Gusten Danielsson, Head of Finance Cellink receives the winner's diploma. The company sells both 3D printer biological material but also a product that they call biobläck, therefore, the material used to print human tissue. Business Angel Lena Apler, which we also wrote about earlier this week, chose to cast their votes elsewhere, namely the company My Services. It is extremely exciting medtech but I'm a bit crass, and more short-term in my thinking. My services have a model that I understand better and there is less risk, she said. Moreover, we have a product that we know works, says Gusten Danielsson, Head of Finance Cellink when Breakit talk to him afterwards.
Workout regimens are also longer-term commitments that don t produce results overnight, so how does hitting the body with a splash of cold manage to do the same thing?This leaves a vacuum of heat that leads to cold.The body doesn t have to be at freezing levels to get the effect in the tissue because the brain will already be activated between 41 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit 5-15 degrees Celsius .The mild process of cooling is designed not to be aggressive in attacking the body with a temperature change.You can even sleep with it on.Wearing it during workouts isn t advised because of profuse sweat seeping into the circuitry.
And if the Reanima project succeeds, we will have to revise our concept of brain death and possibly the status of some patients.The tougher, ethical question is whether this actually would help the deceased person, or assuming it works even bring about a new person.For someone to survive, we are generally discontent with mere bodily survival, there has to be a person with some psychological continuity, too.Exactly what kind of continuity is often glossed over in standard philosophical considerations about personal identity since these are more often concerned with the metaphysics of what is going on than the messy issues of radical personality change or brain damage.In the best possible case, the proposed Reanima treatment would miraculously restore the previously-declared dead person.Disrupting death is unlikely to be easy, but as author Seth Godin said: Waiting for perfect is never as smart as making progress.
A group of researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have managed to cut out HIV-1 genes from mice and rat genomes.In a proof-of-concept study, we show that our gene editing technology can be effectively delivered to many organs of two small animal models and excise large fragments of viral DNA from the host cell genome, said Professor Kamel Khalili, who led the study.This, scientists hope, could one day lead to the elimination of the deadly virus in human patients as well.This would potentially excise the viral DNA fragment from the genome altogether.After two weeks, the Temple University team examined their subjects DNA, and found that the HIV DNA was no longer present, seemingly removed from every tissue, including the brain, heart, kidney, liver, lungs, spleen, and blood cells.The next step for Khalili s team will be to conduct a larger study on animals, but the team hopes that a clinical trial for human patients could come to fruition within the next several years.
It all started because Amy Karle wanted to grow her own exoskeleton.But after experimenting with 3D printing bones during an artist residency program through Autodesk's Pier 9 workshop in San Francisco, she set her sights on something a little smaller and more intimate.But both of those options raised safety issues, so she and the scientists settled for using human mesenchymal stem cells, extracted from bone marrow of course you can order human stem cells online .Currently, Karle is culturing the cells, and the next step in her project will be to grow them on the hand trellis.She's studied skeletal structures at the California Academy of Sciences in order to produce her own alien-esque vertebrae and skulls.She has also grown crystals out of a lattice, in abstract imitation of what it's like to grow flesh on a tissue trellis.
From food to human tissue, 3D printing is going to change the world as we know it, but what is the real technology beyond all the tech jargon?3D printing or additive manufacturing AM is the capability of printing three dimensional objects, which can take any shape, form or size.According to the Standard Terminology for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials ASTM , there are seven categories for 3D printing processes.The process is controlled by a computer-aided manufacturing CAM software package.Here, a high intensity laser fuses small particles of any given material, from plastic, metal, ceramic to glass, into the desired end-shape.As for sheet lamination, metal, paper or polymer can be used.
