Fifty years later, to the day, I did this moon landing virtual reality thing at San Diego Comic-Con.Which feat is more impressive?I don't know, I'm not a scientist.The firm, which is based in both Beijing and Miami, set up a VR simulation that lets people feel like they are on a lunar mission.You can fiddle with controls and pull levers.While walking down narrow hallways of docking bays and moving up and down on elevators, the sense of motion feels realistic.
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DC Comics' own group of misfit superheroes in Doom Patrol might not get the adoration they deserve from the public, but they have their own live-action show on the DC Universe streaming service and it's just been renewed for a second season.The show's renewal was announced Saturday night during the DC Universe panel at San Diego Comic-Con 2019.Doom Patrol is a reimagining of superhero outcasts Robotman (played by Brendan Fraser), Negative Man (Matt Bomer), Elasti-Woman (April Bowlby) and Crazy Jane (Diane Guerrero), who are led by scientist Dr. Niles Caulder, also known as the Chief (Timothy Dalton).In the series, the Doom Patrol members suffered horrible accidents that gave them superhuman abilities but left them physically and emotionally scarred.But this team of heroes found their purpose through the Chief, who brought them together to investigate weird threats against humanity.Following the mysterious disappearance of the Chief, the heroes find themselves called to action by Cyborg (Joivan Wade), who comes to them with a special mission.
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Fifty years later, to the day, I did this moon landing virtual reality thing at San Diego Comic Con.Which feat is more impressive?I don't know, I'm not a scientist.The firm, which is based in both Beijing and Miami, set up a VR simulation that lets people feel like they are on a lunar mission.You can fiddle with controls and pull levers.While walking down narrow hallways of docking bays and moving up and down on elevators, the sense of motion feels realistic.
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A tiny shark discovered in the Gulf of Mexico with mysterious pouches near its front fins has turned out to be a new species, scientists say.The fittingly named American pocket shark, or Mollisquama mississippiensis, uses the pouches to squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean.It's only the third shark species out of more than 500 that may squirt luminous liquid, according to R. Dean Grubbs, a Florida State University scientist who was not involved in the research.The other two are the previously known pocket shark and the taillight shark, which has a similar gland near its tail."You have this tiny little bulbous luminescent shark cruising around in the world’s oceans and we know nothing about them," Grubbs told The Associated Press."It shows us how little we actually know."
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One of the best surprises to come out of this new era of “All Trek, All the Time” has been Short Treks, the anthology series that gives us bite-sized, varied bits of storytelling from across the Star Trek universe.At Comic-Con, we got to see what to expect from a very animated second batch of adventures for the series.There will be six new Short Treks, each telling a smaller story within the larger Trek universe, at least one of which will feature Tribbles, the most adorable menace Starfleet has ever faced.Another will feature Spock and Discovery’s Number One stuck in an elevator, while yet another will act as a sort of teaser for the upcoming Star Trek: Picard, offering a sense of the hero’s history leading from Nemesis to the new series, fifteen years after his latest canon appearance.Two of the shorts will be animated, and three will feature the Discovery-era Enterprise crew, and then there’s the Picard short rounding out the bunch.In the trailer shown at the Comic-Con Star Trek panel, we got glimpses of a lot of these shorts, with humorous Spock and Number One interludes, Captain Pike apparently in prison, and H Jon Benjamin playing a hysterical, tribble-studying scientist.
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Much of the planet is on a heat bender, including the northernmost inhabited place on Earth.Alert, Canada (yes, that is it's name) cracked 21 degrees Celsius for the first time ever recorded this week.“It’s really quite spectacular,” David Phillips, Environment Canada’s chief climatologist, said in a typical scientist understatement according to the Canada’s Global News.While “spectacular” is one word to describe the heat, disturbing is the one I would choose.Alert is a small military base on an island in northern Canada.The average high temperature for July is around 6 degrees Celsius while lows usually bottom out around -25, according to Environment Canada data.
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Children of the '80s, rejoice.The realm of Thra is returning to life as Netflix's The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance unveiled its mystical wares at a Saturday Hall H panel at San Diego Comic-Con 2019.Netflix tweeted it was going full "behind the scenes" at SDCC, along with another look at the trailer.Age of Resistance is set 1,000 years before the action in the original 1982 Jim Henson and Frank Oz muppet fantasy movie.The prequel will touch on a lot of familiar characters, including the wise and grumpy Aughra, a fluffy Fizzgig, Landstriders, Skeksis and Mystics.Mark Hamill, who voiced Chucky in the 2019 remake, plays a scientist who uses the Dark Crystal for experiments.
