Santa Cruz Biotechnology had been facing a variety of animal welfare charges related to lapses in the care of the research animals it kept.Santa Cruz Biotechnology creates antibodies to specific proteins, which researchers then purchase in order to isolate and identify those proteins.After some initial inspections suggested that Santa Cruz was keeping some animals alive after the point that they should be euthanized due to things like tumors, further searches revealed that the company was being generally shifty about its animal records keeping."By losing its research registration this month, SCBT will not be able to extract blood from animals covered under the Animal Welfare Act," an Animal Welfare Institute spokesman told Ars.The company can still use other sources of antibodies, such as mice, rats, and chickens.But goats and rabbits can often produce far more material over the course of their lives than other species, and their antibodies are useful in some contexts where those from mice are not.
No, even the EU review of Google's methods are not final. Now the Internet giant's anonnseringstjänst Adwords to attract the attention of the European Commission's interest. Not only do we say that the EU is about to impose a record fine - three billion euros, equivalent to 28 billion - because Google is considered to favor its own price comparison service. There are also ongoing competition investigation of the software in Android and now a third investigation be underway. This time it's advertising service Adwords, reported Reuters writes that competitors Goolgle have been asked to share information about how the information related to search advertising in the Internet giant. Something as interpreted by the European Commission is now ready to hit with new allegations that Google violates competition law.
No, even the EU review of Google's methods are not final. Now the Internet giant's anonnseringstjänst Adwords to attract the attention of the European Commission's interest. Not only do we say that the EU is about to impose a record fine - three billion euros, equivalent to 28 billion - because Google is considered to favor its own price comparison service. There are also ongoing competition investigation of the software in Android and now a third investigation be underway. This time it's advertising service Adwords, reported Reuters writes that competitors Goolgle have been asked to share information about how the information related to search advertising in the Internet giant. Something as interpreted by the European Commission is now ready to hit with new allegations that Google violates competition law.
The company's tax arrangements is questioned in several countries, which can lead to heavy fines. The Telegraph reported in May that the European Commission was expected to hit with record fine for Google to have abused his power by systematically favoring its own price comparison service Google shopping at the expense of similar competing services. Yesterday, the European Commission's draft. It is aimed not only in on Google shopping, but can also attack against Google's key business ad in the Ad Sense - the third-party tool that enables Web sites around the world can implement Google ads on a portion of the revenue. Google has developed many innovative products that have made a difference in our lives. But it does not give Google the right to prevent other companies from the chance to compete and innovate, says EU Commissioner Margrethe Vestager in a written statement.
UK telecoms firm TalkTalk has been fined a record £400,000 for poor data security which led to the theft of the personal data of nearly 157,000 customers.The cyber attack on its website took place in October last year.The Information Commissioner, which imposed the fine, said the firm's security was so poor that the attack succeeded "with ease".In nearly 16,000 cases, the attacker was able to steal bank account details.The Information Commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, said: "TalkTalk's failure to implement the most basic cyber security measures allowed hackers to penetrate TalkTalk's systems with ease.""Yes hacking is wrong, but that is not an excuse for companies to abdicate their security obligations.
The fine is the biggest ever levied by the Information CommissionerThe UK s data watchdog has fined TalkTalk a record £400,000 over last year s cyber attack on the company in which the personal details of thousands of customers were exposed.The attack last October breached the accounts of 157,000 customers to steal data that included credit cards, bank account numbers, names and phone numbers.On Wednesday, the Information Commissioner s Office said TalkTalk had failed when it came to the basic principles of cyber security , and found it to be in breach of the Data Protection Act.The fine is the biggest the ICO has ever laid down, moving close to the maximum £500,000 penalty it can order, and comes just months after the new Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham took the post.TalkTalk s failure to implement the most basic cyber security measures allowed hackers to penetrate TalkTalk s systems with ease, she said.
Telecoms company TalkTalk has been fined £400,000 over website security failings which led to the theft of almost 157,000 customer's data last year.The cyber attack took place last October, with bank account details stolen in almost 16,000 instances.The Information Commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, said the company's online security was so lacklustre, the hackers gained access to customer information 'with ease'.After her office imposed the record fine, Denham said: "TalkTalk's failure to implement the most basic cyber security measures allowed hackers to penetrate TalkTalk's systems with ease.""Yes hacking is wrong, but that is not an excuse for companies to abdicate their security obligations."TalkTalk should and could have done more to safeguard its customer information.