Between the 3:2 aspect ratio, 13.5-inch screen and its practically-trademarked "dynamic fulcrum" hinge, there isn't any machine on the planet like the Surface Book – and then, with the touch of a button and a gentle tug, it becomes a tablet.On May 24, yet another firmware update was issued, most notably fixing stability issues when waking up your Surface Book from sleep mode in addition to improving on touch screen responsiveness.Mind the gapAt the midpoint of the Surface Book, there's a piece of connective tissue that Microsoft calls the dynamic fulcrum hinge.But it didn't really click with me until I realized how easily it lets me bring my entire PC to another place without having to disconnect my external monitor, keyboard, mouse, Xbox controller and all my other peripherals at homeIt's the coolest mechanic since the saucer separation of the Enterprise-D. What's more, it leaves open a door to expandability.While this might look like a lot on paper for an Ultrabook-class device, consider the 13-inch MacBook Pro weighs just as much despite it packing a smaller screen, no dedicated GPU and fewer batteries.Microsoft's first laptop won't be replacing your PC gaming rig any time soon, but it's surprising how well this machine gets along with only 1GB of video RAM.
And Sky Q is packed with cutting-edge ideas - some of which Sky customers won't even see for the first couple of months.The standard Sky Q box offers 1TB of storage, the ability to record three things at once and watch a fourth, and you can also stream to one tablet.Once this is done, Sky hooks your system up with the hub and figures out the best way to map the devices in your house - this is the longest part of the installation, as Sky need to make sure that nothing interferes with television signal and vice versa.Gone is the the basic grid, in its place is a swish new vertical setup, with great animations and a more seamless way to mesh both live TV and on-demand.The live picture has switched from the top right corner, to the middle of the left panel.It's remarkable that you have to go this granular to pick fault, however, given the sheer level of complexity in terms of the features this is an intuitive and refined experience.
Given the widespread global usage of mobile communications among users of all ages, even a very small increase in the incidence of disease resulting from exposure to radio-frequency radiation could have broad implications for public health, according to a report of partial findings from the study, which was released late Thursday.Earlier in the week, the NIH said, It is important to note that previous human, observational data collected in earlier, large-scale population-based studies have found limited evidence of an increased risk for developing cancer from cellphone use.Where people were saying there s no risk, I think this ends that kind of statement, said Ron Melnick, who ran the NTP project until retiring in 2009 and recently reviewed the study s results.Since mobile phones were launched commercially in the 1980s, the only widely agreed upon physical impact from cellphone radio-frequency energy is that it can heat human tissue at high enough levels.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration appointed the NTP to study cellphone radio-frequency radiation nearly two decades ago.In 2005, the NTP selected the IIT Research Institute in Chicago to carry out the experiments.
If you re not vegetarian or vegan, you ve probably received a mouthful on this subject from a friend or family member before, so I m going to keep it brief and focus on the argument cultured meat proponents seem to embrace the most: Sustainability.By 2050, global meat production is projected to double from its 1999 levels, according to the FAO.This actually makes a lot of sense, Shier Friedman, co-founder of the pro-cultured meat Modern Agriculture Foundation told me over the phone.Still, one can argue the demonstration was less about the meat s flavor and more about what scientists had managed to accomplish.So, Post s lab is now culturing fatty tissue in addition to muscle fibers.Image via David Parry / PA WireAnother technical issue Post s team is trying to sort out how to boost cultured beef s iron content.
A two-year, $25 million study conducted by the National Toxicology Program found an increase in brain tumors among male rats that were constantly exposed to the same radiation that s emitted from mobile phones.Researchers at the National Toxicology Program, a federal interagency effort, found that a small percentage of male rats 2 to 3 percent that were chronically exposed to radio-frequency radiation wound up with rare cancerous tumor formations in their hearts and brains.Chronically exposed meant nine hours a day, seven days a week, for two years.Although we can t say yet that those results would be the same among humans, the fact that radio-frequency radiation has been linked to tumor growth at all turns some of the U.S. government s long-held beliefs about cellphones upside-down.What s important about this study is that previously we had government officials saying that cell radiation cannot have a biological impact except through the heating of tissue, Michael Hansen, senior scientist at Consumer Reports, told The Huffington Post.The researchers at the National Toxicology Program sounded the alarm: Given the widespread global usage of mobile communications among users of all ages, even a very small increase in the incidence of disease resulting from exposure to RFR radio-frequency radiation could have broad implications for public health.