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The results of this work have been published in the Science Advances journal.Contemporary science, medicine, engineering and information technology demand efficient processing of data - still images, sound and radio signals, as well as information coming from different sensors and cameras.Since the 1970s, this has been achieved by means of the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm (FFT).The FFT makes it possible to efficiently compress and transmit data, store pictures, broadcast digital TV, and talk over a mobile phone.Without this algorithm, medical imaging systems based on magnetic resonance or ultrasound would not have been developed.As the quantum computer processes simultaneously all possible values (so-called "superpositions") of input data, the number of operations decreases considerably.
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Climate change can cause dramatic shifts in global temperatures and weather patterns.While scientists won't be able to reverse all of the negative impacts of these changes, they are looking for ways to lessen the effects by controlling the weather.Cloud seeding is the process of adding particles to clouds to force them to rain or snow.Another possible technique that China is exploring is using winds to naturally transport the silver iodide into the clouds.Silver iodide has a very similar structure to ice, so the ice crystals in the cloud will bond to it, making the cloud increasingly heavy until it releases its moisture as rain or snow.The process is called stratospheric aerosol injection.
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It is Captain Kathryn Janeway, Pirate Queen of the Quadrant.She is not the Janeway you know, a tiny scientist cast-off to a faraway galaxy and slowly driven insane by the task set before her: Trying to unite her crew and make her way home.She’s the Janeway of the Mirror Universe, and she may or may not have two all-metal arms.IDW announced today at San Diego Comic-Con a new single-issue story titled Mirrors and Smoke, set in Star Trek’s Mirror Universe, and centred on the mirror version of Janeway and her crew.It comes in the wake of the prior Mirror Universe series, Mirror Broken and Terra Incognita, which not only introduced us to Mirror Universe versions of the Next Generation cast, but most importantly, gifted us Buff Picard.The press release describes Mirrors and Smoke as a fun adventure, that sounds like something I may have written for a Janeway/Seven fanfic archive in 2008 (only with less Neelix).
After several years of theorizing and experimenting, an international team of researchers including scientists at Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has finally succeeded in measuring how heat passes between two gold electrodes through a single molecule.They report their findings in Nature on July 17, 2019.Around 2000, scientists first measured how electrons flow through single molecules.But quantifying the heat transfer, or thermal conductance, at the molecular scale remained a persistent challenge because of the high measurement resolution required.To achieve this elusive goal, the international team of collaborators had to work on both an experimental and a theoretical level.Scientists at University of Michigan developed a setup called a scanning thermal microscope, which positions a single alkane molecule between a gold-coated probe and a gold layer.
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Scientists have come up with a sneaky way of getting people to go outside this summer, and are asking for help from the public to help count butterflies again – only this time it's for a more ominous reason.The butterflies are prepping an invasion.Naturalists suspect we're due a painted lady B-Day mass landing this summer, that could see as many as 10m of the little flappers arrive in the country.It's part of a bizarre migration stopover that happens once every decade or so, with the last one in 2008 seeing approximately 11 million painted ladies land to do whatever it is they can only do on UK soil.Eat a steak and kidney pie out of a tin.Put fish fingers in a sandwich.
Magnets are widely used today for all sorts of scenarios from medical devices to storing data inside computers.The thing that magnets have in common is that they are made of solid material.Researchers say that the new liquid magnets could lead to printable liquid devices for multiple applications from targeting cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings.The team has created a material that is liquid and magnetic of a sort that hasn’t been observed before, according to researcher Tom Russell.Russell is the head of a program called Adaptive Interfacial Assemblies Towards Structuring Liquids.Russell and lead author for the study, Xubo Liu, came up with the idea of forming liquid structures from ferrofluids.
If they collapse, global sea levels could rise by more than 10 feet (3.3 meters), swamping coastal cities like New York, Shanghai, and Calcutta.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Antarctica is losing ice faster than ever in recorded history.If these glaciers — the Pine Island and the Thwaites — destabilize, that could lead sea levels to rise by up to 10.8 feet (3.3 meters)."It's not really a suggestion on our part — we as scientists have to put out all possibilities to counter the problem ahead so that society can decide which to act on," he said.Levermann's team calculated that, to stop that destabilizing melting process, they would have to add 7.4 trillion tons of snow — at least — to a Costa-Rica sized section of the glaciers over a decade.
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Researchers therefore try to use materials that have more or less of a consistent effect on people – be it positive or negative.According to this theory, it’s the attention paid during the initial encoding of information that helps people more easily retrieve it later on.It’s easier to recall a mildly exciting experience if it is followed by a period of quiet than if it is followed by a highly arousing event.It is easier to recall winning a school competition when we are back at the same school for a reunion, for example.We started off by examining the information processing steps that take place in the human brain when we encode, retain and retrieve neutral information.Here we relied on an existing, established theory of memory recall which is particularly clear and precise because it expresses every one of its claims in mathematical equations.
