John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences/Harvard UniversityA titanium dioxide metamaterial lensIt might be small, but it s a big feat.In a normal lens, a curved glass surface a few millimetres or even centimetres thick redirects light rays to a common focal point.To improve the image – say, to take out distortions, or make sure different wavelengths of light all get focused correctly – you have to keep adding glass layers.As a result, cameras, microscopes and telescopes are limited in part by the size and heft of the lenses they require.Tiny StonehengeUsing a beam of electrons, the team carved nanofins – 600-nanometre-tall blocks that together resemble the world s smallest Stonehenge – out of a block of titanium dioxide.Each could focus light more sharply than a 55-millimetre-thick Nikon microscope lens with similar optical properties – even though the 600-nanometre-thick metamaterial lens was 100,000 times thinner than the Nikon.
A few years back, I decided to ditch my trusty DSLR and take an entirely different approach to digital photography.I wanted something that didn t feel like a chore to haul around but could still take respectable images.I ended up going with a micro four thirds system and haven t looked back although recent developments at Harvard may one day change my mind.Researchers there have developed a lens built of transparent quartz that s coated with millions of microscopic titanium dioxide towers arranged in specific patterns to focus light.The end result is that light focused through a 600nm metalens can achieve the same resolution and magnification as a traditional 5-6cm glass lens.Assuming everything pans out, we could see smartphones with DSLR-quality cameras arrive sooner than we think.
Researchers at Harvard in the US have developed a new lens that is thinner than a human hair. The lens that is inexpensive to manufacture gives according Peta Pixel image quality that is better than a high-class conventional camera lens performs. When the lenses are fully developed they believed could be used for example in mobile camera then be able to give as good pictures as an SLR. The new lens consists of millions of small columns of titanium dioxide fixed to a quartz glass disc. By arranging pillars in different patterns, the incident light is focused in a similar way as a conventional lens. The prototype manufactured by the researchers has a diameter of just two millimeters but according to the BBC, the lenses can basically be how big any time and are produced in a similar way as silicon circuits produced.
On the one hand…One way to identify molecules with mirror versions – a property known as chirality – is to look at how they scatter light waves.But current techniques for measuring polarisation involve using multiple lenses and other optical elements like beam-splitters and filters, which can degrade the image quality.The lens is made from a layer of titanium dioxide that has been etched by a beam of electrons into rows of pillars just 600 nanometres high, sitting on top of an ordinary sheet of glass.In a row, each rectangular pillar is at an angle to the one before it, so that the orientation of the pillars along the line seems to rotate clockwise or anticlockwise.To test out the lens, the team took a picture of a Chrysina gloriosa, a beetle whose shell is known to reflect left-handed light above .Journal reference: Nano Letters, DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01897
Is this the new Festival Vision Simulator 3000?While this does looks like something you d see after drinking a mushroom milkshake at TranceFest2016, it is in fact a very close-up look at millions of precisely arranged titanium dioxide pillars, resting on a layer of transparent quartz that s thinner than a human hair.Obviously this explains nothing on its own, so please allow us to dazzle you with science.This intricate setup is, despite all appearances, the future of cameras.In other words, what you re looking at here, is going to replace the lens in your camera, smartphone and microscope, and it s very clever indeed.So let s start off with the regular lenses you re already using.
ProtectPax might just be revolutionary.It's a gel that claims to make your smartphone's screen just as resistant to scratches as tempered glass protectors.If you re the type that worries about wayward car keys or nail files scratching your pricey smartphone s screen, fret no more.It sounds almost too good to be true.ProtectPax s crowdfunding page describes it as a nano protector pioneered by titans in the aviation and aerospace industries.Titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the gel fill microscopic valleys on your smartphone s screen, effectively reinforcing it against bumps and bruises.
Australian chemists have found a way to use sunlight to purify wastewater faster, cheaper, 15 times more efficient than anything currently on the market - all without the need for ultraviolet light.Using modified titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst that works with sunlight, the technology is different to other major water purification products on the market - since it doesn't need any UV light.Research group leader Professor Yun Liu from The Australian National University (ANU) said the team's invention was 15 times more efficient than leading commercialised products."With innovative chemistry design, we can use our photocatalyst to purify water with natural sunlight instead of UV light and dramatically reduce costs for operators," said Professor Liu from the ANU Research School of Chemistry."Our photocatalyst can completely decompose organic pollutants in wastewater in 20 minutes, compared with the leading commercialised products which take one hour to decompose only 26 per cent of the same pollutants."The new technology could be useful for treating water for human consumption and has potential applications in making self-cleaning building materials, including glass, and splitting water to make hydrogen fuel.
