively being groomed by county lines gangs, when you look at the issue more broadly, it’s not just Black kids. Young people who go missing and get caught up in county lines could be any child.”The leaders of county lines deliberately deploy white youth to transport drugs to certain areas because of a decreased likelihood of them being stopped and searched by police, HuffPost UK has heard.“It’s the ‘clear skin’ phenomenon,” explained London-based substance misuse worker Adam Johnson.“Remember: the most successful drug dealers just blend in, drive a brown Fiesta and live with their mum. A Black kid goes to certain areas, they’ll stand out and be targeted by the police. Hiding in plain sight is what you have to do and the line leaders know this so they’ll target white kids who are in care, white kids who are not known to the authorities and flagged as missing to the police for example, children who are displaced, people who can slip by undetected.”A similar phrase, “clean skin”, is at least two decades old, referring to drug dealers who are able to elude police attention. Both phrases more than hint at the racial disparity in the criminal justice system – something campaigners have been urging authorities to address for even longer still.But despite the fact grooming gangs target children of all ethnicities, Black young people are far more likely to be charged for possession rather than cautioned, to be taken to court, to be fined or imprisoned, and to get a criminal record than their white counterparts.  Three times as many Black people aged 21 and under are convicted of Class A drug supply than white people of the same age.Ahmed, from Minority Matters, said: “Our stance is that the only vulnerability that children have is the fact that they are children. However, in terms of Black and ethnic minority children, they come from communities usually disregarded by statutory bodies. They can be used as cannon fodder. “Even when they’re caught drug dealing at a young age, the police and government are less likely to see them as victims, do not do enough to look for the groomers, the people at the top of the illegal enterprise. “This links with the statistics of Black boys being more likely to be convicted than their white counterparts.”She added: “The system doesn’t take their abuse seriously.”Minicabs and mobile phonesLike many industries, drug trafficking relies on outsourcing.Just as drug chiefs need vulnerable children to do the dirty work of moving illegal substances around the country, they rely on workers from other sectors to provide services such as mobile phones and transport, without which they wouldn’t be able to run their business.Cheap “burner” phones can be bought from local corner shops and supermarkets without paperwork being exchanged and then discarded, making calls harder for authorities to track. Minicab firms that accept bookings over the phone make it easy to chauffeur drugs and their young carriers around the country without the attention that might be attracted by using public transport.Children as young as 12 have been known to embark on these journeys alone, for long distances and during school hours. These journeys are either paid for in cash or through rider accounts authenticated through stolen credit cards.In 2018, this prompted the government – in a collaboration with Crimestoppers – to produce posters advising private vehicle hire company managers to spot the signs of vulnerable young drug runners being forced to utilise their services. But even in lockdown, helpless parents tell HuffPost UK, it has made little difference. My son does not need to be on the street. He’s only on the street because he’s not safe where he was supposed to be “During lockdown some families have caught their children calling minicabs, getting inside and disappearing for hours and days at a time,” Minority Matters managing director Sadia Ali said.“Families would then call 101 to report their children missing and be on hold for up to an hour only to be told that there’s nothing the police can do. Day and night, parents hovered on the streets looking for their loved ones while there was no help in sight.”Larry Simpson*, a south London minicab office manager, told HuffPost UK how he had once flagged details of a suspected child drug trafficking incident with the police after a worrying message from one of his drivers.When the driver arrived to pick up a customer in Clapham one afternoon, he was shocked to see a 15-year-old girl jump in the vehicle and ask to be taken to Brighton and back. The youngster paid him £150 and the journey lasted an hour and a half each way.The incident happened in 2016 – before the Home Office got wind of the problem and rolled out its awareness campaign.“When my driver described how young the girl looked, that is when my suspicions were raised,” he said. “I contacted the police and handed over a record of the details of the drop-off address.