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Chinese scientists have achieved a series of breakthroughs in stealth materials technology that they claim can make fighter jets and other weaponry lighter and cheaper to build and less vulnerable to radar detection.Professor Luo Xiangang and colleagues at the Institute of Optics and Electronics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Chengdu, Sichuan province said they had created the world’s first mathematical model to precisely describe the behavior of electromagnetic waves when they strike a piece of metal engraved with microscopic patterns, according to a statement posted on the academy’s website on Monday.With their new model and breakthroughs in materials fabrication, they developed a membrane, known as a meta-surface, that can absorb radar waves in the widest spectrum yet reported.At present, stealth aircraft mainly rely on special geometry – their body shape – to deflect radar signals, but those designs can affect aerodynamic performance.They also use radar-absorbing paint, which has a high density but only works against a limited frequency spectrum.In one test, the new technology cut the strength of a reflected radar signal – measured in decibels – by between 10 and nearly 30 decibels in a frequency range of 0.3 to 40 gigahertz.
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Officials with NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) have settled on which orbit will be used for the future lunar Gateway outpost, the agencies have announced.After considering different orbit options, scientists have settled on the near-rectilinear halo orbit (NRHO), which is described as an ‘eccentric’ route around the Moon, one that brings it close to the lunar surface at one point and far away at the other.The Apollo mission orbited the Moon in a low lunar orbit, but the Gateway — a permanent human outpost and a new space milestone for humanity — will orbit the celestial body in an ‘angelic halo’ orbit, a description referencing the orbit’s halo-like appearance from Earth.When the Gateway is at the closest point of its orbit, the outpost will be only around 1,800 miles from the Moon’s surface.At its farthest distance, the Gateway will be nearly 43,500 miles away.The ESA has published a simulation showing what this orbit will look like once the Gateway is in space.
Inventors of centuries past and scientists of today have found ingenious ways to make our lives better with magnets - from the magnetic needle on a compass to magnetic data storage devices and even MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) body scan machines.All of these technologies rely on magnets made from solid materials.Jam sessions: making magnets out of liquidsFor the past seven years, Russell, who leads a program called Adaptive Interfacial Assemblies Towards Structuring Liquids in Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division, has focused on developing a new class of materials - 3D-printable all-liquid structures.One day, Russell and the current study's first author Xubo Liu came up with the idea of forming liquid structures from ferrofluids, solutions of iron-oxide particles that become strongly magnetic, but only in the presence of another magnet."We wondered, if a ferrofluid can become temporarily magnetic, what could we do to make it permanently magnetic, and behave like a solid magnet but still look and feel like a liquid?"
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- Conventional magnets are hard and rigid but have made great contributions to society and to modern industry, says materials scientist Thomas Russell of the University of Massachusetts Amherst.But this award-winning innovator dreamed of more - what if magnets could be soft, flowable as liquid and malleable to conform to a limited space?In an article in this week's Science, he and first author Xubo Liu from Beijing University of Chemical Technology, with others at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley, report on a simple way they developed to transform paramagnetic ferrofluids - plain metal particles in suspension - into a magnetic state.The new ferromagnetic liquid droplets "represent a milestone for the further development of magnetic materials," Russell says.This means that by applying an external magnetic field, scientists can control liquid devices made this way, like waving Harry Potter's wand, he suggests, "which opens promising research and application areas such as liquid actuators, liquid robotics and active-matter delivery."As the polymer scientist explains, he, Liu and the team used iron oxide nanoparticles in a special oil-polymer mixture to transform paramagnetic ferrofluid into the ferromagnetic state at room temperature.
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The fact that no one has died from being struck by dark matter is enough proof to rule out certain ideas about the mysterious stuff, according to one new theory paper.There’s a conundrum facing physicists: Most of the universe’s mass appears to be missing, based on observations of the universe’s structure, how galaxies move, and how they seem to warp distant light.Thousands of physicists are now hunting for what might be producing these effects.But the mere fact that we’re alive here on Earth can offer some insight as to what dark matter isn’t, and the researchers behind the new paper say the human body itself can serve as a dark matter detector.There are plenty of dark matter candidates, most of which have something in common: They feel the force of gravity, but do not interact the other physical forces, like electromagnetism.That means that, rather than “dark,” it’s better to think of it as “invisible” or “transparent.” Scientists have spent a lot of time and effort building detectors in order to find this dark matter.
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