Australian chemists have found a way to use sunlight to purify wastewater faster, cheaper, 15 times more efficient than anything currently on the market - all without the need for ultraviolet light.Using modified titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst that works with sunlight, the technology is different to other major water purification products on the market - since it doesn't need any UV light.Research group leader Professor Yun Liu from The Australian National University (ANU) said the team's invention was 15 times more efficient than leading commercialised products."With innovative chemistry design, we can use our photocatalyst to purify water with natural sunlight instead of UV light and dramatically reduce costs for operators," said Professor Liu from the ANU Research School of Chemistry."Our photocatalyst can completely decompose organic pollutants in wastewater in 20 minutes, compared with the leading commercialised products which take one hour to decompose only 26 per cent of the same pollutants."The new technology could be useful for treating water for human consumption and has potential applications in making self-cleaning building materials, including glass, and splitting water to make hydrogen fuel.
Toyota is road testing a radical idea to clean up California's troublesome air pollution problem by using advertising billboards to act as giant filters.The car company's eco-billboard uses 'catalytic converter-style' technology whereby its titanium dioxide coated vinyl purifies the surrounding air.Oxygen reacts with the light-activated energised surface and removes nitrogen dioxide, converting it to nitrate.Thirty-seven eco-billboards will be placed in locations across California and San Francisco from 3 April to 28 May with the estimation that the combined 24,960 square feet of 'pollution scrubbing' surface is enough to reverse the equivalent of 5,285 vehicles' worth of nitrogen dioxide in that time.It might seem ironic that a car company is attempting to alleviate air pollution considering vehicles on California's roads are the biggest contributors to pollution.However, the billboards serve as part of a promotional campaign for its hydrogen-fuelled Mirai.
In the blood, some water molecules that are loosely bound to these large clusters are pulled off for use in cells.Hydrozomes (a new nano-engineered form of water molecules) are quite different.Titanium dioxide, for example, is used to increase the whiteness of milk, yogurt and dairy substitutes.Nano-materials are also used in chocolate, salad dressings, cereal, pasta and other foods.Hydrozome technology is an engineered nano nutrient delivery mechanism for the human body, with two basic functions: 1) it delivers nutrients that are easily absorbed and utilized, and 2) it provides advanced cellular hydration.All nutrients that are utilized by the body are naturally nano-sized, and it is the process of chewing, digestion, enzymatic and organic metabolism activity that accomplish this.
Probiotics, being live microbes, exert numerous beneficial health effects on the host cells.Such probiotics are commercially available as dietary supplements, foods, pharmaceutical formulations.Yakult, Activia yogurt, DanActive fermented milk provide health benefits like boosting up the immune system, treating digestive problems, mental illness, neurological disorders, cancer, etc.However, the use of probiotic bacteria to develop metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) constitutes novel research nowadays.Research inputs and patent reports according to an article published in the journal Recent Patents on Drug Delivery and Formulation highlight their potential in the field of cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, medicine and biotechnology as well.Prof. Kamla Pathak, the corresponding author said: "Our review findings reinstate the potential of probiotic bacteria to produce MNPs.
Sensitized solar cells consisting of a molecular or solid-state sensitizer that serves to collect light and inject an electron into a substrate that favors their migration are among the most studied photovoltaic systems at present.Despite its importance in determining the potential of a photovoltaic device, current methods for monitoring the interfacial electron transfer remain ambiguous.Now, using deep-ultraviolet continuum pulses, EPFL scientists have developed a substrate-specific method to detect electron transfer.The group focused on two types of dye-sensitized solar conversion systems: one based on titanium dioxide, the other on zinc-oxide nanoparticles, both of which belong to the category of transition-metal oxide (TMO) substrates.These TMOs are characterized by specific absorption bands, which are fingerprints of the system and are due to neutral electron-hole pairs, called an exciton.The EPFL team aimed to overcome the limitations of current methods of measuring electron transfer, which all use light in the visible-to-terahertz frequencies (wavelengths around 400 - 30000 nm).
A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter.With greater demand for nano products comes the need to find new nanomaterials.Carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, quantum dots and nanocrystals, silver nanowire and nanoparticles, fine and ultrafine particulates, titanium dioxide nanoparticles, fullerenes, and buckyballs are some of the new nanomaterials that have been recently discovered or created.Nanomanufacturing, the process of building nano parts or developing parts for nano products is a budding field.Techniques such as laser shock imprinting, which form nanoscale metallic shapes on objects, are being developed.Of all the industries, manufacturing is one area which will benefit the greatest from and contribute the most to nanotechnology.