“The gang groomers are very clever now. They realise that if the child is missing for a long time, the parents or somebody else will alert the police, therefore what they do is use them to sell drugs in the county areas and tell them to go home in the evening. This is also a new trend which the police are aware of.”He added: “Nowadays, drivers work for Uber and all of these other app-based cab companies, which makes this harder to detect.”Home Office minister Victoria Atkins has been in talks with groups such as Uber and the Licensed Private Hire Car Association to help drivers spot trafficked youngsters.An Uber spokesperson said: “We take a zero-tolerance approach to any illegal activity on our app. If we are made aware of any allegations of this nature we reserve the right to immediately terminate access to the app and we work closely with police authorities across the UK. We’re doing everything we can to help tackle dangerous county lines, and encourage drivers to call the police if they have any suspicions of assault or spot unexplained injuries.”Rural drug dealing networks use phone lines to set up deals. When a customer calls a number and requests drugs from a line leader, a runner is called on another number and dispatched to make the sale.As part of a national crackdown on county lines, senior police officers in June initiated talks with telecoms companies to shut down phones used for illegal drug sales automatically.The grassroots campaigners fighting for justiceMinority Matters is a grassroots charity run from a small office on the Andover Estate – a complex of high- and medium-rise council flats off the Seven Sisters Road in north London built in the 1970s.In the 10 years since it was founded, a stream of desperate parents of missing children – most of them women – have been through its doors near Finsbury Park station asking for help. Hundreds of concerned families have also taken part in the charity’s safeguarding events, fearing their children could be next.The charity was established to address the disconnect between ethnic minority communities and the statutory service providers, managing director Sadia Ali told HuffPost UK. It provides support for families of children who have been groomed by county lines, occasionally collaborating with local authorities, the police and the legal system.The estate and surrounding neighbourhoods have seen an increase in drug dealing and serious youth violence as a result of grooming. According to recent statistics drug offences were the only crime type that increased year-on-year in the borough of Islington between September 2019 to October 2020. These offences saw a 22% increase during this period. Ali and Ahmed now estimate that up to 70% of Islington’s Somali community have extended family affected directly or indirectly by county lines and drug dealing.The local council led a group of local authorities lobbying central government and the Home Office to take action at a national level in 2017. Its integrated gangs team (IGT) includes police, health workers and charities, and was praised for helping bring down knife crime at a time when it was rising everywhere else in London.But Minority Matters contacted HuffPost UK in early 2020 because Ali and Ahmed didn’t feel the authorities – chiefly the criminal justice system, but also local social and children’s services – were doing enough. And it’s clear from the heartbreaking experiences of the women we spoke to that children in Islington and beyond still aren’t safe from groomers.Ali told us: “We provide vital support to parents from ethnic minorities whose children are being criminally exploited and groomed for county lines. We bridge the gap between the families and local authorities in accessing the help they need.“In doing this, we also try to encourage statutory bodies to tailor their services to match the needs on the ground.”It is a myth that poor parenting is to blame for kids being groomed, says Ali. She adds there is little people can do to keep their kids safe until police smash the drug gangs themselves.At first, children like Samuels’ son Patrick may misbehave at school and start coming home later and later. Eventually they go missing for longer periods of time and get kicked out of school.They may get caught committing petty crime. Later, they become either the victim or the perpetrator of knife crime, and end up behind bars or released into inadequate rehabilitation programmes, where they meet more experienced criminals.In either case, they are told to continue trafficking drugs once they are released – and they know their families could be at risk if they try to break free. His father is a shopkeeper and offered him £200 a week to work for him. My son replied that he doesn’t need that as he’s making more money More mothers from the area told HuffPost UK how their sons fell prey to the gangs. One typical case went like this: a 15-year-old boy went missing for four days, and his mother embarked on a frantic search to track him down. It was completely out of character – he’d never done this before. The woman printed his photograph on missing posters and plastered them all over their north London neighbourhood.While speaking to his friends, she learned that he had been groomed in his school playground by a local gang, had a street name, and was selling drugs after school while claiming he had gone to play football.“My son was one of a few of the young people to be recruited, I found out. By that time he was in it for almost a year and a half,” the woman explained. Her son was picked up by Metropolitan Police officers multiple times in Norfolk – almost 100 miles away from the family home.Another woman, Carol Smith*, described how her son was targeted by a grooming gang at the age of 16 and eventually imprisoned for drug dealing charges.