Big news this month on the medical front when a surgical robot called STAR — Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot — succeeded, in both a lab setting and using live animal tissue, to stitch together pieces of pig intestinal tubing with very little guidance from humans.Not only that, but it managed to do so with the same if not better accuracy and safety than doctors, according to the researchers behind the experiment.This is a momentous advancement for medical robots and telesurgery alike, and with sales of such robots expected to double to $6.4 billion a yearly increase of 10.2% by 2020, according to an Allied Market Research report published in January, we re only going to hear about more and more progress in the near future.Which is beyond fantastic.Ever since the first telesurgery was performed in 2001, when a surgeon in New York successfully took out the gall bladder of a patient in Strasbourg, there has been increasing hope of one day providing excellent medical care to people who would otherwise be thousands of miles away from any surgical help.One that we need to start fixing now, before medical robots become ubiquitous and the norm.All these surgical robots will operate over public networks and poor connections, sometimes even wireless ones, which leaves them exposed to hacking and other types of malicious attacks.And even though it might seem that these privacy and security concerns are better suited for a sci-fi horror movie in the SAW vein than real life, a surgical robot has already been hacked.Maybe you re thinking that this was just an experiment and since no real-life incidents have been reported to date which is a fact , there s no need to panic.But let s not forget that these surgical and non-surgical robots operate and will continue to do so within the boundaries and the privacy and security means of the healthcare industry — an industry that is so plagued by breaches, data theft, and ransomware that IBM named 2015 The Year of the Healthcare Breach in its Cyber Security Intelligence Index.And if the past months are any indication, 2016 could very well turn out to be The Year of the Healthcare Breach – The Sequel.Soon after that, it was reported that MedStar Health, a healthcare organization operating over 120 entities including 10 hospitals in the Baltimore–Washington area, had been attacked by some type of ransomware as well.Add this to the fact that, as research carried out by Sergey Lozhkin at Kaspersky Lab brought to light, there are a lot of cases where medical equipment is not separated from the local office network, and all that bright future of telesurgery and medical robots looks riddled with potential breaches.Sometimes even between life and death.Aike Müller is founder of Keezel.
Image: Flickr Creative CommonsSchizophrenia is a mysterious, misunderstood mental illness without a full cure.However, researchers from the United Kingdom and China may have found a clue that could help to understand it better.According to Science Daily, a new study that looked at MRI scans shows that while schizophrenic participants showed a reduction in brain tissue volume, subtle increases in brain matter were seen in certain areas of the brain.Our results highlight that despite the severity of tissue damage, the brain of a patient with schizophrenia is constantly attempting to reorganize itself, possibly to rescue itself or limit the damage, said Dr. Lena Palaniyappan, an author on the study.But the research shows that, while subtle, the process could be reversible.The brain may be capable of fighting off some of the effects of schizophrenia on its own and could lead to more answers in the fight against the disease, maybe including treatments that utilize the brain, researchers stated.
Conducted in partnership with the Israeli stem cell research company Accellta, Nano Dimension s recent experiment represents a dramatic shift from its typical focus on electronics such as circuit boards and nanotechnology-based inks.Accellta would bring its incredibly deep well of stem cell research — including a suspension-based cell culturing system that produces billions of stem cells — while Nano Dimension would, obviously, contribute its cutting-edge 3D printing technology.The partnership would allow for what would likely be a significant step forward in the ongoing study of bioprinting human organs and tissue.Nano Dimensions 3D printing of living cells is a technology that is already playing a significant role in medical research, but in order for it to reach its full potential, for the field to evolve further, there is a need to improve printing speeds, print resolution, cell control, and viability as well as cell availability and bio-ink technologies, said Nano Dimension s CEO Amit Dror.Though it s certainly not the only bioprinting entity in the mix, Nano s work shows that IDTechEx s estimation of the growing market isn t all that far-fetched.By combining our high-speed, high-precision inkjet capabilities with Accellta s stem cell suspension technologies and induced differentiation capabilities led by a world-renowned group of experienced engineers and scientists, we can enable 3D printing at high resolution and high volumes, Dror added.