The elements that make up the ink in tattoos travel inside the body in micro and nanoparticle forms and reach the lymph nodes according to a study published in Scientific Reports on 12 September by scientists from Germany and the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France).It is the first time that there is analytical evidence of the transport of various organic and inorganic pigments and toxic element impurities as well as in depth characterization of the pigments ex vivo in tattooed tissues.No one checks the chemical composition of the colours, but our study shows that maybe they should", explains Hiram Castillo, one of the authors of the study and scientist at the ESRF.The reality is that little is known about the potential impurities in the colour mixture applied to the skin.Most tattoo inks contain organic pigments, but also include preservatives and contaminants like nickel, chromium, manganese or cobalt.Scientists from the ESRF, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Ludwig-Maximilians University, and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt have managed to get a very clear picture on the location of titanium dioxide once they get in the tissue.
A step towards new "beyond lithium" rechargeable batteries with superior performance has been made by researchers at the University of Bath.We increasingly rely on rechargeable batteries for a host of essential uses; from mobile phones and electric cars to electrical grid storage.As we continue to transition from fossil fuels to low emission energy sources, new battery technologies will be needed for new applications and more efficient energy storage.For batteries of equal size, this would give multivalent batteries better energy storage capacity and performance.The team showed that titanium dioxide can be modified to allow it to be used as an electrode in multivalent batteries, providing a valuable proof of concept in their development.Dr Benjamin Morgan, from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Bath, said: "Multivalent batteries are a really exciting direction for battery technology, potentially offering higher charge densities and better performance.
Less well known are other higher titanium oxides -- those with a higher number of titanium and oxygen atoms than TiO -- that are now the subject of intensifying research due to their potential use in next-generation electronic devices.Now, researchers at Tokyo Tech have reported superconductivity in two kinds of higher titanium oxides prepared in the form of ultrathin films.With a thickness of around 120 nanometers, these materials reveal properties that are only just beginning to be explored."We succeeded in growing thin films of Ti4O7 and γ-Ti3O5 for the first time," says Kohei Yoshimatsu, lead author of the paper published in Scientific Reports.Until now, the two materials had only been studied in bulk form, in which they behave as insulators -- the opposite of conductors.The thin films are epitaxial, meaning that they have a well-aligned crystalline structure (see Figure 1).
The weirdness of exoplanets continues to amaze.It snows titanium dioxide, one of the active ingredients in sunscreen, on one giant, scorching-hot alien world, a new study suggests.Astronomers used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study Kepler-13Ab, a planet that's six times more massive than Jupiter and that lies 1,730 light-years from Earth.[Hubble in Pictures: Astronomers' Top Picks (Photos)]Kepler-13Ab is very close to its host star, completing one orbit every 1.8 Earth days.As a result, the planet is one of the hottest worlds known, with a dayside temperature of nearly 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit (2,760 degrees Celsius), researchers said.
I’ve now had the iPhone X for just 24 hours—the majority of which have been spent trying to break Face ID.For the most part, Face ID has worked as described—opening my phone when I’m sitting in the dark, or wearing a variety of glasses.But today, while shooting a Facebook Live illustrating the technology, I managed to kind of break Face ID.First of all, I wanted to know whether Face ID would work when my eyes are closed.It’s not supposed to—it tracks the movement of your eyes using its combination of infrared light and cameras to make sure you’re actually there and paying attention.A colleague even managed to open the phone using my face while I feigned sleep.
I’ve now had the iPhone X for just 24 hours—the majority of which have been spent trying to break Face ID.For the most part, Face ID has worked as described—opening my phone when I’m sitting in the dark, or wearing a variety of glasses.But today, while shooting a Facebook Live illustrating the technology, I managed to kind of break Face ID.First of all, I wanted to know whether Face ID would work when my eyes are closed.It’s not supposed to—it tracks the movement of your eyes using its combination of infrared light and cameras to make sure you’re actually there and paying attention.A colleague even managed to open the phone using my face while I feigned sleep.
A research team of Energy Science and Engineering at DGIST has succeeded in developing a titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based high efficiency photocatalyst that converts carbon dioxide to methane using a simple reduction method.The photocatalysts developed by the research team can be used to convert carbon dioxide to fuels like methane.Therefore, it is expected to be applied to technologies for carbon dioxide abatement and resource reclamation.As is now well known, anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases, particularly CO2, is a significant factor driving global climate change; sustainable, low carbon, readily portable fuels are one of the most pressing needs of modern society.To that end, there has been a worldwide effort underway to find ways to convert carbon dioxide, a major contributor to global warming, into a usable fuel, such as hydrogen, methane, ethanol, methanol, and butanol.In order to utilize carbon dioxide as a resource, it is essential to increase the conversion efficiency and light absorption efficiency when converting carbon dioxide into fuel, and to make photocatalyst help to prevent secondary harmful substances.
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