“My son is now 21 years old, on remand, and It’s now reached a point where he doesn’t want to go to university or work,” she told HuffPost UK. “He’s been to prison twice, served his sentences and was released. All this time the disappearances were consistent. I have two older daughters – a teacher and optician. This was never an issue with them.“His father, my husband, is a shopkeeper and offered him £200 a week to work for him. My son replied that he doesn’t need that as he’s making more money. When we asked to see the money, my son said: ‘Someone is keeping it for me.’ Which sensible drug dealer who hasn’t been groomed and knows exactly what they’re doing would give his profit to someone to keep?”Grooming gangs employ a wide range of grooming techniques to entrap vulnerable children ranging from plying them with free food in chicken shops to lingering outside school gates and instructing young recruits to engage their own peers in the same activities.Numerous official reports and campaigners detail how gang leaders target excluded truants and students who have been left to languish in pupil referral units. It is a known tactic for gangs to target young people in places where they are supposed to be safe.So-called chicken shop grooming was described in written evidence submitted to the youth select committee, which is investigating the UK’s knife crime crisis, last year. They tell us concerned parents that the problem is complex but it’s their job to gather intelligence and take action. Why do we still see drug dealers in our communities on every corner?Patricia*But inner city community members and youth workers had long been aware of this grooming tactic. A month before the youth select committee heard this evidence, London Grid For Learning – a community of schools and local authorities in the capital – rolled out its “there’s no such thing as free chicken” poster campaign to highlight the dangers of chicken-shop grooming.The youth justice board of England and Wales also reported that some young people said their peers had been targeted by gangs hanging around outside pupil referral units (PRUs) and outside sports centres – claims echoed by many of the parents Ali has supported.Labour’s shadow youth justice secretary Peter Kyle told HuffPost UK: “For all the talk of national crackdowns, the Conservatives have failed to protect child victims and to stop them being exploited by criminal gangs. We need tough, strategic and urgent action to help the victims of child criminal exploitation.”One mother, Patricia*, told HuffPost UK how her son Adam* – who attended a private school – was groomed at the age of 13. As is commonplace, he would go missing for long spells and was once away for a month and 10 days before being discovered in Whitechapel. No social services or police visited Patricia’s in that time despite her reports, she said. Adam was stabbed in 2017 over a drugs dispute but refused to tell anyone who was responsible. It is not uncommon for physical violence and knife attacks to be carried out on the orders of groomers as  a form of punishment, and warning to other children within their networks. It is not always perpetrated by competitors or other gangs.Having physically recovered from his injuries, Adam remained mentally scarred and fearful for his life. One day he left home armed with a machete for protection and was arrested by the police following a stop-and-search. Adam spent six weeks in Belmarsh Prison.The 20-year-old is now too afraid to go outside in case he’s stabbed again and unable to protect himself. “The police will launch an entire operation, sometimes shut down areas, to apprehend a young drug dealer, but have difficulties rooting out the leaders of the county line gangs,” Patricia said. “They tell us concerned parents that the problem is complex but it’s their job to gather intelligence and take action. Why do we still see drug dealers in our communities on every corner?”It isn’t uncommon for many children involved in gangs to commit crimes themselves – but sometimes they aren’t seen as victims by adults and professionals, despite the harm they have experienced, the NSPCC said.“The children going through this, seeing the desperation in their eyes means they’re either going to die on the streets or kill somebody on the streets,” added Ali.One mother added: “My son does not need to be on the street. He’s only on the street because he’s not safe where he was supposed to be.“Let’s not beat around the bush: the root cause is the drugs. Something needs to be done about the drugs – and also to get rehabilitation for them.” Substance misuse worker Adam Johnson believes police are reluctant to arrest gang leaders because it can unleash a “wave of violence” in the lower ranks.“The cops know what’s going on and where the dealers are – but don’t want to take them out,” he said.“If they take them the top out, all of his lieutenants stab and shoot each other to fill that vacancy. It creates a wave of violence and you’d rather live with equilibrium because at least you know what’s going on.”But this has dire consequences, Johnson said. “The thing is the kids get pulled into the gangs and once that happens they get written off.  Boris Johnson and co don’t create a system to do social mobility. No, they want people on the estate to stay on the estate. And once you have a drug conviction then getting a job is a nightmare. So what else do you have left?”* Names have been changed to protect sources
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