TalkTalk has been handed a record £400,000 fine for security failings over a cyber attack which allowed customer data to be accessed with ease , a watchdog has announced.The Information Commissioner s Office ICO said the attack last October could have been prevented if TalkTalk had taken basic steps to protect customers information.Personal data of 156,959 customers including names, addresses, dates of birth, phone numbers and email addresses was said to have been accessed.According to the ICO investigation, the attack took advantage of technical weaknesses in TalkTalk s systems to exploit it and access personal data.Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said: TalkTalk s failure to implement the most basic cyber security measures allowed hackers to penetrate TalkTalk s systems with ease.Yes hacking is wrong, but that is not an excuse for companies to abdicate their security obligations.
An EU High Court Advocate General has recommended a review of the case that saw Intel slapped with a record fine after it was found to have coerced OEMs to avoid using rival companies' x86 CPUs.Back in 2009, the EC imposed a €1.06bn penalty - 4.15 per cent of Intel's turnover - following a multi-year legal battle but Chipzilla has since twice appealed for the decision to be quashed.An opinion offered by the Advocate General, Nils Wahl, has offered encouragement to Intel's legal eagles; Wahl said a ruling by the EU's General Court — which dismissed Intel's first appeal — was flawed and needed to be sent back to the General Court for review.Wahl's non-binding opinion stressed the dismissal of Intel's appeal was delivered on iffy legal ground, and that the EU's General Court should have another look at the decision because it had overstated the degree to which Intel's rebates to OEMs had distorted the market.Additionally, Wahl noted that Intel's actual agreements with HP and Lenovo – two of the OEMs which Intel had awarded the conditional rebated Dell and NEC were the others – did not prevent those companies from purchasing plentiful amounts of x86 processors from rival manufacturers such as AMD, which brought the initial complaint.He added that Intel's market share was contracting towards the end of the ten year period that the General Court looked at, and that in 2007 it simply did not have enough market share for its activities to lessen competition.
Vodafone has been hit by a giant £4.6 million fine for "mis-selling, inaccurate billing and poor complaints handling procedures".Ofcom, the UK's communications regulator, has hit the firm with the fine following two investigations into the treatment of pay-as-you go customers who had not had their accounts credited after they had topped up."Vodafone also failed to act quickly enough to identify or address these problems, which stemmed from the company transferring to a new billing system," the regulator said in a statement.In total, Ofcom fined the telecoms giant £4,625,000 – a record fine.This was broken down into two sections; a larger £3,700,000 for taking pay-as-you-go customer money and not providing them with a service and a secondary £925,000 for the problems with its complaints.The London-based company has admitted there were "failures" and apologised to the people who were affected.
US pharma giant Pfizer and a partnering distributor have been slapped with a record fine for hiking UK drug prices by 2,600% overnight.In September 2012, the amount the National Health Service NHS was charged for 100mg packs of anti-epilepsy drug phenytoin sodium went from £2.83 to £67.50 $3.56 to $84.98 , according to the UK's Competition and Markets Authority CMA .The CMA has ordered the two companies involved, the US pharma giant Pfizer and UK-based distributor Flynn Pharma, to pay record fines of £84.2 million $106.01M and £5.2 million $6.55M respectively, and to reduce their prices for phenytoin sodium.Both have said that they will be taking legal action to overturn the decision.Before September 2012, Pfizer sold the drug in capsule form to UK wholesalers and pharmacies under the brand name Epanutin, and the prices of the drug were regulated.That month, Pfizer sold the UK distribution rights for Epanutin to Flynn Pharma, which "de-branded" the drug.
Apple is accusing Qualcomm of violating competition laws, extortion, prisfixering, and to have withheld payments on nine billion.Qualcomm has been in substantial question.a few days ago sued the us federal trade FTC the company, for the use of their monopoly status in communication technology to fix the prices and put the market forces out of play.During Friday when Apple filed a lawsuit against Qualcomm, in which the company lined up several allegations, reports Appleinsider.According to Apple's Qualcomm withheld payments of about nine billion as revenge for that Apple cooperated with the south Korean competition authority, KFTC, in a survey in december led to a record fine of almost eight billion.Qualcomm shall, in addition, have tried their hand at blackmail by asking Apple to provide false information to the KFTC.
ZTE Corp has reported its first annual loss since 2012, after China’s largest listed telecommunications equipment supplier set aside money for a record fine to the United States government as settlement for violating trade sanctions against Iran and North Korea.The company lost 2.36 billion yuan (US$342 million) in 2016, compared with a profit of 3.21 billion yuan in 2015.It made a provision for losses of US$892 million in the 12 months ended December 31In a regulatory filing on Wednesday, ZTE chairman and president Zhao Xianming said the company made a provision for losses of US$892 million in the 12 months ended December 31 related to the penalty it expected to incur from a settlement with the US government.Shares in the Shenzhen-based company jumped as much as 8.9 per cent to HK$13.28 in Hong Kong, their biggest intraday advance in 19 months, before easing back to close up 6.07 per cent to HK$12.94.Trading in its shares in Shenzhen was halted for the announcement of the settlement.