Besides shooting an actual human or a pig carcass, the best way to determine the efficacy of a projectile — like a bullet – is with ballistic gel, which has almost identical density and viscosity to human muscle tissue.But how does it fare against extraordinary voltages?Andy from Photonicinduction claims to have 25 years of electric experience , and owns a number of very large, very loud power supplies which he has used to electrocute things on the internet for the last eight years.At around 250 volts the metal probes cut through the gel like butter.At 100,000 volts the gel is surrounded by Emperor Palpatine-style Force lightning.Some might call Andy s experiments a hazard or profoundly unsafe but he hasn t blown the roof off his house or fried himself yet, so he s obviously doing something right.
An innovative sponge-filled dressing device recently saved the life of a coalition forces soldier who was shot in the leg.It s the first documented clinical use of the product, known as XSTAT.The haemostatic device, developed by RevMedx Inc., was used by a United States forward surgical team FST after it failed to staunch severe bleeding in a patient using standard techniques.In this first reported case, a soldier suffered a gunshot wound to the left thigh.Here s a detailed description from the Journal of Emergency Medical Services:The femoral artery and vein were transected and damage to the femur and soft tissue left a sizeable cavity in the leg.And it look likes Barofsky s hope will soon come true.
Image: RevMedx Inc. An innovative sponge-filled dressing device recently saved the life of a coalition forces soldier who was shot in the leg.The hemostatic device, developed by RevMedx Inc., was used by a United States forward surgical team FST after it failed to stanch severe bleeding in a patient using standard techniques.Once injected, the sponge-like tablets rapidly expand within the wound and exert hemostatic pressure to stop the bleeding.In this first reported case, a soldier suffered a gunshot wound to the left thigh.Here s a detailed description from the Journal of Emergency Medical Services:The femoral artery and vein were transected and damage to the femur and soft tissue left a sizable cavity in the leg.And it look likes Barofsky s hope will soon come true.
Besides shooting an actual human or a pig carcass, the best way to determine the efficacy of a projectile — like a bullet – is with ballistic gel, which has almost identical density and viscosity to human muscle tissue.But how does it fare against extraordinary voltages?Andy from Photonicinduction claims to have 25 years of electric experience , and owns a number of very large, very loud power supplies which he has used to electrocute things on the internet for the last eight years.At around 250 volts the metal probes cut through the gel like butter.At 100,000 volts the gel is surrounded by Emperor Palpatine-style Force lightning.Some might call Andy s experiments a hazard or profoundly unsafe but he hasn t blown the roof off his house or fried himself yet, so he s obviously doing something right.
An innovative sponge-filled dressing device recently saved the life of a coalition forces soldier who was shot in the leg.It s the first documented clinical use of the product, known as XSTAT.The haemostatic device, developed by RevMedx Inc., was used by a United States forward surgical team FST after it failed to staunch severe bleeding in a patient using standard techniques.In this first reported case, a soldier suffered a gunshot wound to the left thigh.Here s a detailed description from the Journal of Emergency Medical Services:The femoral artery and vein were transected and damage to the femur and soft tissue left a sizeable cavity in the leg.And it look likes Barofsky s hope will soon come true.
As computational power has exploded in the past half-century, it has enabled a parallel expansion in the capabilities of these computer-aided imaging systems.The images produced by each of these systems derive from an elegant interplay of sensors, physics and computation.Dense objects, such as bones, absorb and scatter many more X-ray photons than skin, muscle or other soft tissue, which appear darker in the projections.This requires scanning from only a very limited set of angles around the subject.When that happens, the computer goes back and refines its guess of the image, recalculates the data associated with this guess and again compares with the actual scan results.Eric Miller, Professor and Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Adjunct Professor of Computer Science, Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts UniversityThis article was originally published on The Conversation.
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