Global telecommunications company Telefónica rethought the way it looked at IT security after the cyberattack that hit UK telecommunications provider TalkTalk back in October 2015, according to Telefónica’s global chief information officer (CIO), Phil Jordan.The data breach exposed the personal details of more than 150,000 customers and led to a record fine in the UK of £400,000 ($486,720) by the UK’s data watchdog, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).TalkTalk, which provides pay TV, internet access and mobile network services to enterprises and consumers in the UK revealed the attack led to the loss of more than 100,000 customers and cost more than forty million pounds ($49M) to repair.Telefónica, which also trades as O2 in the UK, Vivo in Brazil and Movistar in South America and Spain, is one of the largest telecoms companies in the world.So when another telecommunications company like TalkTalk was hit by a cyberattack, it made Telefónica revisit how it dealt with information security.“There’s no doubt [that the TalkTalk data breach] caught everybody’s attention and it raised awareness – particularly in the UK and in our UK brand O2,” says Jordan.
ZTE Corp, China’s largest listed telecommunications equipment supplier, has appointed a new chairman, just days after it agreed to pay a record fine to the United States government for violating long-standing trade sanctions on Iran and North Korea.Shenzhen-based ZTE named veteran company executive Yin Yimin as its new chairman to replace Zhao Xianming, who resigned on Tuesday to focus on day-to-day operations in his other role as president.In its regulatory filing after the market closed, the company said that Zhao gave up his chairman’s title “to enhance corporate governance” by separating that position from the chief executive’s role.It pointed out that Zhao “has no disagreement with the [ZTE] board and there is no other matter required to be brought to the attention of the shareholders”.“Provided that it does not make any further mistakes, ZTE is now in a position where it can once again look to the US market for expansion,” Paul Haswell, a partner at international law firm Pinsent Masons, told the South China Morning Post.Zhao was appointed as ZTE’s chairman and president in April last year as part of a sweeping senior management revamp, after the company was slapped with export restrictions by the US government.
p /p p Automated cold calls are one of the banes of modern life — and they can also be illegal./p p A UK regulator has hit a company responsible for almost 100 million "nuisance calls" with a record fine of £400,000./p p The Information Commissioner's Office announced on Wednesday that it was handing down the fine to a firm called Keurboom
p Facebook must pay a €110 million (US$123 million) for misleading the European Commission during an investigation of its takeover of WhatsApp.The fine is for telling the Commission it would not be possible to reliably match Facebook and WhatsApp accounts for the same user -- something that would allow the company to better target advertising across the two platforms.The move shows that enterprises need to be up front with regulators about their ability to process users' personal information, and not try to play it down -- especially when making acquisitions."Today's decision sends a clear signal to companies that they must comply with all aspects of EU merger rules, including the obligation to provide correct information," said European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager.She described the fine -- for hiding the company's hypothetical ability to match up users' activity on Facebook.com with their behavior elsewhere on line -- as "proportionate".However, it's 700 times greater than the record fine imposed by the French data protection authority, CNIL, earlier this week for actual breaches of privacy law involving such activity matching.
Adding to the embattled ride-hailing company's troubles, Uber is now reportedly under investigation for privacy violations by the Federal Trade Commission.It isn't clear exactly what has the FTC investigators interested in Uber, which was reported earlier today by Recode.The site speculates that it could be the employees' use of "god view," a tool that was used by some Uber employees to track the locations of some politicians and celebrities.That would be in keeping with a trend at the FTC, which has been paying more attention to the privacy practices of tech companies in recent years.Google reached an agreement with the FTC in 2012 related to undisclosed tracking in Safari, in which the company agreed to pay $22.5 million, a record fine.In 2011, Facebook agreed to 20 years of privacy audits after the FTC alleged the company hadn't followed its own privacy policies.
BRUSSELS—The European Union’s antitrust watchdog in the coming weeks is set to hit Alphabet Inc.’s Google with a record fine for manipulating its search results to favor its own comparison-shopping service, according to people familiar with the matter.The penalty against Google is expected to top the EU’s previous record fine levied on a...
The European Union has three antitrust investigations into Google’s business practices, including search, Android, and its advertising business.One of them is soon going to come to an end, and Google is facing a record fine in the case, which is expected to top EU’s €1.06 billion ruling against Intel from a few years ago.Google’s fine could go up to 10% of its yearly revenue, which topped $90.27 billion last year, The Wall Street Journal reports.A decision should be announced in the coming weeks, although Google can still appeal it.In addition to paying the fine Google would likely have to make various changes to its search business in Europe.The EU started investigating Google’s allegedly abusive search practices in the region all the way back in 2010 and tried to settle the case a few times in the past few years, seeking various concessions from the search giant.
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